Featured Papers in Wine, Spirits and Oenological Products Section

A special issue of Beverages (ISSN 2306-5710). This special issue belongs to the section "Wine, Spirits and Oenological Products".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 December 2022) | Viewed by 57670

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition, Agricultural University of Athens, Iera Odos 75, 11855 Athens, Greece
Interests: wine chemistry; polyphenolic compounds; astringency; sensory analysis; antioxidant activity
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Guest Editor
Department of Agronomy, Food, Natural Resources, Animals & Environment, Università di Padova, Legnaro, PD, Italy
Interests: wine science and technology; wine stabilization; analytical chemistry; wine proteins; sensory analysis
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The Special Issue "Featured Papers Wine, Spirits and Oenological Products Section" will present a collection of feature papers on recent developments in the production and quality of wines, spirits, vinegars and other oenological products, starting from grape maturity and harvest to the completion of alcoholic fermentation (and malolactic fermentation, if used, or acetic fermentation, for vinegar), distillation (for spirits), maturation, stabilization treatments and ageing.

The Special Issue seeks papers that feature original research, as well as review articles. The journal offers high-quality peer review and a rapid publication process. Submission to this Special Issue is now open and will remain open until 30 December 2022. Invited papers may be considered for full or partial waiver of the publication cost. If you would like to be invited to contribute to this Special Issue, please send the (tentative) title and abstract of your potential paper/review to the Guest Editor listed below. We are looking forward to receiving your contribution.

Prof. Dr. Stamatina Kallithraka
Prof. Dr. Matteo Marangon
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Beverages is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (10 papers)

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Research

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11 pages, 1046 KiB  
Article
Wine Cork Closures Impacts on Dimethyl Sulfide (DMS) and Precursors (DMSP) Equilibrium of Different Shiraz Wines during Accelerated Bottle Ageing
by Rémi De La Burgade, Valérie Nolleau, Teddy Godet, Nicolas Galy, Dimitri Tixador, Christophe Loisel, Nicolas Sommerer and Aurélie Roland
Beverages 2023, 9(1), 15; https://doi.org/10.3390/beverages9010015 - 6 Feb 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1929
Abstract
Dimethyl sulfide (DMS) is a flavor compound, characteristic of the truffle aroma in red wines, and is well-known to be a fruity exhauster. DMS comes from the degradation of dimethyl sulfide potential (DMSP) during winemaking. Up to now, little is known about the [...] Read more.
Dimethyl sulfide (DMS) is a flavor compound, characteristic of the truffle aroma in red wines, and is well-known to be a fruity exhauster. DMS comes from the degradation of dimethyl sulfide potential (DMSP) during winemaking. Up to now, little is known about the role of the closure on the DMSP degradation during ageing. For that purpose, the effect of four micro-agglomerated wine cork closures was studied on the DMS/DMSP equilibrium, along with six other volatile sulfur compounds (VSC), was investigated in six Shiraz wines. After three months of accelerated bottle ageing, DMS levels increased significantly in all bottles. The most permeable closures induced a lesser accumulation of DMS, suggesting that DMS could be dependent on the redox status of the wine. At the same time, the DMSP decrease was proportional to the permeability of the closures. For the first time, a possible implication of closure permeability on DMSP degradation was observed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Featured Papers in Wine, Spirits and Oenological Products Section)
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16 pages, 1234 KiB  
Article
A Sustainable Approach Based on the Use of Unripe Grape Frozen Musts to Modulate Wine Characteristics as a Proof of Concept
by Catarina Pereira, Davide Mendes, Nuno Martins, Marco Gomes da Silva, Raquel Garcia and Maria João Cabrita
Beverages 2022, 8(4), 79; https://doi.org/10.3390/beverages8040079 - 7 Dec 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1957
Abstract
Aiming to develop a sustainable methodology for must acidity correction in winemaking, particularly needed in warm regions, the present study intends to fulfill the circular economy values. Antão Vaz white wines were produced using two different strategies for must acidity correction: (i) the [...] Read more.
Aiming to develop a sustainable methodology for must acidity correction in winemaking, particularly needed in warm regions, the present study intends to fulfill the circular economy values. Antão Vaz white wines were produced using two different strategies for must acidity correction: (i) the addition of a mixture of organic acids (Mix*) commonly used in winemaking; and (ii) the addition of previously produced unripe grape must (UM*) from the same grape variety. In addition, a testimonial (T*) sample was produced with no acidity correction. For all wines produced, oenological parameters were determined, and both amino acid (AA) content and volatile composition were evaluated. A higher AA content was found in the Antão Vaz T* wine, followed by UM* wines. The volatile profile was also affected, and LDA demonstrates a clear separation of wines with different acidity corrections. Results obtained indicate that unripe grape musts—a vital waste product containing several compounds with important biological activity—can be used to increase musts acidity without a negative impact on wine characteristics. Furthermore, this work also shows that the use of unripe must may be a valuable tool for reducing the alcoholic content of wines. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Featured Papers in Wine, Spirits and Oenological Products Section)
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14 pages, 2840 KiB  
Article
Decoding the Proanthocyanins Profile of Italian Red Wines
by Panagiotis Arapitsas, Daniele Perenzoni, Maurizio Ugliano, Davide Slaghenaufi, Simone Giacosa, Maria Alessandra Paissoni, Paola Piombino, Elisabetta Pittari, Andrea Versari, Arianna Ricci, Andrea Curioni, Matteo Marangon and Fulvio Mattivi
Beverages 2022, 8(4), 76; https://doi.org/10.3390/beverages8040076 - 25 Nov 2022
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 2495
Abstract
The Italian wine appellations system is organized in hundreds of origin wines, with unique characteristics that are protected with many denominations of origin. The aim of this work was to analyze and compare the proanthocyanin profile of 12 single-cultivar and single-vintage Italian red [...] Read more.
The Italian wine appellations system is organized in hundreds of origin wines, with unique characteristics that are protected with many denominations of origin. The aim of this work was to analyze and compare the proanthocyanin profile of 12 single-cultivar and single-vintage Italian red wine groups (Aglianico from Campania, Cannonau from Sardinia, Corvina from Veneto, Montepulciano from Abruzzo, Nebbiolo from Piedmont, Nerello Mascalese from Sicily, Primitivo from Apulia, Raboso Piave from Veneto, Sagrantino from Umbria, Sangiovese from Tuscany and Romagna, and Teroldego from Trentino), each one produced in their terroirs under ad hoc legal frameworks to guarantee their quality and origin. All wines were analyzed with a protocol that combined the phloroglucinolysis reaction with an LC-MS/MS instrument. The results underlined Sagrantino wines as the richest in proanthocyanins. Sangiovese, Montepulciano, Nerello, and Teroldego were the richest in B-ring trihydroxylated flavan-3-ols, and especially Nerello was the richest in prodelphinidins. Cannonau, Raboso Piave, Nerello, and Corvina were characterized by C-ring trans conformation flavan-3-ols. Nebbiolo and Corvina had high percentages of galloylated flavan-3-ols. Aglianico and Primitivo had the lowest percentages of B-ring trihydroxylated and C-ring trans conformation flavan-3-ols. This information should be useful in better understanding the Italian red wines and valorize them. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Featured Papers in Wine, Spirits and Oenological Products Section)
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15 pages, 2806 KiB  
Article
Non-Thermal High Pressure Processing, Pulsed Electric Fields and Ultrasound Preservation of Five Different Table Wines
by Sanelle van Wyk, Lewis Hong and Filipa V. M. Silva
Beverages 2021, 7(4), 69; https://doi.org/10.3390/beverages7040069 - 11 Oct 2021
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 2996
Abstract
Wine preservation by alternative non-thermal and physical methods including high pressure processing (HPP), pulsed electric fields (PEF) and power ultrasound (US) technologies was investigated. The effect of these technologies on some quality parameters of five table wines was determined directly after processing and [...] Read more.
Wine preservation by alternative non-thermal and physical methods including high pressure processing (HPP), pulsed electric fields (PEF) and power ultrasound (US) technologies was investigated. The effect of these technologies on some quality parameters of five table wines was determined directly after processing and two months storage. For each wine, the pH, colour density, total phenolic content and antioxidant activity quality parameters were determined and the different treatments were compared. The pH of the untreated and treated wines generally remained unchanged after processing and storage. The antioxidant activity of the wines decreased after processing and storage. Generally, non-thermal processing did not affect the wine quality parameters during the 2 months storage. Overall, this study demonstrated that HPP had the smallest effect on the quality parameters assessed in five different wines. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Featured Papers in Wine, Spirits and Oenological Products Section)
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14 pages, 2433 KiB  
Article
Detection of Red Wine Faults over Time with Flash Profiling and the Electronic Tongue
by Victoria D. Paup, Tara Cook-Barton, Charles Diako, Charles G. Edwards and Carolyn F. Ross
Beverages 2021, 7(3), 52; https://doi.org/10.3390/beverages7030052 - 21 Jul 2021
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 3692
Abstract
Wine faults, often caused by spoilage microorganisms, are considered negative sensory attributes, and may result in substantial economic losses. The objective of this study was to use the electronic tongue (e-tongue) and flash sensory profiling (FP) to evaluate changes in red wine over [...] Read more.
Wine faults, often caused by spoilage microorganisms, are considered negative sensory attributes, and may result in substantial economic losses. The objective of this study was to use the electronic tongue (e-tongue) and flash sensory profiling (FP) to evaluate changes in red wine over time due to the presence of different spoilage microorganisms. Merlot wine was inoculated with one of the following microorganisms: Brettanomyces bruxellensis, Lactobacillus brevis, Pediococcus parvulus, or Acetobacter pasteurianus. These wines were analyzed weekly until Day 42 using the e-tongue and FP, with microbial plate counts. Over time, both FP and e-tongue differentiated the wines. The e-tongue showed a low discrimination among microorganisms up to Day 14 of storage. However, at Day 21 and continuing to Day 42, the e-tongue discriminated among the samples with a discrimination index of 91. From the sensory FP data, assessors discriminated among the wines starting at Day 28. Non-spoilage terms were used to describe the wines at significantly higher frequency for all time points until Day 42, at which point the use of spoilage terms was significantly higher (p < 0.05). These results suggest that application of these novel techniques may be the key to detecting and limiting financial losses associated with wine faults. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Featured Papers in Wine, Spirits and Oenological Products Section)
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10 pages, 432 KiB  
Article
Amelioration of Smoke Taint in Cabernet Sauvignon Wine via Post-Harvest Ozonation of Grapes
by Margherita Modesti, Colleen Szeto, Renata Ristic, WenWen Jiang, Julie Culbert, Cesare Catelli, Fabio Mencarelli, Pietro Tonutti and Kerry Wilkinson
Beverages 2021, 7(3), 44; https://doi.org/10.3390/beverages7030044 - 1 Jul 2021
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 4133
Abstract
Strategies that mitigate the negative effects of vineyard exposure to smoke on wine composition and sensory properties are needed to address the recurring incidence of bushfires in or near wine regions. Recent research demonstrated the potential for post-harvest ozonation of moderately smoke-exposed grapes [...] Read more.
Strategies that mitigate the negative effects of vineyard exposure to smoke on wine composition and sensory properties are needed to address the recurring incidence of bushfires in or near wine regions. Recent research demonstrated the potential for post-harvest ozonation of moderately smoke-exposed grapes to reduce both the concentration of smoke taint marker compounds (i.e., volatile phenols and their glycosides) and the perceived intensity of smoke taint in wine, depending on the dose and duration of ozone treatment. The current study further evaluated the efficacy of ozonation as a method for the amelioration of smoke taint in wine by comparing the chemical and sensory consequences of post-harvest ozonation (at 1 ppm for 24 h) of Cabernet Sauvignon grapes following grapevine exposure to dense smoke, i.e., ozone treatment of more heavily tainted grapes. Ozonation again yielded significant reductions in the concentration of free and glycosylated volatile phenols—up to 25% and 30%, respectively. However, although the intensities of smoke-related sensory attributes were generally lower in wines made with smoke-exposed grapes that were ozonated (compared to wines made with smoke-exposed grapes that were not ozonated), the results were not statistically significant. This suggests that the efficacy of ozone treatment depends on the extent to which grapes have been tainted by smoke. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Featured Papers in Wine, Spirits and Oenological Products Section)
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14 pages, 648 KiB  
Article
Aroma and Sensory Profiles of Sauvignon Blanc Wines from Commercially Produced Free Run and Pressed Juices
by Katie Parish-Virtue, Mandy Herbst-Johnstone, Flo Bouda, Bruno Fedrizzi, Rebecca C. Deed and Paul A. Kilmartin
Beverages 2021, 7(2), 29; https://doi.org/10.3390/beverages7020029 - 25 May 2021
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 4911
Abstract
Sauvignon blanc is the most important grape cultivar within the New Zealand wine industry, and wines from the Marlborough region are renowned for their intense aromas including tropical, passionfruit, and green capsicum. Quality Sauvignon blanc wines are usually made from free run juice, [...] Read more.
