Special Issue "Biosensors for Daily Monitoring Chronic Conditions at the Point-of-Need"

A special issue of Biosensors (ISSN 2079-6374).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 March 2021).

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Fatih Inci
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
UNAM, Institute of Materials Science and Nanotechnology, Bilkent University, Ankara, Turkey
Interests: microfluidics; lab-on-a-chip; plasmonic biosensors; bionanotechnology; nanoplasmonics; wearable sensors; infectious diseases; HIV/AIDS; cancer research; personalized medicine; point of care diagnostics; mobile health; global health; biomedical engineering; molecular diagnostics; telemedicine
Prof. Dr. Adil Denizli
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Chemistry, Hacettepe University, 06800 Ankara, Turkey
Interests: molecular imprinting technologies; biosensors; biomolecules detection; biomolecules purification; chromatographic methods; hemoperfusion; polymers synthesis; application of these polymers in medicine and biochemistry

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Biosensors have impacted on a vast majority of tools in clinical diagnostics and screening, and now they are swiftly becoming part of our daily life. As a crucial example, we have largely benefitted from blood glucose monitoring tools that are successfully integrated into our everyday lives, and have therefore accelerated disease/health status monitoring. In particular, chronic conditions, such as diabetes, heart disease, arthritis, cancer, asthma, and some viral infections (such as hepatitis C and HIV/AIDS), require the frequent monitoring of biomarkers, with reliable tools, facile sampling and low-power processors that can be easily performed by end-users (mostly untrained persons), without any disruptions to their routine. Recent advances in biosensing tools with emerging nanotechnological modalities and distant but supplementary fields (e.g., artificial intelligence, internet of things (IoT)) have hurdled the vast majority of challenges in the daily monitoring of chronic conditions, as well as their treatment statuses. The further integration of biosensors with novel biomarkers, such as circulating cells/cellular components, extracellular vesicles, and proteins, has paved the way to their integration into our daily life, leveraging the current status of clinical management, by allowing the efficient and ubiquitous monitoring of conditions. This Special Issue will cover the recent advances in biosensors and their applications in monitoring chronic conditions in point-of-need settings.

Dr. Fatih Inci
Prof. Dr. Adil Denizli
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Biosensors is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

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Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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Article
Whole Cell Recognition of Staphylococcus aureus Using Biomimetic SPR Sensors
Biosensors 2021, 11(5), 140; https://doi.org/10.3390/bios11050140 - 29 Apr 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 759
Abstract
Over the past few decades, a significant increase in multi-drug-resistant pathogenic microorganisms has been of great concern and directed the research subject to the challenges that the distribution of resistance genes represent. Globally, high levels of multi-drug resistance represent a significant health threat [...] Read more.
Over the past few decades, a significant increase in multi-drug-resistant pathogenic microorganisms has been of great concern and directed the research subject to the challenges that the distribution of resistance genes represent. Globally, high levels of multi-drug resistance represent a significant health threat and there is a growing requirement of rapid, accurate, real-time detection which plays a key role in tracking of measures for the infections caused by these bacterial strains. It is also important to reduce transfer of resistance genes to new organisms. The, World Health Organization has informed that millions of deaths have been reported each year recently. To detect the resistant organisms traditional detection approaches face limitations, therefore, newly developed technologies are needed that are suitable to be used in large-scale applications. In the present study, the aim was to design a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensor with micro-contact imprinted sensor chips for the detection of Staphylococcus aureus. Whole cell imprinting was performed by N-methacryloyl-L-histidine methyl ester (MAH) under UV polymerization. Sensing experiments were done within a concentration range of 1.0 × 102–2.0 × 105 CFU/mL. The recognition of S. aureus was accomplished by the involvement of microcontact imprinting and optical sensor technology with a detection limit of 1.5 × 103 CFU/mL. Selectivity of the generated sensor was evaluated through injections of competing bacterial strains. The responses for the different strains were compared to that of S. aureus. Besides, real experiments were performed with milk samples spiked with S. aureus and it was demonstrated that the prepared sensor platform was applicable for real samples. Full article
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Article
Surface Plasmon Resonance Based on Molecularly Imprinted Polymeric Film for l-Phenylalanine Detection
Biosensors 2021, 11(1), 21; https://doi.org/10.3390/bios11010021 - 15 Jan 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 919
Abstract
In this study, we designed a simple, rapid, sensitive and selective surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensor for detection of L-phenylalaine by utilizing molecular imprinting technology. l-phenylalanine imprinted and non-imprinted poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate-methacryloyl-l-phenylalanine) polymeric films were synthesized onto SPR chip surfaces using [...] Read more.
In this study, we designed a simple, rapid, sensitive and selective surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensor for detection of L-phenylalaine by utilizing molecular imprinting technology. l-phenylalanine imprinted and non-imprinted poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate-methacryloyl-l-phenylalanine) polymeric films were synthesized onto SPR chip surfaces using ultraviolet polymerization. l-phenyalanine imprinted and non-imprinted SPR sensors were characterized by using contact angle, atomic force microscopy and ellipsometry. After characterization studies, kinetic studies were carried out in the concentration range of 5.0–400.0 μM. The limit of detection and quantification were obtained as 0.0085 and 0.0285 μM, respectively. The response time for the test including equilibration, adsorption and desorption was approximately 9 min. The selectivity studies of the l-phenylalanine imprinted SPR sensor was performed in the presence of d-phenylalanine and l-tryptophan. Validation studies were carried out via enzyme-linked immunosorbent analysis technique in order to demonstrate the applicability and superiority of the l-phenylalanine imprinted SPR sensor. Full article
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Review

