Special Issue "Antimicrobial Materials and Surface"

A special issue of Antibiotics (ISSN 2079-6382). This special issue belongs to the section "Antimicrobial Materials and Surfaces".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 November 2021).

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Marc Maresca
E-Mail Website1 Website2 Website3
Guest Editor
CNRS, Aix-Marseille University, Centrale Marseille, iSm2, 13013 Marseille, France
Interests: natural antimicrobial molecule; chemically synthetized and/or modified antimicrobial molecule; antimicrobial peptide; cationic polymers; antimicrobial material
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dr. Catherine Lefay
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Aix Marseille Université, Institut de Chimie Radicalaire (ICR), UMR 7273, 13397 Marseille, France
Interests: synthesis and characterization of antimicrobial copolymers and organic materials
Dr. Vincent Humblot
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Institut FEMTO-ST, Université Bourgogne Franche-Comté, UMR CNRS 6174, 25000 Besançon, France
Interests: self-assembled monolayers; surface modification; grafted anti-microbial peptides; bacterial biofilms; antibacterial surfaces; peptides modifications; peptides chirality

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Antimicrobial materials and surfaces are able to kill microorganisms such as bacteria, fungi, yeasts, and viruses, limiting the spread of hospital-associated infections, which account for more than 100,000 deaths per year worldwide. Apart from the health applications, antimicrobial activity is also present in numerous objects surrounding us such as food packaging, plastics, and textiles. To acquire antimicrobial activity, materials and surfaces have to be functionalized in a variety of different processes such as (i) their coating with antibiotics, metals, or metallic nanoparticles such as copper, silver, or antimicrobial peptides (AMPs); (ii) the incorporation into the materials of cationic polymers; or (iii) the use of photocatalytic molecules conferring self-cleaning activity to surfaces and materials.

In this Special Issue entitled “Antimicrobial Materials and Surfaces”, we invite authors to submit articles covering all aspects of this theme, including new materials, new molecules, new technology, new activities, as well as a deeper characterization of already-known antimicrobial materials and surfaces.

Dr. Marc Maresca
Dr. Catherine Lefay
Dr. Vincent Humblot
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Antibiotics is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Antimicrobial surface
  • antimicrobial material
  • functionalized surface
  • functionalized material
  • antibiotic resistance
  • antimicrobial peptides (AMPs)
  • cationic polymers

Published Papers (6 papers)

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Research

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Article
Quantitative Evaluation of Nucleic Acid Degradability of Copper Alloy Surfaces and Its Correlation to Antibacterial Activity
Antibiotics 2021, 10(12), 1439; https://doi.org/10.3390/antibiotics10121439 - 24 Nov 2021
Viewed by 202
Abstract
Copper (Cu) and its alloys have bactericidal activity known as “contact killing” with degradation of nucleic acids inside the bacteria, which is beneficial to inhibit horizontal gene transfer (HGF). In order to understand the nucleic acid degradability of Cu and its alloy surfaces, [...] Read more.
Copper (Cu) and its alloys have bactericidal activity known as “contact killing” with degradation of nucleic acids inside the bacteria, which is beneficial to inhibit horizontal gene transfer (HGF). In order to understand the nucleic acid degradability of Cu and its alloy surfaces, we developed a new in vitro method to quantitatively evaluate it by a swab method under a “dry” condition and compared it with that of commercially available antibacterial materials such as antibacterial stainless steel, pure silver, and antibacterial resins. As a result, only Cu and its alloys showed continuous degradation of nucleic acids for up to 6 h of contact time. The nucleic acid degradability levels of the Cu alloys and other antibacterial materials correlate to their antibacterial activities evaluated by a film method referring to JIS Z 2801:2012 for Gram-negative (Escherichia coli) and Gram-positive (Staphylococcus aureus) bacteria. Nucleic acid degradation by copper (I) and (II) chlorides was confirmed at the ranges over 10 mM and 1–20 mM, respectively, suggesting that the copper ion release may be responsible for the degradation of the nucleic acids on Cu and its alloy surfaces. In conclusion, the higher Cu content in the alloys gave higher nucleic acid degradability and higher antibacterial activities. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Antimicrobial Materials and Surface)
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Article
Mechanistic Study of the Kinetic Phenomena Influencing the Bacteriostatic Action of Silver Ions in Agar Bioassays
Antibiotics 2021, 10(4), 368; https://doi.org/10.3390/antibiotics10040368 - 31 Mar 2021
Viewed by 394
Abstract
Bacteriostatic action of a biocidal agent results from the cumulative impact of different kinetics, including those of bacterial growth, mass transfer of the agent and its antibacterial action against the targeted bacteria. Current studies on bacteriostatic effects always directly consider the combination of [...] Read more.
Bacteriostatic action of a biocidal agent results from the cumulative impact of different kinetics, including those of bacterial growth, mass transfer of the agent and its antibacterial action against the targeted bacteria. Current studies on bacteriostatic effects always directly consider the combination of these kinetics at given times, without discrimination between each other. This work introduces a novel approach, consisting of first studying independently, by the experiment and the model, the different kinetics involved, and then in coupling these kinetics to obtain a model that will be confronted with experimental data. An agar diffusion test with silver ions against Escherichia coli bacteria was implemented herein to assess the relevance of this approach. This work achieved to characterize the different kinetics and to propose a dynamic model combining them, which fits the experimental data with a silver diffusivity in the biofilm fixed to 7.0 ± 0.1 × 10−12 m2 s−1. This study also proves that the diffusive phenomenon was limiting the bacteriostatic action of silver ions over the test duration. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Antimicrobial Materials and Surface)
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Article
Vapor Phosphorylation of Cellulose by Phosphorus Trichlo-Ride: Selective Phosphorylation of 6-Hydroxyl Function—The Synthesis of New Antimicrobial Cellulose 6-Phosphate(III)-Copper Complexes
Antibiotics 2021, 10(2), 203; https://doi.org/10.3390/antibiotics10020203 - 19 Feb 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 790
Abstract
This research is focused on a synthesis of copper-cellulose phosphates antimicrobial complexes. Vapor-phase phosphorylations of cellulose were achieved by exposing microcrystalline cellulose to phosphorus trichloride (PCl3) vapors. The cellulose-O-dichlorophosphines (Cell-O-PCl2) formed were hydrolyzed to cellulose- [...] Read more.
This research is focused on a synthesis of copper-cellulose phosphates antimicrobial complexes. Vapor-phase phosphorylations of cellulose were achieved by exposing microcrystalline cellulose to phosphorus trichloride (PCl3) vapors. The cellulose-O-dichlorophosphines (Cell-O-PCl2) formed were hydrolyzed to cellulose-O-hydrogenphosphate (P(III)) (Cell-O-P(O)(H)(OH)), which, in turn, were converted into corresponding copper(II) complexes (Cell-O-P(O)(H)(OH)∙Cu2+). The analysis of the complexes Cell-O-P(O)(H)(OH)∙Cu2+ covered: scanning electron microscopy (SEM), attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR), atomic absorption spectrometry with flame excitation (FAAS), and bioactivity tests against representative Gram-negative bacteria (Escherichia coli) and Gram-positive bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus). The antimicrobial tests of synthesized Cell-O-P(O)(H)(OH)∙Cu2+ revealed their potential applications as an antibacterial material. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Antimicrobial Materials and Surface)
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Article
Validation of a Worst-Case Scenario Method Adapted to the Healthcare Environment for Testing the Antibacterial Effect of Brass Surfaces and Implementation on Hospital Antibiotic-Resistant Strains
Antibiotics 2020, 9(5), 245; https://doi.org/10.3390/antibiotics9050245 - 12 May 2020
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1339
Abstract
The evaluation of antibacterial activity of metal surfaces can be carried out using various published guidelines which do not always agree with each other on technical conditions and result interpretation. Moreover, these technical conditions are sometimes remote from real-life ones, especially those found [...] Read more.
The evaluation of antibacterial activity of metal surfaces can be carried out using various published guidelines which do not always agree with each other on technical conditions and result interpretation. Moreover, these technical conditions are sometimes remote from real-life ones, especially those found in health-care facilities, and do not include a variety of antibiotic-resistant strains. A worst-case scenario protocol adapted from published guidelines was validated on two reference strains (Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 6538 and Enterobacter aerogenes ATCC 13048). This protocol was designed to be as close as possible to a healthcare facility environment, including a much shorter exposure-time than the one recommended in guidelines, and evaluated the impact of parameters such as the method used to prepare inocula, seed on the surface, and recover bacteria following exposure. It was applied to a panel of 12 antibiotic-resistant strains (methicillin resistant, vancomycin-resistant, beta-lactamase, and carbapenemase producing strains as well as efflux pump-overexpressing ones) chosen as representative of the main bacteria causing hospital acquired infections. Within a 5-min exposure time, the tested brass surface displayed an antibacterial effect meeting a reduction cut-off of 99% compared to stainless steel, whatever the resistance mechanism harbored by the bacteria. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Antimicrobial Materials and Surface)

Review

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Review
How Do We Determine the Efficacy of an Antibacterial Surface? A Review of Standardised Antibacterial Material Testing Methods
Antibiotics 2021, 10(9), 1069; https://doi.org/10.3390/antibiotics10091069 - 03 Sep 2021
Viewed by 683
Abstract
Materials that confer antimicrobial activity, be that by innate property, leaching of biocides or design features (e.g., non-adhesive materials) continue to gain popularity to combat the increasing and varied threats from microorganisms, e.g., replacing inert surfaces in hospitals with copper. To understand how [...] Read more.
Materials that confer antimicrobial activity, be that by innate property, leaching of biocides or design features (e.g., non-adhesive materials) continue to gain popularity to combat the increasing and varied threats from microorganisms, e.g., replacing inert surfaces in hospitals with copper. To understand how efficacious these materials are at controlling microorganisms, data is usually collected via a standardised test method. However, standardised test methods vary, and often the characteristics and methodological choices can make it difficult to infer that any perceived antimicrobial activity demonstrated in the laboratory can be confidently assumed to an end-use setting. This review provides a critical analysis of standardised methodology used in academia and industry, and demonstrates how many key methodological choices (e.g., temperature, humidity/moisture, airflow, surface topography) may impact efficacy assessment, highlighting the need to carefully consider intended antimicrobial end-use of any product. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Antimicrobial Materials and Surface)
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Review
A Review on Revolutionary Natural Biopolymer-Based Aerogels for Antibacterial Delivery
Antibiotics 2020, 9(10), 648; https://doi.org/10.3390/antibiotics9100648 - 28 Sep 2020
Cited by 19 | Viewed by 2102
Abstract
A biopolymer-based aerogel has been developed to become one of the most potentially utilized materials in different biomedical applications. The biopolymer-based aerogel has unique physical, chemical, and mechanical properties and these properties are used in tissue engineering, biosensing, diagnostic, medical implant and drug [...] Read more.
A biopolymer-based aerogel has been developed to become one of the most potentially utilized materials in different biomedical applications. The biopolymer-based aerogel has unique physical, chemical, and mechanical properties and these properties are used in tissue engineering, biosensing, diagnostic, medical implant and drug delivery applications. Biocompatible and non-toxic biopolymers such as chitosan, cellulose and alginates have been used to deliver antibiotics, plants extract, essential oils and metallic nanoparticles. Antibacterial aerogels have been used in superficial and chronic wound healing as dressing sheets. This review critically analyses the utilization of biopolymer-based aerogels in antibacterial delivery. The analysis shows the relationship between their properties and their applications in the wound healing process. Furthermore, highlights of the potentials, challenges and proposition of the application of biopolymer-based aerogels is explored. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Antimicrobial Materials and Surface)
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