Sauvignon blanc is the most important grape cultivar within the New Zealand wine industry, and wines from the Marlborough region are renowned for their intense aromas including tropical, passionfruit, and green capsicum. Quality Sauvignon blanc wines are usually made from free run juice, although press fractions can be included. The chemical aroma composition and sensory profiles of two wine sets made from three press fractions (free run, light press and heavy press) were compared. The compounds 3-mercaptohexan-1-ol and 3-mercaptohexyl acetate were found to decrease between free run and heavily pressed wines while hexyl acetate, hexanol, and benzyl alcohol increased. The accompanying sensory analysis showed that free run wines were marked by aromas of Passionfruit/sweaty, Boxwood and Fresh green capsicum, while the heavy pressed wines were described by French vanilla/bourbon, Floral and Banana lolly attributes, consistent with the aroma chemical composition. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Featured Papers in Wine, Spirits and Oenological Products Section)
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24 pages, 2413 KiB  
Article
An Assessment of the Competitive Position of the Emergent Uruguayan Wine Industry: A Preliminary Netnographic Baseline Study
by Angelo A. Camillo and Woo Gon Kim
Beverages 2021, 7(2), 26; https://doi.org/10.3390/beverages7020026 - 20 May 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 4465
Abstract
This study investigates the competitive position of the Uruguayan wine industry and its potential to become a player in the global wine trade. The study adopts an exploratory, holistic, and qualitative research design, applying desk research, cyberethnography, and electronic correspondence with stakeholders. The [...] Read more.
This study investigates the competitive position of the Uruguayan wine industry and its potential to become a player in the global wine trade. The study adopts an exploratory, holistic, and qualitative research design, applying desk research, cyberethnography, and electronic correspondence with stakeholders. The research, based on the theory of global business competitiveness, aims to determine the opportunities Uruguay’s wine industry could exploit, based on its competencies, to become a player in the worldwide wine business landscape. The results show that Uruguay is a young wine-producing country; however, it has the potential to become a global competitor. Critical factors identified in the study are geographic location, favorable climate, terrain, hydropower and the high density of the hydrographic network, available agricultural land, the available and well-educated workforce, unique land infrastructure, and the newness of the grape varietal (Tannat) being introduced to the world market with promising results. The paper contributes to the body of knowledge of competitive strategy in wine business research and adds to the scarce literature on the Uruguayan wine industry. Finally, it assesses Uruguay’s current positioning of wine production and competitiveness. The results will benefit stakeholders in the Uruguayan wine industry, researchers, and practitioners in the field. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Featured Papers in Wine, Spirits and Oenological Products Section)
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18 pages, 346 KiB  
Review
Chemical Composition and Polyphenolic Compounds of Red Wines: Their Antioxidant Activities and Effects on Human Health—A Review
by Boris Nemzer, Diganta Kalita, Alexander Y. Yashin and Yakov I. Yashin
Beverages 2022, 8(1), 1; https://doi.org/10.3390/beverages8010001 - 28 Dec 2021
Cited by 30 | Viewed by 17377
Abstract
Red wine, an alcoholic beverage is composed of a spectrum of complex compounds such as water, alcohol, glycerol, organic acid, carbohydrates, polyphenols, and minerals as well as volatile compounds. Major factors that affect the levels of phenolic compounds in red wines are the [...] Read more.
Red wine, an alcoholic beverage is composed of a spectrum of complex compounds such as water, alcohol, glycerol, organic acid, carbohydrates, polyphenols, and minerals as well as volatile compounds. Major factors that affect the levels of phenolic compounds in red wines are the variety of grapes and the storage of the wines. Among the constituents of red wine, phenolic compounds play a crucial role in attributes including color and mouthfeel and confer beneficial properties on health. Most importantly, phenolic compounds such as flavanols, flavonols, flavanones, flavones, tannins, anthocyanins, hydroxycinnamic acids, hydroxybenzoic acids, and resveratrol can prevent the development of cardiovascular diseases, cancers, diabetes, inflammation, and some other chronic diseases. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Featured Papers in Wine, Spirits and Oenological Products Section)
18 pages, 484 KiB  
Review
The Impact Packaging Type Has on the Flavor of Wine
by Katherine A. Thompson-Witrick, Eric R. Pitts, John L. Nemenyi and Drew Budner
Beverages 2021, 7(2), 36; https://doi.org/10.3390/beverages7020036 - 7 Jun 2021
Cited by 12 | Viewed by 12143
Abstract
This is a literature review of the most commonly available wine packaging categories. This includes glass bottles, polyethylene terephthalate bottles (PET), bag-in-box (BIB), aluminum cans, and Tetra Pak. This review includes a description and history of each category. In addition, the market share [...] Read more.
This is a literature review of the most commonly available wine packaging categories. This includes glass bottles, polyethylene terephthalate bottles (PET), bag-in-box (BIB), aluminum cans, and Tetra Pak. This review includes a description and history of each category. In addition, the market share and environmental impacts of each category are discussed. Special attention is paid to the reported impact on packaged wine flavor and aroma for each packaging type. Finally, the potential impacts on consumer preference are discussed. While glass is still the dominant packaging material within the wine industry and by consumer demand, economic and environmental concerns are driving the industry and consumers to investigate and adopt alternative packaging materials. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Featured Papers in Wine, Spirits and Oenological Products Section)
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