Special Issue "Building Information Modelling: Disrupting Team Building and Teamwork on Construction Projects"

A special issue of Applied Sciences (ISSN 2076-3417). This special issue belongs to the section "Civil Engineering".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (29 February 2020).

Special Issue Editors

Dr. M. Reza Hosseini
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Architecture and Built Environment, Deakin University, Victoria, Australia
Interests: digital engineering; building information modeling (BIM); Internet of Things (IoT); Industry 4.0
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. David John Edwards
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Engineering and the Built Environment, Birmingham City University, City Centre Campus, Millennium Point, Birmingham B4 7XG, UK
Interests: construction; construction technology; BIM; artificial neural networks; computer science
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Josua Pienaar
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Pro Vice-Chancellor (Learning and Teaching), Central Queensland University, 554/700 Yaamba Road, Norman Gardens 4701, Australia
Interests: Building Information Modelling education; learning and teaching; built environment; business strategy; entrepreneurship; higher education management

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Building information modelling (BIM) is widely regarded as one of the most influential innovations impacting on the construction and civil engineering industry in recent years. Indeed, BIM has been extensively sold as the panacea to industry’s perennial problems, namely: (i) poor project management team and stakeholder (such as the client and facilities management team) engagement; and (ii) the mismanagement of project information and documentation. Indisputably, BIM can have a substantial positive impact throughout the project lifecycle of a building or infrastructure development, as well as its various stages (including design, procurement, pre-fabrication, construction, and facility management). However, the progressive and exponential growth of BIM usage within contemporary businesses and throughout the industry induces changes of a phenomenal scale. This places strain on the existing skills and knowledge levels of practitioners who have to utilize or manage this digital software innovation. Therefore, whilst the BIM revolution offers a latent potential to improve sector performance, it can also (when used inappropriately) cause massive disruption to the manner in which project management teams form and work together, methods of linking and maintaining collaboration among individual project management team members, and protocols for transferring and processing project data to and from these (often geographically dispersed) members. The convergence of BIM with virtual and augmented reality, the Internet of Things (IoT), artificial intelligence, and the technical advancements in Web and cloud computing will further exacerbate the disruption in the current practices of team building and teamwork on BIM-enabled projects. Despite the scale of disruption experienced by practitioners, the true impact upon team building and teamwork remain relatively unknown, and are often subject to speculation or anecdote.

This Special Issue of Applied Sciences provides a global manifesto specifically devoted to attracting the disparate efforts of the world’s leading BIM researchers on investigating and quantifying the multifaceted dimensions of this disruption. Concomitant objectives are as follows: to provide an international platform to showcase emergent findings and contribute to generating new knowledge on areas related to team work and collaboration on BIM-enabled projects; explore emerging technologies that affect teams on BIM-enabled projects, and provide case studies of change management to improve the effectives of teams on BIM-enabled projects; and report on how BIM disrupts and transforms current team relations with supply chain partners.

This Special Issue welcomes various submission types, such as original research contributions, case studies, comparative studies, conceptual papers, and review studies in the following broad areas, namely:

  • Overcoming the issues posed by intellectual property rights (IPR);
  • Building an effective “virtual project management team”;
  • Resolving interoperability issues;
  • Mitigating design and construction clashes;
  • Employing applications of Industry 4.0 within a BIM-enabled project;
  • Educating the future BIM-enabled workforce;
  • Reducing barriers to maintaining collaboration on BIM-enabled projects;
  • Enhancing knowledge, skills, and abilities associated with collaboration on BIM-enabled projects;
  • Using collaboration tools and technologies on BIM-enabled projects; and
  • Managing data between BIM and other technologies, and methods such as facilities management tools and enterprise resource planning systems.

Potential contributors should note that this list is not exhaustive, and that further guidance can be obtained from the Special Issue editor (Email: [email protected]).

