Special Issue "Interfaces between Ruminant Nutrition, Ruminant Physiology and Quality of Products"

A special issue of Animals (ISSN 2076-2615). This special issue belongs to the section "Animal Nutrition".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Einar Vargas-Bello Perez
Website SciProfiles
Guest Editor
Department of Veterinary and Animal Sciences, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Grønnegårdsvej 3, DK-1870 Frederiksberg C, Denmark
Interests: ruminant nutrition; physiology
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Prof. Heidi Leskinen
Website
Guest Editor
Natural Resources Institute Finland (Luke), Finland
Interests: ruminant lipid metabolism and milk quality

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Nutrition and physiology are important research fields that contribute to the quality of final products. Understanding the interphases between both disciplines can establish a crosstalk between animal and food sciences. Very often, both are seen as two different fields, but they can actually complement each other.

The overall approach for this special issue is “from farm to fork”, including ruminant performance, ruminant metabolism, ruminant physiology, sensory analysis, and feed and food analysis.

We invite reviews and original research papers that address the use of ruminant nutrition and physiology with focus to the quality of the final product, such as dairy, beef, and fiber (wool). Moreover, contributions that make a clear link between the nutrition and physiology of ruminants to the environmental and economic sustainability of food are welcome.

Dr. Einar Vargas-Bello Perez
Prof. Heidi Leskinen
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Animals is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • nutrition
  • physiology
  • dairy
  • meat
  • product quality

