Special Issue "Multi-Functional Cultivation of Crops"

A special issue of Agronomy (ISSN 2073-4395). This special issue belongs to the section "Farming Sustainability".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2021.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Kestutis Romaneckas
Website
Guest Editor
Institute of Agroecosystems and Soil Sciences, Vytautas Magnus University, Agriculture Academy, K. Donelaičio str. 58, 44248 Kaunas, Lithuania.
Interests: sustainable tillage and sowing systems; field crop management; crop production; quality and safety; inter-cropping; soil properties and GHG emissions; weed and pest management; organic and precision farming; bio-fuel processing from agricultural wastes

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Intensive agriculture based on large amounts of fertilizers and pesticides initiated the physical, chemical, and biological degradation of soil, decreases in the biodiversity of soil and agrocenosis biota, the spread of weeds and pests, and increased GHG emissions and environment pollution worldwide. The rate of the Green Revolution is slowing down, and people’s food and raw biomass supplies are deteriorating. One sustainable way to prevent these problems is to increase crop functionality by inter-cropping several species of crops. This type of cultivation increases the productivity of the total herbal biomass per unit area, while also protecting against the spread of weeds, diseases, and pests. Multi-functional inter-cropped agrocenoses stabilize and restore soil fertility. In addition, increasing the cultivation biodiversity can improve the nutritional and energy efficacy of the harvest or raw biomass production. This Special Issue will highlight the agro-technological methods to increase the multi-functionality of field crop cultivation. Research papers, communications, and review articles are all welcome. More attention will be paid to research on agro-technological design (sowing methods, seed rate and distribution, fertilization methods and rate, harvesting methods, etc.) of multi-functional cultivations, the selection of crop species, their combinations, allelopathy, and their concurrence with each other and weeds or pests. Attention will also be paid to studies addressing the impact of inter-cropping on soil properties, nutrient leaching or runoff, GHG emissions, and the development, quantity, and quality of main production and biomass. Research data on multi-functional biomass processing for energy purposes (e.g., solid bio-fuel) are also welcome.

Prof. Dr. Kestutis Romaneckas
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Agronomy is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • agronomy
  • field crops
  • biodiversity
  • inter-cropping
  • soil fertility and respiration
  • weed and pest management
  • yield and quality
  • bio-fuel processing

Published Papers (1 paper)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Open AccessArticle
The Impact of Intercropping on Soil Fertility and Sugar Beet Productivity
Agronomy 2020, 10(9), 1406; https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy10091406 - 16 Sep 2020
Abstract
There is a lack of research on the practice of intercropping sugar beet and the impact of such agrocenoses on soil and crop fertility, especially under organic farming conditions. For this reason, a three-year stationary field experiment was performed at Vytautas Magnus University, [...] Read more.
There is a lack of research on the practice of intercropping sugar beet and the impact of such agrocenoses on soil and crop fertility, especially under organic farming conditions. For this reason, a three-year stationary field experiment was performed at Vytautas Magnus University, Agriculture Academy, Lithuania. Sugar beet was grown continuously with intercropped Persian clover (Trifolium resupinatum L., MC), white mustard (Sinapis alba L., MM) and spring barley (Hordeum vulgare L., MB) as a living mulch. Inter-row loosening (CT) and mulching with ambient weeds (MW) were used as comparative treatments. The results showed that, under minimal fertilization, CT and intercropping increased the average content of nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium in the soil. However, the average content of magnesium was reduced in single cases (MW, MB), and the average content of sulphur was reduced in all cases. Intercropping significantly decreased the yields of sugar beet root-crop, but was mainly neutral in quality terms. The meteorological conditions during experimentation had a weak impact on root-crop quantity and quality. Generally, the practice of sugar beet intercropping requires more detailed research on how to minimize the competition between the sugar beet, living mulch and weeds, and how to balance the nutrition conditions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Multi-Functional Cultivation of Crops)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Caraway Crop Productivity in the Multi-Cropping System

Aušra Marcinkevičienė, Aušra Rudinskienė, Rimantas Velička, Robertas Kosteckas, Zita Kriaučiūnienė

Vytautas Magnus University, Institute of Agroecosystem and Soil Sciences, Studentu str. 11, Akademija, Kaunas distr., Lithuania

Abstact: Both economic and environmental issues in the world stimulate interest in multi-cropping systems. Field experiment was carried at Experimental Station of Vytautas Magnus University, Agriculture Academy in 2017-2019. The aim of the study was to determine and compare weed spread and crop productivity in the mono (spring barley, spring wheat, pea, caraway), binary (spring barley-caraway, spring wheat-caraway, pea-caraway) and trinary (spring barley-caraway-white clover, spring wheat-caraway-white clover, pea-caraway-white clover) cultivations.

According to the results of experiment, an application of multi-cropping system limited spread of weeds and increased caraway crop productivity.

 

Key words: Carum carvi L., multi-cropping system, productivity, weed.

 

Short-term impact of intercropping on soil and sugar beet fertility

Kęstutis Romaneckas, Aida Adamavičienė, Egidijus Šarauskis, Jovita Balandaitė

Vytautas Magnus University, K. Donelaičio str. 58, 44248 Kaunas, Lithuania; [email protected]

Abstact: There exists a lack of research on the practice of intercropped sugar beet, and the impact of such agrocenoses on the soil and crop fertility, especially in organic farming conditions. For this reason, a 3-year stationary field experiment was performed at Vytautas Magnus University, Agriculture Academy. Sugar beet was grown continuously with intercropped Persian clover (Trifolium resupinatum L.) (MC), white mustard (Sinapis alba L.) (MM) and spring barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) (MB) as living mulch. Inter-row loosening (CT) and mulching with grown weeds (MW) were used as comparative treatments.

The results of the investigations showed that under minimal fertilization CT and intercropping on average increased the content of nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium in the soil and reduced the content of magnesium in single cases (MW, MB), and the content of sulphur – in all the cases. Sugar beet root-crop yields had often decreased significantly, although this negative effect has been reduced year by year. Generally, the practice of cultivating sugar beet crop with intercropped white mustard (MM) suggests as available method for environmentally friendly farming systems.

 

Keywords: chemical composition, Beta vulgaris L., living mulch, Planosol, root-crop productivity.

 

Back to TopTop