Dr. M. Reza Hosseini
Prof. Dr. David John Edwards
Prof. Dr. Josua Pienaar
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Applied Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Industry 4.0
  • building information modelling (BIM)
  • collaboration
  • teams
  • networks
  • disruption
  • change management

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Article
BIM-LEAN as a Methodology to Save Execution Costs in Building Construction—An Experience under the Spanish Framework
Appl. Sci. 2020, 10(6), 1913; https://doi.org/10.3390/app10061913 - 11 Mar 2020
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 1316
Abstract
Current market conditions characterized by technological changes, increasing regulatory requirements and low funding make current construction management models obsolete. This tendency affects not only the private housing market but also public administration projects, which have large time and budget deviations across the board. [...] Read more.
Current market conditions characterized by technological changes, increasing regulatory requirements and low funding make current construction management models obsolete. This tendency affects not only the private housing market but also public administration projects, which have large time and budget deviations across the board. As a result, new approaches are needed to improve the efficiency of the construction process, removing extra costs and delivering projects on time. The most representative trends in the construction industry that enable such improvements are both Building Information Modelling paradigm (BIM) and Lean Construction philosophy with one of its associated tools in the field of construction management—the Last Planner System. However, a review of the literature shows the scarcity of works on the synergy of both paradigms taking into account the extensive literature on Lean and BIM individually. This is further accused if we look beyond the theoretical literature reviews. Therefore, this paper is focused on the benefits derived from the synergy of both disciplines and the impacts on project efficiency through a case study of a public construction project at the university of Alicante in order to provide empirical evidence of the benefits and improvements of using BIM at the Look Ahead meetings and of the Last Planner System. Finally, the results of the case study allow us to make a comparison with the data related to cost deviations of other public projects with different uses, built areas, and complexity which were managed with traditional methods of construction. Full article
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Article
Productivity Analysis of Documentation Based on 3D Model in Plant Facility Construction Project
Appl. Sci. 2020, 10(3), 1126; https://doi.org/10.3390/app10031126 - 07 Feb 2020
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 751
Abstract
In off-site construction, production of fabrication drawings has a very important impact on productivity. Documentation using 3D model is one of the great advantages of using BIM. Despite the importance of documentation based on 3D model, productivity analysis studies compared to traditional 2D-drawing-based [...] Read more.
In off-site construction, production of fabrication drawings has a very important impact on productivity. Documentation using 3D model is one of the great advantages of using BIM. Despite the importance of documentation based on 3D model, productivity analysis studies compared to traditional 2D-drawing-based documentation method are difficult to find in existing studies. In addition, empirical research on the effects of recycling 3D model and libraries information is hard to find. The purpose of this study is to analyze the productivity of documentation using 3D model in the fabrication phase. First, productivity data for the 2D-drawing-based documentation method and 3D-model-based documentation method for steel frame prefabrication of EPC project were acquired for each module. Second, additional time for tasks—such as 3D modeling and document review—were investigated to conduct the comparative analysis on the productivity of the two documentation methods. The results quantitatively show the productivity of 3D-model-based documentation and the learning effect of recycling 3D libraries. Full article
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Article
Developing Project Managers’ Transversal Competences Using Building Information Modeling
Appl. Sci. 2019, 9(19), 4006; https://doi.org/10.3390/app9194006 - 25 Sep 2019
Cited by 13 | Viewed by 1587
Abstract
The emergence of building information modeling (BIM) methodology requires the training of professionals with both specific and transversal skills. In this paper, a project-based learning experience carried out in the context of a project management course at the University of Extremadura is analyzed. [...] Read more.
The emergence of building information modeling (BIM) methodology requires the training of professionals with both specific and transversal skills. In this paper, a project-based learning experience carried out in the context of a project management course at the University of Extremadura is analyzed. To that end, a questionnaire was designed and given to students who participated in the initiative. Results suggest that BIM can be considered a virtual learning environment, from which students value the competences developed. The emotional performance observed was quite flat. Similarly, students valued the usefulness of the initiative. Students expressed a desire for the methodological change of the university classes, and thought that BIM methodology could be useful for other courses. The results obtained show a line of work to be done to improve the training of students and university teaching. Full article
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