Special Issue "Colistin Resistance: The Need for a One Health Approach"

A special issue of Antibiotics (ISSN 2079-6382). This special issue belongs to the section "Antibiotics Use and Antimicrobial Stewardship".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Fabrizio Bertelloni
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Veterinary Sciences, University of Pisa, 56122 Pisa, Italy
Interests: Salmonella; Leptospira; antimicrobial resistance; wildlife; veterinary infectious diseases
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Barbara Turchi
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Veterinary Sciences, University of Pisa, Italy
Interests: Staphylococcus spp.; E. coli; antimicrobial resistance; probiotics
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Antimicrobial resistance represents one of the main concerns worldwide. Some studies contemplate the possibility of a return to the so-called “pre-antibiotic era” in a few years. In the past few years, there have been different emergencies like, for example, those related to the methicillin resistance in Staphylococcus aureus or the production of extended spectrum beta-lactamase by Enterobacteriaceae. Recently, the discovery of a plasmid gene (mcr-1) responsible for transferable colistin resistance in E. coli, opened a new potential crisis. Colistin is an antibiotic belonging to the class of Polymyxins and it is largely used in veterinary medicine and considered a “last choice” antimicrobial in human therapy, to treat infections caused by multidrug-resistant bacteria. Since the first detection of mcr-1 in 2015, many other mcr variants were discovered in isolates from humans, animals, and foods, generally associated with high colistin MIC values. To better understand this emergent problem, an integrated approach involving human and veterinary medicine, as well as environmental aspects, is essential.

This Special Issue welcomes every kind of contributions focusing on colistin resistance. Basic studies exploring new variants or modes of action of mcr genes are considered. Investigations exploring this topic with phenotypic and molecular methods are encouraged. “Epidemiological” studies describing the circulation of bacteria showing colistin resistance among humans, animals, food, and environmental samples from different areas of the world are of great interest.

Dr. Fabrizio Bertelloni
Dr. Barbara Turchi
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Antibiotics is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Colistin resistance
  • mcr genes
  • humans
  • veterinary
  • food
  • environment
  • epidemiology

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Comprehensive Statistical Evaluation of Etest®, UMIC®, MicroScan and Disc Diffusion versus Standard Broth Microdilution: Workflow for an Accurate Detection of Colistin-Resistant and Mcr-Positive E. coli
Antibiotics 2020, 9(12), 861; https://doi.org/10.3390/antibiotics9120861 - 03 Dec 2020
Abstract
Four colistin susceptibility testing methods were compared with the standard broth microdilution (BMD) in a collection of 75 colistin-susceptible and 75 mcr-positive E. coli, including ST131 isolates. Taking BMD as reference, all methods showed similar categorical agreement rates (CA) of circa [...] Read more.
Four colistin susceptibility testing methods were compared with the standard broth microdilution (BMD) in a collection of 75 colistin-susceptible and 75 mcr-positive E. coli, including ST131 isolates. Taking BMD as reference, all methods showed similar categorical agreement rates (CA) of circa 90%, and a low number of very major errors (VME) (0% for the MicroScan system and Etest®, 0.7% for UMIC®), except for the disc diffusion assay (breakpoint ≤ 11 mm), which yielded false-susceptible results for 8% of isolates. Of note is the number of mcr-positive isolates (17.3%) categorized as susceptible (≤2 mg/L) by the BMD method, but as resistant by the MicroScan system. ST131 mcr-positive E. coli were identified as colistin-resistant by all MIC-based methods. Our results show that applying the current clinical cut-off (>2 mg/L), many mcr-positive E. coli remain undetected, while applying a threshold of >1 mg/L the sensitivity of detection increases significantly without loss of specificity. We propose two possible workflows, both starting with the MicroScan system, since it is automated and, importantly, it categorized all mcr-positive isolates as colistin-resistant. MicroScan should be followed by either BMD or MIC-based commercial methods for colistin resistance detection; or, alternatively, MicroScan, followed by PCR for the mcr screening. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Colistin Resistance: The Need for a One Health Approach)
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