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Pharmaceuticals, Volume 10, Issue 4 (December 2017)

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Cover Story (view full-size image) In recent years Glu-ureido based radiotracers targeting the prostate-specific membrane antigen [...] Read more.
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Open AccessArticle Convenient Preparation of 18F-Labeled Peptide Probes for Potential Claudin-4 PET Imaging
Pharmaceuticals 2017, 10(4), 99; https://doi.org/10.3390/ph10040099
Received: 8 November 2017 / Revised: 8 December 2017 / Accepted: 13 December 2017 / Published: 18 December 2017
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1105 | PDF Full-text (4158 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Since pancreatic cancer is often diagnosed in a late state of cancer development, diagnostic opportunities allowing early disease detection are highly sought after. As such, cancer expression of claudin proteins is markedly dysregulated, making it an attractive target for molecular imaging like positron
[...] Read more.
Since pancreatic cancer is often diagnosed in a late state of cancer development, diagnostic opportunities allowing early disease detection are highly sought after. As such, cancer expression of claudin proteins is markedly dysregulated, making it an attractive target for molecular imaging like positron emission tomography (PET). Claudins are a family of transmembrane proteins that have a pivotal role as members of the tight junctions. In particular, claudin-3 and claudin-4 are frequently overexpressed in pancreatic cancer. 18F-Labeled claudin selective peptides would provide access to a novel kind of imaging tools for pancreatic cancer. In this work we describe the synthesis of the first 18F-labeled probes potentially suitable for PET imaging of claudin-4 expression. These probes were prepared using oxime ligation of 5-[18F]fluoro-5-deoxyribose (5-[18F]FDR) to claudin selective peptides. As a proof-of-principle, one of them, 5-[18F]FDR-Clone 27, was isolated in >98% radiochemical purity and in 15% radiochemical yield (EOB) within 98 min, and with a molar activity of 4.0 GBq/μmol (for 30 MBq of tracer). Moreover, we present first biological data for the prepared 5-FDR-conjugates. These tracers could pave the way for an early diagnosis of pancreatic tumor, and thus improve the outcome of anticancer therapy. Full article
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Open AccessMeeting Report 25th Conference of GP2A
Pharmaceuticals 2017, 10(4), 97; https://doi.org/10.3390/ph10040097
Received: 6 December 2017 / Revised: 6 December 2017 / Accepted: 6 December 2017 / Published: 14 December 2017
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Abstract
The 25th Conference of GP2A was held on 31 August and 1 September 2017 in Liverpool, UK, with the aim of exchange of ideas and experience, particularly amongst young medicinal chemists. Topics included bioactive compounds from plants and lichens, and design and development
[...] Read more.
The 25th Conference of GP2A was held on 31 August and 1 September 2017 in Liverpool, UK, with the aim of exchange of ideas and experience, particularly amongst young medicinal chemists. Topics included bioactive compounds from plants and lichens, and design and development of drugs. Abstracts of invited lectures, proffered oral presentations, flash presentations and posters presented during the meeting are collected in this report. Full article
Open AccessArticle Unexpected Binding Mode of a Potent Indeno[1,2-b]indole-Type Inhibitor of Protein Kinase CK2 Revealed by Complex Structures with the Catalytic Subunit CK2α and Its Paralog CK2α′
Pharmaceuticals 2017, 10(4), 98; https://doi.org/10.3390/ph10040098
Received: 17 November 2017 / Revised: 8 December 2017 / Accepted: 11 December 2017 / Published: 13 December 2017
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Abstract
Protein kinase CK2, a member of the eukaryotic protein kinase superfamily, is associated with cancer and other human pathologies and thus an attractive drug target. The indeno[1,2-b]indole scaffold is a novel lead structure to develop ATP-competitive CK2 inhibitors. Some indeno[1,2-b
[...] Read more.
Protein kinase CK2, a member of the eukaryotic protein kinase superfamily, is associated with cancer and other human pathologies and thus an attractive drug target. The indeno[1,2-b]indole scaffold is a novel lead structure to develop ATP-competitive CK2 inhibitors. Some indeno[1,2-b]indole-based CK2 inhibitors additionally obstruct ABCG2, an ABC half transporter overexpressed in breast cancer and co-responsible for drug efflux and resistance. Comprehensive derivatization studies revealed substitutions of the indeno[1,2-b]indole framework that boost either the CK2 or the ABCG2 selectivity or even support the dual inhibition potential. The best indeno[1,2-b]indole-based CK2 inhibitor described yet (IC50 = 25 nM) is 5-isopropyl-4-(3-methylbut-2-enyl-oxy)-5,6,7,8-tetrahydroindeno[1,2-b]indole-9,10-dione (4p). Herein, we demonstrate the membrane permeability of 4p and describe co-crystal structures of 4p with CK2α and CK2α′, the paralogs of human CK2 catalytic subunit. As expected, 4p occupies the narrow, hydrophobic ATP site of CK2α/CK2α′, but surprisingly with a unique orientation: its hydrophobic substituents point towards the solvent while its two oxo groups are hydrogen-bonded to a hidden water molecule. An equivalent water molecule was found in many CK2α structures, but never as a critical mediator of ligand binding. This unexpected binding mode is independent of the interdomain hinge/helix αD region conformation and of the salt content in the crystallization medium. Full article
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Open AccessReview Biodegradable Scaffolds for Bone Regeneration Combined with Drug-Delivery Systems in Osteomyelitis Therapy
Pharmaceuticals 2017, 10(4), 96; https://doi.org/10.3390/ph10040096
Received: 1 October 2017 / Revised: 27 November 2017 / Accepted: 29 November 2017 / Published: 12 December 2017
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1412 | PDF Full-text (1308 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
A great deal of research is ongoing in the area of tissue engineering (TE) for bone regeneration. A possible improvement in restoring damaged tissues involves the loading of drugs such as proteins, genes, growth factors, antibiotics, and anti-inflammatory drugs into scaffolds for tissue
[...] Read more.
A great deal of research is ongoing in the area of tissue engineering (TE) for bone regeneration. A possible improvement in restoring damaged tissues involves the loading of drugs such as proteins, genes, growth factors, antibiotics, and anti-inflammatory drugs into scaffolds for tissue regeneration. This mini-review is focused on the combination of the local delivery of antibiotic agents with bone regenerative therapy for the treatment of a severe bone infection such as osteomyelitis. The review includes a brief explanation of scaffolds for bone regeneration including scaffolds characteristics and types, a focus on severe bone infections (especially osteomyelitis and its treatment), and a literature review of local antibiotic delivery by the combination of scaffolds and drug-delivery systems. Some examples related to published studies on gentamicin sulfate-loaded drug-delivery systems combined with scaffolds are discussed, and future perspectives are highlighted. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Tissue-Protective Agents: New Drugs and Technologies)
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Open AccessReview Microglia M2A Polarization as Potential Link between Food Allergy and Autism Spectrum Disorders
Pharmaceuticals 2017, 10(4), 95; https://doi.org/10.3390/ph10040095
Received: 13 November 2017 / Revised: 5 December 2017 / Accepted: 5 December 2017 / Published: 9 December 2017
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1729 | PDF Full-text (399 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Atopic diseases are frequently co-morbid with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Allergic responses are associated with an activation of mast cells, innate lymphoid cells, and Th2 cells. These cells produce type-2 cytokines (IL4 and IL13), which stimulate microglia and macrophages to adopt a phenotype
[...] Read more.
Atopic diseases are frequently co-morbid with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Allergic responses are associated with an activation of mast cells, innate lymphoid cells, and Th2 cells. These cells produce type-2 cytokines (IL4 and IL13), which stimulate microglia and macrophages to adopt a phenotype referred to as ‘alternative activation’ or ‘M2A’. M2A-polarized macrophages and microglia play a physiological role in tissue repair by secreting growth factors such as brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and insulin-like growth factor-1. In ASD there is evidence for increased type-2 cytokines, microglia activation, M2A polarization, and increased levels of growth factors. In neurons, these growth factors drive a signal transduction pathway that leads to activation of the enzyme mammalian Target of Rapamycin (mTOR), and thereby to the inhibition of autophagy. Activation of mTOR is an effect that is also common to several of the genetic forms of autism. In the central nervous system, redundant synapses are removed via an autophagic process. Activation of mTOR would diminish the pruning of redundant synapses, which in the context of ASD is likely to be undesired. Based on this line of reasoning, atopic diseases like food allergy, eczema or asthma would represent risk factors for autism spectrum disorders. Full article
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Open AccessMeeting Report 31ièmes Journées Franco-Belges de Pharmacochimie: Meeting Report
Pharmaceuticals 2017, 10(4), 94; https://doi.org/10.3390/ph10040094
Received: 25 November 2017 / Accepted: 27 November 2017 / Published: 4 December 2017
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Abstract
The “Journées Franco-Belges de Pharmacochimie” is a recognized two-day annual meeting on Medicinal Chemistry that is renowned for the advanced science presented, conviviality, and outstanding opportunities for senior and young scientists to exchange knowledge. Abstracts of plenary lectures, oral communications, and posters presented
[...] Read more.
The “Journées Franco-Belges de Pharmacochimie” is a recognized two-day annual meeting on Medicinal Chemistry that is renowned for the advanced science presented, conviviality, and outstanding opportunities for senior and young scientists to exchange knowledge. Abstracts of plenary lectures, oral communications, and posters presented during the meeting are collected in this report. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Choices of the Journal)
Open AccessArticle Early Gabapentin Treatment during the Latency Period Increases Convulsive Threshold, Reduces Microglial Activation and Macrophage Infiltration in the Lithium-Pilocarpine Model of Epilepsy
Pharmaceuticals 2017, 10(4), 93; https://doi.org/10.3390/ph10040093
Received: 31 October 2017 / Revised: 14 November 2017 / Accepted: 19 November 2017 / Published: 28 November 2017
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Abstract
The lithium-pilocarpine model of epilepsy reproduces several features of temporal lobe epilepsy in humans, including the chronological timeline of an initial latency period followed by the development of spontaneous seizures. Epilepsy therapies in humans are implemented, as a rule, after the onset of
[...] Read more.
The lithium-pilocarpine model of epilepsy reproduces several features of temporal lobe epilepsy in humans, including the chronological timeline of an initial latency period followed by the development of spontaneous seizures. Epilepsy therapies in humans are implemented, as a rule, after the onset of the spontaneous seizures. We here studied the potential effect on epileptogenesis of starting an early treatment during the latency period, in order to prevent the development of spontaneous seizures. Adult male Wistar rats were treated with 3 mEq/kg LiCl, and 20 h later 30 mg/kg pilocarpine. Once status epilepticus (SE) was achieved, it was allowed to last for 20 min, and then motor seizures were controlled with the administration of 20 mg/kg diazepam. At 1DPSE (DPSE, days post-status epilepticus), animals started to receive 400 mg/kg/day gabapentin or saline for 4 days. At 5DPSE, we observed that SE induced an early profuse microglial and astroglial reactivity, increased synaptogenic trombospondin-1 expression and reduced AQP4 expression in astroglial ending feet. Blood brain barrier (BBB) integrity seemed to be compromised, as infiltrating NG2+ macrophages and facilitated access to the CNS was observed by transplanting eGFP+ blood cells and bone marrow-derived progenitors in the SE animals. The early 4-day gabapentin treatment successfully reduced microglial cell reactivity and blood-borne cell infiltration, without significantly altering the mRNA of proinflammatory cytokines IL-1β and TNFα immediately after the treatment. After 21DSPE, another group of animals that developed SE and received 4 days of gabapentin treatment, were re-exposed to subconvulsive accumulative doses of pilocarpine (10 mg/kg/30 min) and were followed by recording the Racine scale reached. Early 4-day gabapentin treatment reduced the Racine scale reached by the animals, reduced animal mortality, and reduced the number of animals that achieved SE (34% vs. 72%). We conclude that early gabapentin treatment following SE, during the latency period, is able to reduce neuroinflammation and produces a persistent effect that limits seizures and increases convulsive threshold, probably by restricting microglial reactivity and spurious synaptogenesis. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Epilepsy and Neurodegeneration: Current Therapeutic Implications)
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Open AccessArticle A Triphenylphosphonium-Functionalized Mitochondriotropic Nanocarrier for Efficient Co-Delivery of Doxorubicin and Chloroquine and Enhanced Antineoplastic Activity
Pharmaceuticals 2017, 10(4), 91; https://doi.org/10.3390/ph10040091
Received: 24 October 2017 / Revised: 14 November 2017 / Accepted: 18 November 2017 / Published: 21 November 2017
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1557 | PDF Full-text (3537 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Drug delivery systems that target subcellular organelles and, in particular, mitochondria are considered to have great potential in treating disorders that are associated with mitochondrial dysfunction, including cancer or neurodegenerative diseases. To this end, a novel hyperbranched mitochondriotropic nanocarrier was developed for the
[...] Read more.
Drug delivery systems that target subcellular organelles and, in particular, mitochondria are considered to have great potential in treating disorders that are associated with mitochondrial dysfunction, including cancer or neurodegenerative diseases. To this end, a novel hyperbranched mitochondriotropic nanocarrier was developed for the efficient co-delivery of two different (both in chemical and pharmacological terms) bioactive compounds. The carrier is based on hyperbranched poly(ethyleneimine) functionalized with triphenylphosphonium groups that forms ~100 nm diameter nanoparticles in aqueous media and can encapsulate doxorubicin (DOX), a well-known anti-cancer drug, and chloroquine (CQ), a known chemosensitizer with arising potential in anticancer medication. The anticancer activity of this system against two aggressive DOX-resistant human prostate adenocarcinoma cell lines and in in vivo animal studies was assessed. The co-administration of encapsulated DOX and CQ leads to improved cell proliferation inhibition at extremely low DOX concentrations (0.25 μΜ). In vivo experiments against DU145 human prostate cancer cells grafted on immunodeficient mice resulted in tumor growth arrest during the three-week administration period and no pervasive side effects. The findings put forward the potential of such targeted low dose combination treatments as a therapeutic scheme with minimal adverse effects. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Old Pharmaceuticals with New Applications)
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Open AccessArticle Synthesis and In Vitro Cytotoxicity of the 4-(Halogenoanilino)-6-bromoquinazolines and Their 6-(4-Fluorophenyl) Substituted Derivatives as Potential Inhibitors of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Tyrosine Kinase
Pharmaceuticals 2017, 10(4), 87; https://doi.org/10.3390/ph10040087
Received: 21 September 2017 / Revised: 29 October 2017 / Accepted: 31 October 2017 / Published: 20 November 2017
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1044 | PDF Full-text (2517 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Series of the 2-unsubstituted and 2-(4-chlorophenyl)–substituted 4-anilino-6-bromoquinazolines and their 6-(4-fluorophenyl)–substituted derivatives were evaluated for in vitro cytotoxicity against MCF-7 and HeLa cells. The 2-unsubstituted 4-anilino-6-bromoquinazolines lacked activity, whereas most of their 2-(4-chlorophenyl) substituted derivatives were found to exhibit significant cytotoxicity and selectivity against
[...] Read more.
Series of the 2-unsubstituted and 2-(4-chlorophenyl)–substituted 4-anilino-6-bromoquinazolines and their 6-(4-fluorophenyl)–substituted derivatives were evaluated for in vitro cytotoxicity against MCF-7 and HeLa cells. The 2-unsubstituted 4-anilino-6-bromoquinazolines lacked activity, whereas most of their 2-(4-chlorophenyl) substituted derivatives were found to exhibit significant cytotoxicity and selectivity against HeLa cells. Replacement of bromine with 4-fluorophenyl group for the 2-unsubstituted 4-anilinoquinazolines resulted in superior activity against HeLa cells compared to Gefitinib. The presence of a 4-fluorophenyl group in the 2-(4-chlorophenyl) substituted derivatives led to increased cytotoxicity against HeLa cells, except for the 3-chloroanilino derivative. The most active compounds, namely, 3g, 3l, and 4l, were found to exhibit a moderate to significant inhibitory effect against epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase (EGFR-TK). The EGFR molecular docking model suggested that these compounds are nicely bound to the region of EGFR. Full article
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Open AccessArticle Propagation of Fibrillar Structural Forms in Proteins Stopped by Naturally Occurring Short Polypeptide Chain Fragments
Pharmaceuticals 2017, 10(4), 89; https://doi.org/10.3390/ph10040089
Received: 22 September 2017 / Revised: 2 November 2017 / Accepted: 13 November 2017 / Published: 16 November 2017
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1232 | PDF Full-text (8432 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Amyloids characterized by unbounded growth of fibrillar structures cause many pathological processes. Such unbounded propagation is due to the presence of a propagating hydrophobicity field around the fibril’s main axis, preventing its closure (unlike in globular proteins). Interestingly, similar fragments, commonly referred to
[...] Read more.
Amyloids characterized by unbounded growth of fibrillar structures cause many pathological processes. Such unbounded propagation is due to the presence of a propagating hydrophobicity field around the fibril’s main axis, preventing its closure (unlike in globular proteins). Interestingly, similar fragments, commonly referred to as solenoids, are present in many naturally occurring proteins, where their propagation is arrested by suitably located “stopper” fragments. In this work, we analyze the distribution of hydrophobicity in solenoids and in their corresponding “stoppers” from the point of view of the fuzzy oil drop model (called FOD in this paper). This model characterizes the unique linear propagation of local hydrophobicity in the solenoid fragment and allows us to pinpoint “stopper” sequences, where local hydrophobicity quite closely resembles conditions encountered in globular proteins. Consequently, such fragments perform their function by mediating entropically advantageous contact with the water environment. We discuss examples of amyloid-like structures in solenoids, with particular attention to “stop” segments present in properly folded proteins found in living organisms. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Chemoinformatics and Drug Design)
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Open AccessArticle Amorphous Solid Dispersion of Epigallocatechin Gallate for Enhanced Physical Stability and Controlled Release
Pharmaceuticals 2017, 10(4), 88; https://doi.org/10.3390/ph10040088
Received: 27 September 2017 / Revised: 30 October 2017 / Accepted: 7 November 2017 / Published: 9 November 2017
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1669 | PDF Full-text (5757 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) has been recognized as the most prominent green tea extract due to its healthy influences. The high instability and low bioavailability, however, strongly limit its utilization in food and drug industries. This work, for the first time, develops amorphous solid
[...] Read more.
Epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) has been recognized as the most prominent green tea extract due to its healthy influences. The high instability and low bioavailability, however, strongly limit its utilization in food and drug industries. This work, for the first time, develops amorphous solid dispersion of EGCG to enhance its bioavailability and physical stability. Four commonly used polymeric excipients are found to be compatible with EGCG in water-dioxane mixtures via a stepwise mixing method aided by vigorous mechanical interference. The dispersions are successfully generated by lyophilization. The physical stability of the dispersions is significantly improved compared to pure amorphous EGCG in stress condition (elevated temperature and relative humidity) and simulated gastrointestinal tract environment. From the drug release tests, one of the dispersions, EGCG-Soluplus® 50:50 (w/w) shows a dissolution profile that only 50% EGCG is released in the first 20 min, and the remains are slowly released in 24 h. This sustained release profile may open up new possibilities to increase EGCG bioavailability via extending its elimination time in plasma. Full article
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Open AccessReview Essential Oils and Antifungal Activity
Pharmaceuticals 2017, 10(4), 86; https://doi.org/10.3390/ph10040086
Received: 13 October 2017 / Revised: 27 October 2017 / Accepted: 30 October 2017 / Published: 2 November 2017
Cited by 9 | Viewed by 2215 | PDF Full-text (1258 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Since ancient times, folk medicine and agro-food science have benefitted from the use of plant derivatives, such as essential oils, to combat different diseases, as well as to preserve food. In Nature, essential oils play a fundamental role in protecting the plant from
[...] Read more.
Since ancient times, folk medicine and agro-food science have benefitted from the use of plant derivatives, such as essential oils, to combat different diseases, as well as to preserve food. In Nature, essential oils play a fundamental role in protecting the plant from biotic and abiotic attacks to which it may be subjected. Many researchers have analyzed in detail the modes of action of essential oils and most of their components. The purpose of this brief review is to describe the properties of essential oils, principally as antifungal agents, and their role in blocking cell communication mechanisms, fungal biofilm formation, and mycotoxin production. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Choices of the Journal)
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Open AccessArticle Neurochemical Changes and c-Fos Mapping in the Brain after Carisbamate Treatment of Rats Subjected to Lithium–Pilocarpine-Induced Status Epilepticus
Pharmaceuticals 2017, 10(4), 85; https://doi.org/10.3390/ph10040085
Received: 15 September 2017 / Revised: 20 October 2017 / Accepted: 27 October 2017 / Published: 1 November 2017
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Abstract
The administration of lithium–pilocarpine (LiPilo) in adult rats is a validated model reproducing the main clinical and neuropathological features of temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). Previous studies have shown that carisbamate (CRS) has the property of modifying epileptogenesis in this model. When treated with
[...] Read more.
The administration of lithium–pilocarpine (LiPilo) in adult rats is a validated model reproducing the main clinical and neuropathological features of temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). Previous studies have shown that carisbamate (CRS) has the property of modifying epileptogenesis in this model. When treated with CRS, about 50% of rats undergoing LiPilo status epilepticus (SE) develop non-convulsive seizures (NCS) instead of convulsive ones (commonly observed in TLE). The goal of this work was to determine some of the early changes that occur after CRS administration, as they could be involved in the insult- and epileptogenesis-modifying effects of CRS. Thus, we performed high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) to quantify levels of amino acids and monoamines, and c-Fos immunohistochemical labeling to map cerebral activation during seizures. Comparing rats treated one hour after SE onset with saline (CT), CRS, or diazepam (DZP), HPLC showed that 4 h after SE onset, dopamine (DA), norepinephrine (NE), and GABA levels were normal, whereas serotonin levels were increased. Using c-Fos labeling, we demonstrated increased activity in thalamic mediodorsal (MD) and laterodorsal (LD) nuclei in rats treated with CRS. In summary, at early times, CRS seems to modulate excitability by acting on some monoamine levels and increasing activity of MD and LD thalamic nuclei, suggesting a possible involvement of these nuclei in insult- and/or epileptogenesis-modifying effects of CRS. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Epilepsy and Neurodegeneration: Current Therapeutic Implications)
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Open AccessArticle Acorenone B: AChE and BChE Inhibitor as a Major Compound of the Essential Oil Distilled from the Ecuadorian Species Niphogeton dissecta (Benth.) J.F. Macbr
Pharmaceuticals 2017, 10(4), 84; https://doi.org/10.3390/ph10040084
Received: 19 September 2017 / Revised: 24 October 2017 / Accepted: 25 October 2017 / Published: 31 October 2017
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1153 | PDF Full-text (1011 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This study investigated the chemical composition, physical proprieties, biological activity, and enantiomeric analysis of the essential oil from the aerial parts of Niphogeton dissecta (culantrillo del cerro) from Ecuador, obtained by steam distillation. The qualitative and quantitative analysis of the essential oil was
[...] Read more.
This study investigated the chemical composition, physical proprieties, biological activity, and enantiomeric analysis of the essential oil from the aerial parts of Niphogeton dissecta (culantrillo del cerro) from Ecuador, obtained by steam distillation. The qualitative and quantitative analysis of the essential oil was realized by gas chromatographic and spectroscopic techniques (GC-MS and GC-FID). Acorenone B was identified by GC-MS and NMR experiments. The enantiomeric distribution of some constituents has been assessed by enantio-GC through the use of a chiral cyclodextrin-based capillary column. We identified 41 components that accounted for 96.46% of the total analyzed, the major components were acorenone B (41.01%) and (E)-β-ocimene (29.64%). The enantiomeric ratio of (+)/(−)-β-pinene was 86.9:13.1, while the one of (+)/(−)-sabinene was 80.9:19.1. The essential oil showed a weak inhibitory activity, expressed as Minimal Inhibitory Concentration (MIC), against Enterococcus faecalis (MIC 10 mg/mL) and Staphylococcus aureus (MIC 5 mg/mL). Furthermore, it inhibited butyrylcholinesterase with an IC50 value of 11.5 μg/mL. Pure acorenone B showed inhibitory activity against both acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase, with IC50 values of 40.8 μg/mL and 10.9 μg/mL, respectively. Full article
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Open AccessArticle Systemic Interleukin-4 Administration after Spinal Cord Injury Modulates Inflammation and Promotes Neuroprotection
Pharmaceuticals 2017, 10(4), 83; https://doi.org/10.3390/ph10040083
Received: 7 September 2017 / Revised: 17 October 2017 / Accepted: 22 October 2017 / Published: 24 October 2017
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1608 | PDF Full-text (5037 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) causes dramatic disability and dysfunction in the motor, sensory and autonomic systems. The severe inflammatory reaction that occurs after SCI is strongly associated with further tissue damage. As such, immunomodulatory strategies have been developed, aimed at reducing inflammation,
[...] Read more.
Traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) causes dramatic disability and dysfunction in the motor, sensory and autonomic systems. The severe inflammatory reaction that occurs after SCI is strongly associated with further tissue damage. As such, immunomodulatory strategies have been developed, aimed at reducing inflammation, but also at shaping the immune response in order to protect, repair and promote regeneration of spared neural tissue. One of those promising strategies is the intraspinal administration of the cytokine interleukin-4 (IL-4) that was shown to promote a phenotype on specific immune cells associated with neuroprotection and repair. In this work, we evaluated if a systemic delivery of IL-4 for a 7-days period was also capable of promoting neuroprotection after SCI by analyzing different neural cells populations and motor recovery. IL-4 treatment promoted an elevation of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 in the serum both at 24 h and 7 days after injury. Locally, treatment with IL-4 led to a reduction on cells expressing markers associated with inflammation, CD11b/c and iNOS. Importantly, IL-4 treatment increased the neuronal markers βIII-tubulin and NeuN, and the oligodendrocyte marker O4, suggesting a neuroprotective effect. Moreover, 100% of the animals treated with IL-4 were able to recover weight support against only 33% of saline treated animals. Overall, these results show that systemic administration of IL-4 positively impacts different aspects of spinal cord injury, creating a more favorable environment for recovery to take place. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Tissue-Protective Agents: New Drugs and Technologies)
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Open AccessArticle Electrographic Changes Accompanying Recurrent Seizures under Ketogenic Diet Treatment
Pharmaceuticals 2017, 10(4), 82; https://doi.org/10.3390/ph10040082
Received: 26 September 2017 / Revised: 17 October 2017 / Accepted: 19 October 2017 / Published: 20 October 2017
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Abstract
The ketogenic diet (KD) is increasingly used to treat epilepsy refractory to antiepileptic drugs and other neurological disorders. In animal models, the KD was found to increase the threshold to seizures induced by different convulsive stimulations. However, in models in which suprathreshold stimuli
[...] Read more.
The ketogenic diet (KD) is increasingly used to treat epilepsy refractory to antiepileptic drugs and other neurological disorders. In animal models, the KD was found to increase the threshold to seizures induced by different convulsive stimulations. However, in models in which suprathreshold stimuli were used, a paradoxical seizure worsening was consistently observed in KD-fed animals. To better define this phenomenon, we characterized the electrographic response to seizures induced in mice which were treated with the KD, and then corneally stimulated at 6-Hz in four different sessions. We also evaluated the electroencephalogram (EEG) in three patients in which the KD was associated with a paradoxical worsening of epileptic seizures. Although seizures were initially less severe, a remarkable prolongation of the electrographic response was observed in mice receiving the KD from the second session of 6-Hz corneal stimulation and onwards. The EEG was also markedly altered in the presence of progressive seizure aggravation observed in children treated with the KD, specifically one affected by Lennox–Gastaut syndrome and two by type I lissencephaly. These results suggest that when seizures are induced or recur because of resistance to therapeutic interventions, the KD may change the EEG by potentiating the electrographic epileptic activity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Epilepsy and Neurodegeneration: Current Therapeutic Implications)
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Open AccessArticle Molecular Docking and 3D-Pharmacophore Modeling to Study the Interactions of Chalcone Derivatives with Estrogen Receptor Alpha
Pharmaceuticals 2017, 10(4), 81; https://doi.org/10.3390/ph10040081
Received: 21 August 2017 / Revised: 9 October 2017 / Accepted: 15 October 2017 / Published: 16 October 2017
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Abstract
Tamoxifen is the most frequently used anti-estrogen adjuvant treatment for estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer. However, it is associated with an increased risk of several serious side–effects, such as uterine cancer, stroke, and pulmonary embolism. The 2′,4′-dihydroxy-6-methoxy-3,5-dimethylchalcone (ChalcEA) from plant leaves of Eugenia aquea
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Tamoxifen is the most frequently used anti-estrogen adjuvant treatment for estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer. However, it is associated with an increased risk of several serious side–effects, such as uterine cancer, stroke, and pulmonary embolism. The 2′,4′-dihydroxy-6-methoxy-3,5-dimethylchalcone (ChalcEA) from plant leaves of Eugenia aquea, has been found to inhibit the proliferation of MCF-7 human breast cancer cells in a dose-dependent manner, with an IC50 of 74.5 μg/mL (250 μM). The aim of this work was to study the molecular interactions of new ChalcEA derivatives formed with the Estrogen Receptor α (ERα) using computer aided drug design approaches. Molecular docking using Autodock 4.2 was employed to explore the modes of binding of ChalcEA derivatives with ERα. The 3D structure-based pharmacophore model was derived using LigandScout 4.1 Advanced to investigate the important chemical interactions of the ERα-tamoxifen complex structure. The binding energy and the tamoxifen-pharmacophore fit score of the best ChalcEA derivative (HNS10) were −12.33 kcal/mol and 67.07 kcal/mol, respectively. The HNS10 interacted with Leu346, Thr347, Leu349, Ala350, Glu353, Leu387, Met388, Leu391, Arg394, Met421, and Leu525. These results suggest that the new ChalcEA derivatives could serve as the lead compound for potent ERα inhibitor in the fight against breast cancer. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Chemoinformatics and Drug Design)
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Open AccessArticle PARP Inhibition by Flavonoids Induced Selective Cell Killing to BRCA2-Deficient Cells
Pharmaceuticals 2017, 10(4), 80; https://doi.org/10.3390/ph10040080
Received: 5 September 2017 / Revised: 26 September 2017 / Accepted: 6 October 2017 / Published: 12 October 2017
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Abstract
High consumption of dietary flavonoids might contribute to a reduction of cancer risks. Quercetin and its glycosides have PARP inhibitory effects and can induce selective cytotoxicity in BRCA2-deficient cells by synthetic lethality. We hypothesized that common flavonoids in diet naringenin, hesperetin and their
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High consumption of dietary flavonoids might contribute to a reduction of cancer risks. Quercetin and its glycosides have PARP inhibitory effects and can induce selective cytotoxicity in BRCA2-deficient cells by synthetic lethality. We hypothesized that common flavonoids in diet naringenin, hesperetin and their glycosides have a similar structure to quercetin, which might have comparable PARP inhibitory effects, and can induce selective cytotoxicity in BRCA2-deficient cells. We utilized Chinese hamster V79 wild type, V-C8 BRCA2-deficient and its gene-complemented cells. In vitro analysis revealed that both naringenin and hesperetin present a PARP inhibitory effect. This inhibitory effect is less specific than for quercetin. Hesperetin was more cytotoxic to V79 cells than quercetin and naringenin based on colony formation assay. Quercetin and naringenin killed V-C8 cells with lower concentrations, and presented selective cytotoxicity to BRCA2-deficient cells. However, the cytotoxicity of hesperetin was similar among all three cell lines. Glycosyl flavonoids, isoquercetin and rutin as well as naringin showed selective cytotoxicity to BRCA2-deficient cells; hesperidin did not. These results suggest that flavonoids with the PARP inhibitory effect can cause synthetic lethality to BRCA2-deficient cells when other pathways are not the primary cause of death. Full article
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Open AccessReview Orexin Receptor Multimerization versus Functional Interactions: Neuropharmacological Implications for Opioid and Cannabinoid Signalling and Pharmacogenetics
Pharmaceuticals 2017, 10(4), 79; https://doi.org/10.3390/ph10040079
Received: 28 August 2017 / Revised: 29 September 2017 / Accepted: 29 September 2017 / Published: 8 October 2017
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1996 | PDF Full-text (1660 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Orexins/hypocretins are neuropeptides formed by proteolytic cleavage of a precursor peptide, which are produced by neurons found in the lateral hypothalamus. The G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) for these ligands, the OX1 and OX2 orexin receptors, are more widely expressed throughout the
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Orexins/hypocretins are neuropeptides formed by proteolytic cleavage of a precursor peptide, which are produced by neurons found in the lateral hypothalamus. The G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) for these ligands, the OX1 and OX2 orexin receptors, are more widely expressed throughout the central nervous system. The orexin/hypocretin system has been implicated in many pathways, and its dysregulation is under investigation in a number of diseases. Disorders in which orexinergic mechanisms are being investigated include narcolepsy, idiopathic sleep disorders, cluster headache and migraine. Human narcolepsy has been associated with orexin deficiency; however, it has only rarely been attributed to mutations in the gene encoding the precursor peptide. While gene variations within the canine OX2 gene hcrtr2 have been directly linked with narcolepsy, the majority of human orexin receptor variants are weakly associated with diseases (the idiopathic sleep disorders, cluster headache and polydipsia-hyponatremia in schizophrenia) or are of potential pharmacogenetic significance. Evidence for functional and/or heterodimerization between wild-type variant orexin receptors and opioid and cannabinoid receptors is discussed in the context of its relevance to depression and epilepsy. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Epilepsy and Neurodegeneration: Current Therapeutic Implications)
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Open AccessReview Heparin Mimetics: Their Therapeutic Potential
Pharmaceuticals 2017, 10(4), 78; https://doi.org/10.3390/ph10040078
Received: 5 July 2017 / Revised: 21 September 2017 / Accepted: 22 September 2017 / Published: 2 October 2017
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Abstract
Heparin mimetics are synthetic and semi-synthetic compounds that are highly sulfated, structurally distinct analogues of glycosaminoglycans. These mimetics are often rationally designed to increase potency and binding selectivity towards specific proteins involved in disease manifestations. Some of the major therapeutic arenas towards which
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Heparin mimetics are synthetic and semi-synthetic compounds that are highly sulfated, structurally distinct analogues of glycosaminoglycans. These mimetics are often rationally designed to increase potency and binding selectivity towards specific proteins involved in disease manifestations. Some of the major therapeutic arenas towards which heparin mimetics are targeted include: coagulation and thrombosis, cancers, and inflammatory diseases. Although Fondaparinux, a rationally designed heparin mimetic, is now approved for prophylaxis and treatment of venous thromboembolism, the search for novel anticoagulant heparin mimetics with increased affinity and fewer side effects remains a subject of research. However, increasingly, research is focusing on the non-anticoagulant activities of these molecules. Heparin mimetics have potential as anti-cancer agents due to their ability to: (1) inhibit heparanase, an endoglycosidase which facilitates the spread of tumor cells; and (2) inhibit angiogenesis by binding to growth factors. The heparin mimetic, PI-88 is in clinical trials for post-surgical hepatocellular carcinoma and advanced melanoma. The anti-inflammatory properties of heparin mimetics have primarily been attributed to their ability to interact with: complement system proteins, selectins and chemokines; each of which function differently to facilitate inflammation. The efficacy of low/non-anticoagulant heparin mimetics in animal models of different inflammatory diseases has been demonstrated. These findings, plus clinical data that indicates heparin has anti-inflammatory activity, will raise the momentum for developing heparin mimetics as a new class of therapeutic agent for inflammatory diseases. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Glycosaminoglycans and Proteoglycans) Printed Edition available
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Open AccessArticle Procedures for the GMP-Compliant Production and Quality Control of [18F]PSMA-1007: A Next Generation Radiofluorinated Tracer for the Detection of Prostate Cancer
Pharmaceuticals 2017, 10(4), 77; https://doi.org/10.3390/ph10040077
Received: 15 August 2017 / Revised: 14 September 2017 / Accepted: 16 September 2017 / Published: 27 September 2017
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 3388 | PDF Full-text (3699 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Radiolabeled tracers targeting the prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) have become important radiopharmaceuticals for the PET-imaging of prostate cancer. In this connection, we recently developed the fluorine-18-labelled PSMA-ligand [18F]PSMA-1007 as the next generation radiofluorinated Glu-ureido PSMA inhibitor after [18F]DCFPyL and
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Radiolabeled tracers targeting the prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) have become important radiopharmaceuticals for the PET-imaging of prostate cancer. In this connection, we recently developed the fluorine-18-labelled PSMA-ligand [18F]PSMA-1007 as the next generation radiofluorinated Glu-ureido PSMA inhibitor after [18F]DCFPyL and [18F]DCFBC. Since radiosynthesis so far has been suffering from rather poor yields, novel procedures for the automated radiosyntheses of [18F]PSMA-1007 have been developed. We herein report on both the two-step and the novel one-step procedures, which have been performed on different commonly-used radiosynthesisers. Using the novel one-step procedure, the [18F]PSMA-1007 was produced in good radiochemical yields ranging from 25 to 80% and synthesis times of less than 55 min. Furthermore, upscaling to product activities up to 50 GBq per batch was successfully conducted. All batches passed quality control according to European Pharmacopoeia standards. Therefore, we were able to disclose a new, simple and, at the same time, high yielding production pathway for the next generation PSMA radioligand [18F]PSMA-1007. Actually, it turned out that the radiosynthesis is as easily realised as the well-known [18F]FDG synthesis and, thus, transferable to all currently-available radiosynthesisers. Using the new procedures, the clinical daily routine can be sustainably supported in-house even in larger hospitals by a single production batch. Full article
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