Food Safety: Antimicrobial Resistance in the Food Chain

A special issue of Antibiotics (ISSN 2079-6382).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 June 2023) | Viewed by 5716

Special Issue Editors


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Animal Breeding and Food Safety Department, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Agricultural Sciences and Veterinary Medicine, Manastur Street No. 3/5, 400372 Cluj-Napoca, Romania
Interests: food microbiology; food inspection; food technology

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The ongoing spread of bacterial antimicrobial resistance has not only become a health issue but also a growing food-safety concern. There is a clear link between the use and misuse of antibacterial agents in animals and their spread in the environment. Foodborne diseases caused by pathogenic bacteria such as Salmonella, Campylobacter, and Listeria spp pose a greater problem in case of possible treatment failure. It is also important to surveil the bacterial load within the production chain, given the risk posed by non-pathogenic or commensal bacteria which can carry and further transfer resistance genes. Preventing and controlling antibiotic resistance is difficult, but having more knowledge on the possible emergence, spread, and transfer within the food chain would help in taking further steps. That is why this Special Issue is focused on publishing multidisciplinary research that focuses on this complex issue. We encourage the publishing of all important and updated results in the field of food microbiology, antimicrobial resistance mechanisms in food borne bacteria, characterization of antimicrobial resistance patterns, and characterization of bacterial resistance in various classes of antibiotics.

Dr. Alexandra Tǎbǎran
Prof. Dr. Sorin Dan
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Antibiotics is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (2 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

10 pages, 269 KiB  
Article
Concerning Increase in Antimicrobial Resistance Patterns of Pathogenic Strains of Salmonella Isolated in Poultry Meat Products
by Anca Forgaciu, Alexandra Tabaran, Liora Colobatiu, Romolica Mihaiu, Sorin Daniel Dan and Marian Mihaiu
Antibiotics 2022, 11(11), 1469; https://doi.org/10.3390/antibiotics11111469 - 25 Oct 2022
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1539
Abstract
Salmonella is considered to be one of the major foodborne pathogens associated with the consumption of contaminated poultry meat products. To the best of our knowledge this is the first extended research performed on a number of Salmonella strains isolated during 2011–2021 from [...] Read more.
Salmonella is considered to be one of the major foodborne pathogens associated with the consumption of contaminated poultry meat products. To the best of our knowledge this is the first extended research performed on a number of Salmonella strains isolated during 2011–2021 from poultry meat products in Romania. The aim of this study was to characterize the prevalence of pathogenic Salmonella serovars, antimicrobial susceptibility, and antimicrobial resistance genes in 112 Salmonella isolates recovered from raw poultry meat products. The results showed that Salmonella enterica serovars Enteritidis and Typhimurium were the common serotypes (56%; 25%). Overall, the majority of the isolates were resistant to at least three tested antimicrobials. High resistance was observed for tetracycline (84%), nalidixic acid (78%), and ampicillin (78%) in pathogenic Salmonella isolated during the period 2016–2021. All the pathogenic Salmonella isolated during 2016–2021 tested positive to at least one resistance gene encoding for tetracycline resistance, with the tetA gene being the most prevalent (62%). In addition, 64% (24/37) of the Salmonella isolates carried at least one of the genes (blaCMY-2, blaSHV1, blaTEM1) that code for β-Lactams resistance. The findings in this study showed a high prevalence of multi-drug resistant (MDR) Salmonella serovars in poultry meat products and a concerning increase of resistance patterns. The continuous occurrence of more resistant strains implies that effective measures should be strictly applied in this particular food chain in order to prevent their spread and guarantee microbial safety. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Food Safety: Antimicrobial Resistance in the Food Chain)

Review

Jump to: Research

51 pages, 2383 KiB  
Review
Multiresidues Multiclass Analytical Methods for Determination of Antibiotics in Animal Origin Food: A Critical Analysis
by Sílvia Cruz Barros, Ana Sanches Silva and Duarte Torres
Antibiotics 2023, 12(2), 202; https://doi.org/10.3390/antibiotics12020202 - 18 Jan 2023
Cited by 14 | Viewed by 3612
Abstract
Veterinary drugs are widely used to prevent and treat diseases. The European Union has forbidden the use of antibiotics as growth promoters since 2006. Its abusive use leads to the presence of antibiotic residues (AR) in foods of animal origin which is associated [...] Read more.
Veterinary drugs are widely used to prevent and treat diseases. The European Union has forbidden the use of antibiotics as growth promoters since 2006. Its abusive use leads to the presence of antibiotic residues (AR) in foods of animal origin which is associated with antibiotic resistance. The monitoring of AR in food intended for human consumption is of utmost importance to assure Food Safety. A systematic bibliographic review was carried out on the analytical methodologies, published in 2013, for the determination of AR in foods of animal origin. The food processing effect in the AR detected in animal products is also addressed. However, there is a preference for multiresidues multiclass methods, i.e., methodologies that allow determining simultaneously different classes of antibiotics, which is still a challenge for researchers. The wide diversity of physico-chemical properties of these drugs is an obstacle to achieving excellent analytical performance for a vast number of molecules analyzed concurrently. New techniques in sample preparation continue to be developed in order to obtain a compromise between good recoveries and extracts without interferences (clean extracts). The most widely used analytical methodology for the determination of AR is liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry. However, the current trend is focused on the use of powerful high-resolution MS detectors such as Time of Flight and Orbitrap with modern chromatographic systems. Cooking time and temperature control are the key processing conditions influencing the reduction of AR in foods. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Food Safety: Antimicrobial Resistance in the Food Chain)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop