Molecular Detection, Pathogenesis, Antimicrobial Resistance and Mechanisms of Mycoplasma Isolates

A special issue of Antibiotics (ISSN 2079-6382). This special issue belongs to the section "Mechanism and Evolution of Antibiotic Resistance".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2024 | Viewed by 3328

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Department of Medicine, School of Medicine, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, New Orleans, LA 70112, USA
Interests: adolescent health; epidemiology; infectious diseases; public health; sexually transmitted diseases; sexually transmitted infections; statistical methods; women's health
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Over 100 bacterial species have been included in the genus Mycoplasma, living as parasites or commensals in humans, animals, and plants. Various Mycoplasma species cause joint changes in cows, fowl, goats, rats, and sheep, and respiratory tract alterations in cats and dogs. In humans, many cases of community-acquired pneumonia are due to Mycoplasma pneumoniae, and in the genital tract, Mycoplasma genitalium is associated with a morbidity that resembles that caused by Chlamydia trachomatis, including an increased risk of HIV acquisition. Mycoplasma hominis has been associated with bacterial vaginosis, endometritis, and pelvic inflammatory disease.

DNA amplification techniques are improving detection, advancing our understanding, and enabling the identification and differentiation of several Mycoplasma species of veterinary and human significance. Molecular interactions of Mycoplasmas with their host’s immune system and molecular mechanisms of antibiotic resistance against Mycoplasmas can thus be better understood.

This Special Issue on the molecular detection, pathogenesis, antimicrobial resistance and mechanisms of mycoplasma isolates in the journal Antibiotics invites the submission of original research manuscripts on the molecular detection of Mycoplasmas, the mechanisms by which they cause disease in humans or animals, the molecular mechanisms by which they evade their host’s immune system, and mutations that lead to the development of antimicrobial resistance.

Dr. M. Jacques Nsuami
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Antibiotics is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • antibiotic resistance
  • antimicrobial resistance
  • cell biology
  • molecular biology
  • molecular epidemiology
  • Mycoplasma
  • mutation
  • nucleic acid amplification test
  • pathogenesis
  • polymerase chain reaction

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

13 pages, 1071 KiB  
Article
Post-COVID-19 Pandemic Rebound of Macrolide-Resistant Mycoplasma pneumoniae Infection: A Descriptive Study
by Fan-Fan Xing, Kelvin Hei-Yeung Chiu, Chao-Wen Deng, Hai-Yan Ye, Lin-Lin Sun, Yong-Xian Su, Hui-Jun Cai, Simon Kam-Fai Lo, Lei Rong, Jian-Liang Chen, Vincent Chi-Chung Cheng, David Christopher Lung, Siddharth Sridhar, Jasper Fuk-Woo Chan, Ivan Fan-Ngai Hung and Kwok-Yung Yuen
Antibiotics 2024, 13(3), 262; https://doi.org/10.3390/antibiotics13030262 - 15 Mar 2024
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Abstract
The rebound characteristics of respiratory infections after lifting pandemic control measures were uncertain. From January to November 2023, patients presenting at a teaching hospital were tested for common respiratory viruses and Mycoplasma pneumoniae using a combination of antigen, nucleic acid amplification, and targeted [...] Read more.
The rebound characteristics of respiratory infections after lifting pandemic control measures were uncertain. From January to November 2023, patients presenting at a teaching hospital were tested for common respiratory viruses and Mycoplasma pneumoniae using a combination of antigen, nucleic acid amplification, and targeted next-generation sequencing (tNGS) tests. The number and rate of positive tests per month, clinical and microbiological characteristics were analyzed. A rapid rebound of SARS-CoV-2 was followed by a slower rebound of M. pneumoniae, with an interval of 5 months between their peaks. The hospitalization rate was higher, with infections caused by respiratory viruses compared to M. pneumoniae. Though the pediatric hospitalization rate of respiratory viruses (66.1%) was higher than that of M. pneumoniae (34.0%), the 4094 cases of M. pneumoniae within 6 months posed a huge burden on healthcare services. Multivariate analysis revealed that M. pneumoniae-infected adults had more fatigue, comorbidities, and higher serum C-reactive protein, whereas children had a higher incidence of other respiratory pathogens detected by tNGS or pathogen-specific PCR, fever, and were more likely to be female. A total of 85% of M. pneumoniae-positive specimens had mutations detected at the 23rRNA gene, with 99.7% showing A2063G mutation. Days to defervescence were longer in those not treated by effective antibiotics and those requiring a change in antibiotic treatment. A delayed but significant rebound of M. pneumoniae was observed after the complete relaxation of pandemic control measures. No unusual, unexplained, or unresponsive cases of respiratory infections which warrant further investigation were identified. Full article
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14 pages, 639 KiB  
Article
Characteristics of the Mycoplasma pneumoniae Epidemic from 2019 to 2020 in Korea: Macrolide Resistance and Co-Infection Trends
by Soyoun Shin, Sunhoe Koo, Yong-Jin Yang and Ho-Jae Lim
Antibiotics 2023, 12(11), 1623; https://doi.org/10.3390/antibiotics12111623 - 13 Nov 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1894
Abstract
Mycoplasma pneumoniae, a major etiological agent of community-acquired pneumonia, exhibits distinct cyclic epidemic patterns recurring every three to five years. Several cases of co-infection with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 have been reported globally, resulting in unfavorable clinical manifestations. This study [...] Read more.
Mycoplasma pneumoniae, a major etiological agent of community-acquired pneumonia, exhibits distinct cyclic epidemic patterns recurring every three to five years. Several cases of co-infection with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 have been reported globally, resulting in unfavorable clinical manifestations. This study investigated the epidemiological features of the recent M. pneumoniae outbreak (May 2019–April 2020) using retrospective data from the last five years. Molecular test data for macrolide resistance and co-infection were obtained from the Seegene Medical Foundation. National medical expenditure and hospitalization rates were analyzed using data from The Health Insurance Review and Assessment Service of Korea. The macrolide resistance rate was 69.67%, peaking at 71.30% during the epidemic period, which was considerably higher than the 60.89% rate during non-epidemic periods. The co-infection rate with other respiratory pathogens was 88.49%; macrolide-resistant M. pneumoniae strains showed a 2.33% higher co-infection rate than the susceptible strains. The epidemic period had 15.43% higher hospitalization and 78.27% higher medical budget expenditure per patient than non-epidemic periods. The increased rates of macrolide resistance and co-infection observed in macrolide-resistant M. pneumoniae during the epidemic period highlight the importance of monitoring future outbreaks, especially considering macrolide resistance and the risk of co-infection with other pathogens. Full article
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