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Review
Recent Advances in Microneedle-Based Sensors for Sampling, Diagnosis and Monitoring of Chronic Diseases
Biosensors 2021, 11(9), 296; https://doi.org/10.3390/bios11090296 - 25 Aug 2021
Viewed by 604
Abstract
Chronic diseases (CDs) are noncommunicable illnesses with long-term symptoms accounting for ~70% of all deaths worldwide. For the diagnosis and prognosis of CDs, accurate biomarker detection is essential. Currently, the detection of CD-associated biomarkers is employed through complex platforms with certain limitations in [...] Read more.
Chronic diseases (CDs) are noncommunicable illnesses with long-term symptoms accounting for ~70% of all deaths worldwide. For the diagnosis and prognosis of CDs, accurate biomarker detection is essential. Currently, the detection of CD-associated biomarkers is employed through complex platforms with certain limitations in their applicability and performance. There is hence unmet need to present innovative strategies that are applicable to the point-of-care (PoC) settings, and also, provide the precise detection of biomarkers. On the other hand, especially at PoC settings, microneedle (MN) technology, which comprises micron-size needles arranged on a miniature patch, has risen as a revolutionary approach in biosensing strategies, opening novel horizons to improve the existing PoC devices. Various MN-based platforms have been manufactured for distinctive purposes employing several techniques and materials. The development of MN-based biosensors for real-time monitoring of CD-associated biomarkers has garnered huge attention in recent years. Herein, we summarize basic concepts of MNs, including microfabrication techniques, design parameters, and their mechanism of action as a biosensing platform for CD diagnosis. Moreover, recent advances in the use of MNs for CD diagnosis are introduced and finally relevant clinical trials carried out using MNs as biosensing devices are highlighted. This review aims to address the potential use of MNs in CD diagnosis. Full article
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Review
Point of Care Diagnostics in Resource-Limited Settings: A Review of the Present and Future of PoC in Its Most Needed Environment
Biosensors 2020, 10(10), 133; https://doi.org/10.3390/bios10100133 - 24 Sep 2020
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 1540
Abstract
Point of care (PoC) diagnostics are at the focus of government initiatives, NGOs and fundamental research alike. In high-income countries, the hope is to streamline the diagnostic procedure, minimize costs and make healthcare processes more efficient and faster, which, in some cases, can [...] Read more.
Point of care (PoC) diagnostics are at the focus of government initiatives, NGOs and fundamental research alike. In high-income countries, the hope is to streamline the diagnostic procedure, minimize costs and make healthcare processes more efficient and faster, which, in some cases, can be more a matter of convenience than necessity. However, in resource-limited settings such as low-income countries, PoC-diagnostics might be the only viable route, when the next laboratory is hours away. Therefore, it is especially important to focus research into novel diagnostics for these countries in order to alleviate suffering due to infectious disease. In this review, the current research describing the use of PoC diagnostics in resource-limited settings and the potential bottlenecks along the value chain that prevent their widespread application is summarized. To this end, we will look at literature that investigates different parts of the value chain, such as fundamental research and market economics, as well as actual use at healthcare providers. We aim to create an integrated picture of potential PoC barriers, from the first start of research at universities to patient treatment in the field. Results from the literature will be discussed with the aim to bring all important steps and aspects together in order to illustrate how effectively PoC is being used in low-income countries. In addition, we discuss what is needed to improve the situation further, in order to use this technology to its fullest advantage and avoid “leaks in the pipeline”, when a promising device fails to take the next step of the valorization pathway and is abandoned. Full article
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