Special Issue "Novel Biosensing Platforms for Disease Diagnosis: Translation of Lab-based Technologies into Clinical Settings"

A special issue of Biosensors (ISSN 2079-6374).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 May 2018)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Fatih Inci

Department of Radiology, Canary Center at Stanford for Cancer Early Detection, Stanford University School of Medicine, 3155 Porter Drive, Palo Alto, CA 94304, USA
Website | E-Mail
Interests: microfluidics; lab-on-a-chip; plasmonic biosensors; bionanotechnology; nanoplasmonics; wearable sensors; infectious diseases; HIV/AIDS; cancer research; personalized medicine; point of care diagnostics; mobile health; global health; biomedical engineering; molecular diagnostics; telemedicine

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The field of biosensing has seen unprecedented growth in the last decade, and recent advances in this field have revolutionized today’s clinical practice by providing innovative solutions to research laboratories and clinical settings. Particularly, biosensing technologies have created unique bridges between sensors technologies and biological needs, as well as drawn up contributions from chemistry, physics, materials science, and engineering. Integration of innovative biosensing technologies at the intersection of nano- and micro-scale denotes remarkable opportunities for addressing critical challenges in biology and medicine, and also presents a wide range of applications in clinics such as diagnosis, therapy monitoring, single cell detection, downstream genomic analysis and combating various maladies.

Biosensing approaches constitute multiple parameters, including (i) chip and sensor design, (ii) specialized surface chemistry, (iii) biological target and specimen, and (iv) clinical validation. These parameters are also evaluated with sensing performance and capabilities such as limit of detection, specificity, background noise, and linear dynamic range. Prior to their translation, aforementioned points, especially clinical validations, are uniquely addressed.

In this Special Issue, we will focus on innovative biosensing technologies, including plasmonics, nanoplasmonics, electrochemical sensing, wearable technologies, paper-based detection strategies, and mechanical modalities. Moreover, we seek the significance of unique materials and sensor components (smart polymers, metamaterials, aptamers, imprinted surfaces, click-chemistry approaches, synthetic antibodies, and so on), as well as review novel biomarkers, e.g., circulating DNAs, exosomes, volatile organic compounds, from multiple biosepecimen types, including tears, saliva, serum, urine, and breath.

Dr. Fatih Inci
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Biosensors is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 350 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (5 papers)

View options order results:
result details:
Displaying articles 1-5
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

Open AccessArticle Design and Parameter Study of Integrated Microfluidic Platform for CTC Isolation and Enquiry; A Numerical Approach
Biosensors 2018, 8(2), 56; https://doi.org/10.3390/bios8020056
Received: 17 March 2018 / Revised: 28 April 2018 / Accepted: 11 June 2018 / Published: 18 June 2018
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (7173 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Being the second cause of mortality across the globe, there is now a persistent effort to establish new cancer medication and therapies. Any accomplishment in treating cancers entails the existence of accurate identification systems empowering the early diagnosis. Recent studies indicate CTCs’ potential
[...] Read more.
Being the second cause of mortality across the globe, there is now a persistent effort to establish new cancer medication and therapies. Any accomplishment in treating cancers entails the existence of accurate identification systems empowering the early diagnosis. Recent studies indicate CTCs’ potential in cancer prognosis as well as therapy monitoring. The chief shortcoming with CTCs is that they are exceedingly rare cells in their clinically relevant concentration. Here, we simulated a microfluidic construct devised for immunomagnetic separation of the particles of interest from the background cells. This separation unit is integrated with a mixer subunit. The mixer is envisioned for mixing the CTC enriched stream with lysis buffer to extract the biological material of the cell. Some modification was proposed on mixing geometry improving the efficacy of the functional unit. A valuation of engaged forces was made and some forces were neglected due to their order of magnitude. The position of the magnet was also optimized by doing parametric study. For the mixer unit, the effect of applied voltage and frequency on mixing index was studied to find the optimal voltage and frequency which provides better mixing. Above-mentioned studies were done on isolated units and the effect of each functional unit on the other is not studied. As the final step, an integrated microfluidic platform composed of both functional subunits was simulated simultaneously. To ensure the independence of results from the grid, grid studies were also performed. The studies carried out on the construct reveal its potential for diagnostic application. Full article
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle The Use of a Polyphenoloxidase Biosensor Obtained from the Fruit of Jurubeba (Solanum paniculatum L.) in the Determination of Paracetamol and Other Phenolic Drugs
Biosensors 2018, 8(2), 36; https://doi.org/10.3390/bios8020036
Received: 20 February 2018 / Revised: 12 March 2018 / Accepted: 29 March 2018 / Published: 2 April 2018
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (6352 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The vegetable kingdom is a wide source of a diverse variety of enzymes with broad biotechnological applications. Among the main classes of plant enzymes, the polyphenol oxidases, which convert phenolic compounds to the related quinones, have been successfully used for biosensor development. The
[...] Read more.
The vegetable kingdom is a wide source of a diverse variety of enzymes with broad biotechnological applications. Among the main classes of plant enzymes, the polyphenol oxidases, which convert phenolic compounds to the related quinones, have been successfully used for biosensor development. The oxidation products from such enzymes can be electrochemically reduced, and the sensing is easily achieved by amperometric transducers. In this work, the polyphenoloxidases were extracted from jurubeba (Solanum paniculatum L.) fruits, and the extract was used to construct a carbon paste-based biosensor for pharmaceutical analysis and applications. The assay optimization was performed using a 0.1 mM catechol probe, taking into account the amount of enzymatic extract (50 or 200 μL) and the optimum pH (3.0 to 9.0) as well as some electrochemical differential pulse voltammetric (DPV) parameters (e.g., pulse amplitude, pulse range, pulse width, scan rate). Under optimized conditions, the biosensor was evaluated for the quantitative determination of acetaminophen, acetylsalicylic acid, methyldopa, and ascorbic acid. The best performance was obtained for acetaminophen, which responded linearly in the range between 5 and 245 μM (R = 0.9994), presenting a limit of detection of 3 μM and suitable repeatability ranging between 1.52% and 1.74% relative standard deviation (RSD). Full article
Figures

Graphical abstract

Review

Jump to: Research

Open AccessReview Aptamer-Based Biosensors for Antibiotic Detection: A Review
Biosensors 2018, 8(2), 54; https://doi.org/10.3390/bios8020054
Received: 26 April 2018 / Revised: 4 June 2018 / Accepted: 5 June 2018 / Published: 11 June 2018
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (1877 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Antibiotic resistance and, accordingly, their pollution because of uncontrolled usage has emerged as a serious problem in recent years. Hence, there is an increased demand to develop robust, easy, and sensitive methods for rapid evaluation of antibiotics and their residues. Among different analytical
[...] Read more.
Antibiotic resistance and, accordingly, their pollution because of uncontrolled usage has emerged as a serious problem in recent years. Hence, there is an increased demand to develop robust, easy, and sensitive methods for rapid evaluation of antibiotics and their residues. Among different analytical methods, the aptamer-based biosensors (aptasensors) have attracted considerable attention because of good selectivity, specificity, and sensitivity. This review gives an overview about recently-developed aptasensors for antibiotic detection. The use of various aptamer assays to determine different groups of antibiotics, like β-lactams, aminoglycosides, anthracyclines, chloramphenicol, (fluoro)quinolones, lincosamide, tetracyclines, and sulfonamides are presented in this paper. Full article
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessReview Review of Stratum Corneum Impedance Measurement in Non-Invasive Penetration Application
Biosensors 2018, 8(2), 31; https://doi.org/10.3390/bios8020031
Received: 24 January 2018 / Revised: 10 March 2018 / Accepted: 12 March 2018 / Published: 26 March 2018
PDF Full-text (11236 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Due to advances in telemedicine, mobile medical care, wearable health monitoring, and electronic skin, great efforts have been directed to non-invasive monitoring and treatment of disease. These processes generally involve disease detection from interstitial fluid (ISF) instead of blood, and transdermal drug delivery.
[...] Read more.
Due to advances in telemedicine, mobile medical care, wearable health monitoring, and electronic skin, great efforts have been directed to non-invasive monitoring and treatment of disease. These processes generally involve disease detection from interstitial fluid (ISF) instead of blood, and transdermal drug delivery. However, the quantitative extraction of ISF and the level of drug absorption are greatly affected by the individual’s skin permeability, which is closely related to the properties of the stratum corneum (SC). Therefore, measurement of SC impedance has been proposed as an appropriate way for assessing individual skin differences. In order to figure out the current status and research direction of human SC impedance detection, investigations regarding skin impedance measurement have been reviewed in this paper. Future directions are concluded after a review of impedance models, electrodes, measurement methods and systems, and their applications in treatment. It is believed that a well-matched skin impedance model and measurement method will be established for clinical and point-of care applications in the near future. Full article
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessFeature PaperReview Simple Approaches to Minimally-Instrumented, Microfluidic-Based Point-of-Care Nucleic Acid Amplification Tests
Biosensors 2018, 8(1), 17; https://doi.org/10.3390/bios8010017
Received: 5 January 2018 / Revised: 29 January 2018 / Accepted: 9 February 2018 / Published: 26 February 2018
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (7729 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Designs and applications of microfluidics-based devices for molecular diagnostics (Nucleic Acid Amplification Tests, NAATs) in infectious disease testing are reviewed, with emphasis on minimally instrumented, point-of-care (POC) tests for resource-limited settings. Microfluidic cartridges (‘chips’) that combine solid-phase nucleic acid extraction; isothermal enzymatic nucleic
[...] Read more.
Designs and applications of microfluidics-based devices for molecular diagnostics (Nucleic Acid Amplification Tests, NAATs) in infectious disease testing are reviewed, with emphasis on minimally instrumented, point-of-care (POC) tests for resource-limited settings. Microfluidic cartridges (‘chips’) that combine solid-phase nucleic acid extraction; isothermal enzymatic nucleic acid amplification; pre-stored, paraffin-encapsulated lyophilized reagents; and real-time or endpoint optical detection are described. These chips can be used with a companion module for separating plasma from blood through a combined sedimentation-filtration effect. Three reporter types: Fluorescence, colorimetric dyes, and bioluminescence; and a new paradigm for end-point detection based on a diffusion-reaction column are compared. Multiplexing (parallel amplification and detection of multiple targets) is demonstrated. Low-cost detection and added functionality (data analysis, control, communication) can be realized using a cellphone platform with the chip. Some related and similar-purposed approaches by others are surveyed. Full article
Figures

Figure 1

Back to Top