Recent Advances within Plant Spectroscopy: Selected Papers from the Third International Plant Spectroscopy Conference

A special issue of Biomolecules (ISSN 2218-273X).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 December 2022) | Viewed by 4584

Special Issue Editors


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Department of Chemistry, Umeå University, Linnaeus väg 6, SE-901 87 Umeå, Sweden
Interests: vibrational spectroscopy and microspectroscopy; hyperspectral imaging; multivariate data analysis
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Institute for Biophysics, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences (BOKU), A-1190 Vienna, Austria
Interests: FT-IR and Raman microscopy; fluorescence microscopy; Raman imaging; multivariate data analysis; plant cell walls; wood, nut shells
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Biopolymères Interactions Assemblages (BIA), INRAE, Rue de la Géraudière, F-44316 Nantes, France
Interests: quantification of the morphology of plant tissues and of the spatial distribution of their biochemical constituents in order to establish relationships between spatial heterogeneity and the end use properties; multi and hyperspectral image analysis; multimodal image analysis; chemometry; multiscale and multimodal imaging: microscopy and macroscopy; quantitative histology, chemical cartography

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Biopolymères Interactions Assemblages (BIA), INRAE, Rue de la Géraudière, F-44316 Nantes, France
Interests: plant cell wall; plant imaging; lignocellulosic biomass; cereal grains

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue aims to collect selected contributions from the Third International Plant Spectroscopy Conference (IPSC), scheduled to take place in Nantes, France, on September 12–15, 2022, as arranged by the International Society for Plant Spectroscopy.

Plants are vital for life on Earth, and in times when a change toward sustainability is of critical importance, they provide renewable resources for virtually all aspects of our daily lives. Plants are vastly complicated, and while detailed knowledge about plant structure and chemistry is acutely needed, such knowledge is not easy to gain. The current Research Topic aims to present the state of the art within the use of different types of spectroscopies and fields related to the study of plants and plant-based products. A special field within plant spectroscopy is hyperspectral imaging, which collects and displays chemical information in a spatial context, often at a sub-cellular resolution. The techniques are used beyond chemical compositional analyses, to understand, e.g., plant growth and development, plant biomechanics and the genetic regulations of a wide range of processes.

Since the techniques generate vast amounts of data, chemometric tools are highly valuable in the field and will be covered as well.

The proposed Research Topic presents the latest findings and developments within all the above-mentioned aspects of plant spectroscopy.

Dr. András Gorzsás
Dr. Notburga Gierlinger
Dr. Marie-Françoise Devaux
Dr. Fabienne Guillon
Guest Editors

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Keywords

  • spectroscopy
  • plant
  • imaging
  • chemometrics

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

24 pages, 6920 KiB  
Article
Maize Internode Autofluorescence at the Macroscopic Scale: Image Representation and Principal Component Analysis of a Series of Large Multispectral Images
by Marie-Françoise Devaux, Mathias Corcel, Fabienne Guillon and Cécile Barron
Biomolecules 2023, 13(7), 1104; https://doi.org/10.3390/biom13071104 - 11 Jul 2023
Viewed by 1164
Abstract
A quantitative histology of maize stems is needed to study the role of tissue and of their chemical composition in plant development and in their end-use quality. In the present work, a new methodology is proposed to show and quantify the spatial variability [...] Read more.
A quantitative histology of maize stems is needed to study the role of tissue and of their chemical composition in plant development and in their end-use quality. In the present work, a new methodology is proposed to show and quantify the spatial variability of tissue composition in plant organs and to statistically compare different samples accounting for biological variability. Multispectral UV/visible autofluorescence imaging was used to acquire a macroscale image series based on the fluorescence of phenolic compounds in the cell wall. A series of 40 multispectral large images of a whole internode section taken from four maize inbred lines were compared. The series consisted of more than 1 billion pixels and 11 autofluorescence channels. Principal Component Analysis was adapted and named large PCA and score image montages at different scales were built. Large PCA score distributions were proposed as quantitative features to compare the inbred lines. Variations in the tissue fluorescence were clearly displayed in the score images. General intensity variations were identified. Rind vascular bundles were differentiated from other tissues due to their lignin fluorescence after visible excitation, while variations within the pith parenchyma were shown via UV fluorescence. They depended on the inbred line, as revealed by the first four large PCA score distributions. Autofluorescence macroscopy combined with an adapted analysis of a series of large images is promising for the investigation of the spatial heterogeneity of tissue composition between and within organ sections. The method is easy to implement and can be easily extended to other multi–hyperspectral imaging techniques. The score distributions enable a global comparison of the images and an analysis of the inbred lines’ effect. The interpretation of the tissue autofluorescence needs to be further investigated by using complementary spatially resolved techniques. Full article
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16 pages, 6713 KiB  
Article
Comparative Analysis of G-Layers in Bast Fiber and Xylem Cell Walls in Flax Using Raman Spectroscopy
by Anne-Sophie Blervacq, Myriam Moreau, Anne Duputié and Simon Hawkins
Biomolecules 2023, 13(3), 435; https://doi.org/10.3390/biom13030435 - 24 Feb 2023
Viewed by 1499
Abstract
In a response to gravitropic stress, G-layers (gelatinous layers) were deposited in xylem cell walls of tilted flax plants. G-layers were produced in both tension wood (upper side) as expected but were also observed in opposite wood (lower side). Raman spectral profiles were [...] Read more.
In a response to gravitropic stress, G-layers (gelatinous layers) were deposited in xylem cell walls of tilted flax plants. G-layers were produced in both tension wood (upper side) as expected but were also observed in opposite wood (lower side). Raman spectral profiles were acquired for xylem G-layers from the tension and opposite side as well as from the G-layer of bast fibers grown under non-tilted conditions. Statistical analysis by principal component analysis (PCA) and partial least square-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) clearly distinguished bast fiber G-layers from xylem G-layers. Discriminating bands were observed for cellulose (380–1150–1376 cm–1), hemicelluloses (517–1094–1126–1452 cm–1) and aromatics (1270–1599–1658 cm–1). PCA did not allow separation of G-layers from tension/opposite-wood sides. In contrast, the two types of xylem G-layers could be incompletely discriminated through PLS-DA. Overall, the results suggested that while the architecture (polymer spatial distribution) of bast fibers G-layers and xylem G-layers are similar, they should be considered as belonging to a different cell wall layer category based upon ontogenetical and chemical composition parameters. Full article
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12 pages, 3007 KiB  
Article
Characterization of Potato Tuber Tissues Using Spatialized MRI T2 Relaxometry
by Guylaine Collewet, Saïd Moussaoui, Stephane Quellec, Ghina Hajjar, Laurent Leport and Maja Musse
Biomolecules 2023, 13(2), 286; https://doi.org/10.3390/biom13020286 - 2 Feb 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1153
Abstract
Magnetic Resonance Imaging is a powerful non-destructive tool in the study of plant tissues. For potato tubers, it greatly assists the study of tissue defects and tissue evolution during storage. This paper describes the MRI analysis of potato tubers with internal defects in [...] Read more.
Magnetic Resonance Imaging is a powerful non-destructive tool in the study of plant tissues. For potato tubers, it greatly assists the study of tissue defects and tissue evolution during storage. This paper describes the MRI analysis of potato tubers with internal defects in their flesh tissue at eight sampling dates from 14 to 33 weeks after harvest. Spatialized multi-exponential T2 relaxometry was used to generate bi-exponential T2 maps, coupled with a classification scheme to identify the different T2 homogeneous zones within the tubers. Six classes with statistically different relaxation parameters were identified at each sampling date, allowing the defects and the pith and cortex tissues to be detected. A further distinction could be made between three constitutive elements within the flesh, revealing the heterogeneity of this particular tissue. Relaxation parameters for each class and their evolution during storage were successfully analyzed. The work demonstrated the value of MRI for detailed non-invasive plant tissue characterization. Full article
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