Special Issue "Beverage Packaging 2019"

A special issue of Beverages (ISSN 2306-5710).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2019

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Markus Schmid

Albstadt-Sigmaringen University, 72488 Sigmaringen, Germany
Website | E-Mail
Interests: Food packaging technology; Food Processing; Food Preservation; Process Technology and Process Design in Life Sciences
Guest Editor
Dr. Frank Welle

Fraunhofer Institute for Process Engineering and Packaging IVV, Department Product Safety and Analytics, Freising, Germany
Website 1 | Website 2 | E-Mail
Interests: food contact materials: migration testing; permeation testing and diffusion and modelling; diffusion of substances in polymers; non-intentionally added substances (NIAS); functional barrier testing

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Beverage packaging uses several types of materials and components, including rigid and flexible plastics, paper and board, rigid metal, glass, closures, and labels. A variety of packaging types, such as bottles, cans, pouches, and cartons, are available, and this market is expected to continue growing.

Beverage packaging is an interesting field for many innovations such as active and intelligent packaging materials. For example, active oxygen scavengers are already introduced for sensitive beverages like juices or beer. In addition, new materials from renewable resources are being developed with potential benefits for beverage packaging. For instance, PEF is considered as a sustainable alternative for PET in beverage packaging concepts.

Beverage packaging uses a wide variety of packaging materials and technologies. This makes beverage packaging an interesting research field with a high potential for new packaging innovations. This Special Issue aims to build a platform to discuss the most resent state-of-the-art research applications and progress in beverage packaging.

We sincerely invite high-quality original research and review papers on both experimental and theoretical works addressing this topic:

Potential topics include, but are not limited to:

  • Beverage packaging materials
  • Filling technology
  • Active and/or intelligent packaging concepts
  • Beverage packaging sustainability
  • Biopolymers for beverage packaging
  • Recycling of beverage packaging
  • Sensory properties of packed beverages
  • Food law compliance testing
  • Improved shelf-life of packed beverages
  • Industry 4.0 in beverage packaging operations
  • Beverage packaging process technology and process design

Prof. Dr. Markus Schmid
Dr. Frank Welle
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Beverages is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 350 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (2 papers)

View options order results:
result details:
Displaying articles 1-2
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Open AccessArticle
Migration of Bisphenol A from Can Coatings into Beverages at the End of Shelf Life Compared to Regulated Test Conditions
Received: 10 December 2018 / Revised: 26 December 2018 / Accepted: 29 December 2018 / Published: 7 January 2019
PDF Full-text (602 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Beverage cans are used for energy drinks, soft-drinks, sparkling waters, and beer. Bisphenol A is still part of the formulation of epoxy coatings of beverage cans. Due to concerns that bisphenol A acts as an endocrine-active substance, the migration of bisphenol A is [...] Read more.
Beverage cans are used for energy drinks, soft-drinks, sparkling waters, and beer. Bisphenol A is still part of the formulation of epoxy coatings of beverage cans. Due to concerns that bisphenol A acts as an endocrine-active substance, the migration of bisphenol A is restricted. Typically, the migration from beverage cans is tested at elevated temperatures into food simulants, like 20% ethanol in water. However, comparison tests of the migration of bisphenol A at the end of shelf life, with the migration into ethanolic food simulants, are not available in the scientific literature. The aim of the study was to determine the migration of the migration of bisphenol A into real beverages, compared to routine migration tests into the European official food simulant of 20% ethanol at 40 °C and 60 °C after storage for 10 days. As a result, bisphenol A-containing coatings show a considerably higher migration when tested at 60 °C in comparison to 40 °C. On the other hand, migration into energy drinks and coke, from the same coatings at the end of shelf life when stored at room temperature, was below the detection limit in either case. As expected, migration values of bisphenol A below the analytical detection limits were observed for any test conditions from the coating labeled bisphenol A-free. Spiking tests show that bisphenol A is stable in real beverages. Therefore, it can be concluded that the accelerated migration tests with 20% ethanol at the test conditions 10 d at 40 °C and 10 d at 60 °C significantly overestimate the real migration into beverages at the end of shelf life. This overestimation of the migration of bisphenol A is due to swelling of the epoxy can coating by the ethanolic food simulant. These findings were supported by migration modeling based on diffusion coefficients predicted for polyethylene terephthalate. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Beverage Packaging 2019)
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Evolution of Phenolic Compound Profiles and Antioxidant Activity of Syrah Red and Sparkling Moscatel Wines Stored in Bottles of Different Colors
Received: 2 September 2018 / Revised: 8 November 2018 / Accepted: 9 November 2018 / Published: 15 November 2018
PDF Full-text (1095 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of storage time and bottle color on the phenolic compound profiles of Syrah red and sparkling Moscatel wines stored for 12 months in green, amber, and clear bottles. The profile of the phenolic [...] Read more.
The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of storage time and bottle color on the phenolic compound profiles of Syrah red and sparkling Moscatel wines stored for 12 months in green, amber, and clear bottles. The profile of the phenolic compounds and their antioxidant activity in vitro were determined. Commercial wines were bottled in an automatic filling machine and closed with natural cork. After the bottling process, the wines were stored vertically on shelves which received natural light indirectly (±8 h/day), at temperatures which varied from 24 to 30 °C and relative humidity 40–65%. The wines were analyzed every three months over one year. Several phenolic compound families were quantified through reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) coupled to diode-array detection (DAD) and fluorescence detection (FD). The different bottle colors studied had not influenced the evolution of the sparkling Moscatel and Syrah red wines. The main variations obtained were related to storage time. The main changes were observed in the Syrah wine, where storage time was associated with an increase in hue (h*), decrease in catechin and epicatechin, and most notably, a decrease in the anthocyanin malvidin 3-glucoside. The sparkling Moscatel wine did not show important changes in most phenolic compounds; however, the catechin increased significantly during storage and this increase was similar in bottles of all colors. In general, the wines were stable in relation to the antioxidant activity in vitro. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Beverage Packaging 2019)
Figures

Figure 1

Beverages EISSN 2306-5710 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top