Published Papers (4 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Open AccessArticle
Effects of Calcium Soaps from Palm, Canola and Safflower Oils on Dry Matter Intake, Nutrient Digestibility, Milk Production, and Milk Composition in Dairy Goats
Animals 2020, 10(10), 1728; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani10101728 - 23 Sep 2020
Abstract
This study determined the effect of protected dietary oils on dry matter intake (DMI), digestibility and milk production in dairy goats. Nine Saanen goats were used in a 3 × 3 Latin square design with three periods of 25 days. A basal diet [...] Read more.
This study determined the effect of protected dietary oils on dry matter intake (DMI), digestibility and milk production in dairy goats. Nine Saanen goats were used in a 3 × 3 Latin square design with three periods of 25 days. A basal diet based on barley hay and corn silage was supplemented with 2.7% DM of calcium soaps of either palm (PO), canola (CO) or safflower (SO) oils. Data for dry matter intake, nutrient digestibility and milk production was analyzed using the general linear model (GLM) procedure of SAS. Gas production data was analyzed using the procedure of non-linear regression analysis (PROC NLIN) from SAS. Nutrient intakes were not affected by treatments. However, compared with CO, the digestibility of dry matter (653 vs. 552 and 588 g/kg), organic matter (663 vs. 559 and 606 g/kg) and neutral detergent fiber (616 vs. 460 and 510 g/kg) were lowered (p < 0.001) by SO and PO. Compared with CO, in vitro gas production increased (p < 0.001) in PO and SO (174 vs. 201 and 206 mL gas/g incubated DM). Compared with PO and CO, milk production increased (p < 0.001) with SO (0.88 and 0.95 vs. 1.10 kg/d, respectively). With regard to PO and SO, CO decreased fat (34 and 35 vs. 32 g/d) and protein (35 and 38 vs. 30 g/d) in milk. In conclusion, compared to the traditional use of calcium soaps manufactured from PO, protected SO resulted in increased milk yield without negative effects on digestibility and nutrient intake. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Prediction of Carcass Traits of Hair Sheep Lambs Using Body Measurements
Animals 2020, 10(8), 1276; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani10081276 - 27 Jul 2020
Abstract
The present study was designed to evaluate the relationship between the body measurements (BMs) and carcass characteristics of hair sheep lambs. Twenty hours before slaughter, the shrunk body weight (SBW) and BMs were recorded. The BMs involved were height at withers (HW), rib [...] Read more.
The present study was designed to evaluate the relationship between the body measurements (BMs) and carcass characteristics of hair sheep lambs. Twenty hours before slaughter, the shrunk body weight (SBW) and BMs were recorded. The BMs involved were height at withers (HW), rib depth (RD), body diagonal length (BDL), body length (BL), pelvic girdle length (PGL), rump depth (RuD), rump height (RH), pin-bone width (PBW), hook-bone width (HBW), abdomen width (AW), girth (GC), and abdomen circumference (AC). After slaughter, the carcasses were weighed and chilled for 24 h at 1 °C, and then were split by the dorsal midline. The left-half was dissected into total soft tissues (muscle + fat; TST) and bone (BON), which were weighed separately. The weights of viscera and organs (VIS), internal fat (IF), and offals (OFF—skin, head, feet, tail, and blood) were also recorded. The equations obtained for predicting SBW, HCW, and CCW had an r2 ranging from 0.89 to 0.99, and those for predicting the TST and BON had an r2 ranging from 0.74 to 0.91, demonstrating satisfactory accuracy. Our results indicated that use of BMs could accurately and precisely be used as a useful tool for predicting carcass characteristics of hair sheep lambs. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Productive Performance, Milk Composition and Milk Fatty Acids of Goats Supplemented with Sunflower and Linseed Whole Seeds in Grass Silage-Based Diets
Animals 2020, 10(7), 1143; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani10071143 - 06 Jul 2020
Abstract
The objective of this study was to determine productive performance, milk composition and milk fatty acids (FA) of goats supplemented with sunflower and linseed whole seeds in grass silage-based diets. Nine Alpine goats were grouped in a replicated 3 × 3 Latin square [...] Read more.
The objective of this study was to determine productive performance, milk composition and milk fatty acids (FA) of goats supplemented with sunflower and linseed whole seeds in grass silage-based diets. Nine Alpine goats were grouped in a replicated 3 × 3 Latin square design (n = 3), that included three 21-d periods. Treatments were based on grass silage offered ad libitum and a concentrate mixture supplemented with either 40 g/d of Megalac-R® (control), 80 g/d of sunflower seed (SF), or 80 g/d of linseed (LS). Dry matter intake (1292 ± 14.0 g/d) and digestibility (g/kg) of dry matter (640 ± 32.1), organic matter (668 ± 32.4), neutral detergent fiber (628 ± 41.4) and acid detergent fiber (567 ± 60.9) was not affected by treatments (p > 0.05). Treatment did not affect milk fat yield (39.9 ± 1.24 g/d), protein content (4.5 ± 0.03 %) and protein yield (34.7 ± 1.22 g/d). Compared to control, SF and LS, decreased C16:0 (28.2 vs. 23.1 and 22.4 g/100 g), and increased total C18:1 (24.1 vs. 27.6 and 28.4 g/100 g) respectively. Overall, SF and LS resulted an effective strategy for altering the FA composition of goat´s milk towards a healthier profile for humans without deleterious effects on animal performance. Full article
Open AccessArticle
Effect of Feeding Lactating Ewes with Moringa oleifera Leaf Extract on Milk Yield, Milk Composition and Preweaning Performance of Ewe/Lamb Pair
Animals 2020, 10(7), 1117; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani10071117 - 29 Jun 2020
Abstract
The objective this study was to evaluate the effect of different doses of Moringa oleifera leaf extract (MOE) on milk production and milk composition in ewes and on preweaning performance of their lambs. Twenty-four lactating ewes were housed individually with their lambs and [...] Read more.
The objective this study was to evaluate the effect of different doses of Moringa oleifera leaf extract (MOE) on milk production and milk composition in ewes and on preweaning performance of their lambs. Twenty-four lactating ewes were housed individually with their lambs and assigned to four groups in a completely randomized design. The treatments included a basal diet without MOE (MOE0) or a basal diet supplemented with either 20 mL MOE per ewe per day (MOE20), 40 mL MOE per ewe per day (MOE40) or 60 mL MOE per ewe per day (MOE60). Over 45 days, milk production was recorded weekly and individual milk samples were collected for chemical analysis. Milk yield, fat-corrected milk and daily yields were similar among the four treatments. The supply of MOE did not affect ewe weaning efficiency and average daily gain or litter weaning weight of the lambs. Overall, the results from this study showed that dietary supplementation of hydroalcoholic extracts of Moringa oleifera leaves at doses of 20, 40 or 60 mL/ewes/d in lactating ewes does not have negative effects on milk yield, milk composition or lamb performance. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop