Special Issue "Antimicrobial Resistance and Virulence Mechanisms"

A special issue of Antibiotics (ISSN 2079-6382). This special issue belongs to the section "Mechanism and Evolution of Antibiotic Resistance".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 28 February 2021.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Manuela Oliveira
Website
Guest Editor
Centre for Interdisciplinary Research in Animal Health (CIISA), Faculty of Veterinary Medicine of the University of Lisbon (FMV/ULisbon), Portugal
Interests: antimicrobial resistance; antibiotic alternatives; diabetic foot infections; biofilms; clinical veterinary microbiology; environmental microbiology

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The emergence of antimicrobial-resistant bacteria, particularly those resistant to last-resource antibiotics, is now a common problem and has been defined as one of the three priorities for the safeguarding of One Health by the Tripartite Alliance, which includes the World Health Organization (WHO), the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), and the Office International des Epizooties (OIE). Bacterial resistance profiles, together with the expression of specific virulence markers, have a major influence on infectious disease outcomes. These bacterial traits are interconnected, since not only may the presence of antibiotics influence bacterial virulence gene expression and, consequently, infection pathogenesis, but some virulence factors may also contribute to an increased ability to resist bacteria, as observed in biofilm-producing strains. Surveillance of important resistant and virulent clones and associated mobile genetic elements is essential to decision-making in terms of mitigation measures to be applied for the prevention of such infections in both human and veterinary medicine. However, the role of natural environments as important components of the dissemination cycle of these strains has been disregarded until recently. This Special Issue aims to publish manuscripts that contribute to our understanding of the impact of bacterial antimicrobial resistance and virulence in the three areas of the One Health triad, i.e., animal, human, and environmental health.

Dr. Manuela Oliveira
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Antibiotics is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • antimicrobial resistance
  • bacterial virulence
  • biofilms
  • epidemiology
  • genomics
  • infections pathogenesis
  • One Health

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Genetic Characterization of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Isolates from Human Bloodstream Infections: Detection of MLSB Resistance
Antibiotics 2020, 9(7), 375; https://doi.org/10.3390/antibiotics9070375 - 03 Jul 2020
Abstract
In this study we aimed to characterize antimicrobial resistance in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) isolated from bloodstream infections as well as the associated genetic lineages of the isolates. Sixteen MRSA isolates were recovered from bacteremia samples from inpatients between 2016 and 2019. The [...] Read more.
In this study we aimed to characterize antimicrobial resistance in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) isolated from bloodstream infections as well as the associated genetic lineages of the isolates. Sixteen MRSA isolates were recovered from bacteremia samples from inpatients between 2016 and 2019. The antimicrobial susceptibility of these isolates was tested by the Kirby–Bauer disk diffusion method against 14 antimicrobial agents. To determine the macrolide–lincosamide–streptogramin B (MLSB) resistance phenotype of the isolates, erythromycin-resistant isolates were assessed by double-disk diffusion (D-test). The resistance and virulence genes were screened by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). All isolates were characterized by multilocus sequence typing (MLST), spa typing, staphylococcal chromosomal cassette mec (SCCmec) typing, and accessory gene regulator (agr) typing. Isolates showed resistance to cefoxitin, penicillin, ciprofloxacin, erythromycin, fusidic acid, clindamycin, and aminoglycosides, confirmed by the presence of the blaZ, ermA, ermC, mphC, msrA/B, aac(6’)-Ie-aph(2’’)-Ia, and ant(4’)-Ia genes. Three isolates were Panton–Valentine-leukocidin-positive. Most strains (n = 12) presented an inducible MLSB phenotype. The isolates were ascribed to eight spa-types (t747, t002, t020, t1084, t008, t10682, t18526, and t1370) and four MLSTs (ST22, ST5, ST105, and ST8). Overall, most (n = 12) MRSA isolates had a multidrug-resistance profile with inducible MLSB phenotypes and belonged to epidemic MRSA clones. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Antimicrobial Resistance and Virulence Mechanisms)
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