Topic Editors

Dr. Julietta Moustaka
Department of Food Science-Plant, Food and Sustainability, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark
Department of Botany, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, 54124 Thessaloniki, Greece

Plant Responses to Environmental Stress

Abstract submission deadline
30 April 2024
Manuscript submission deadline
30 June 2024
Viewed by
13291

Topic Information

Dear Colleagues,

Plant growth and development are constantly exposed to biotic and abiotic stresses, such as drought, salinity, extreme temperature, UV radiation, high light, nutrient deficiency, insects, pathogens, and weeds. These the main reasons behind reductions in crop yields and food production worldwide. As a result, for example due to drought stress, remarkable changes occur in plant growth, photosynthesis, enzymatic activities, nutrient uptake, and biomass production. The decreased photosynthetic efficiency that is linked to both stomatal and nonstomatal effects is the result of a disruption of either biochemical or/and photochemical activity and increased oxidative damage by surplus reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation, which can harm the chloroplast and particularly photosystem II (PSII). Several studies have revealed that the concurrent action of many stresses, e.g., drought stress, high temperature, and high light, constantly cause deeper effects than when acting separately. Thus, there is a need for studies focusing on multiple stressors that occur at once. At the same time, plants have developed several energetic approaches at the morphological, physiological, and biochemical levels, allowing them to avoid and/or tolerate biotic and abiotic stresses. Environmental-stress-induced ROS creation is scavenged by enzymatic and nonenzymatic antioxidants. Plant responses to a disruption of homeostasis caused by a low environmental stress level display an overcompensation reaction that results in a hormetic stimulation. Understanding the way plants respond to biotic and abiotic stresses is an ongoing research topic. This Research Topic will highlight the mechanisms of plant responses to such stresses and, thus, can help in the development of realistic interventions for increasing agricultural productivity. Hence, detecting steps or mechanisms where plant response mechanisms are suboptimal under different environmental conditions, and then optimizing these steps for a better response, represents a key research target in the efforts to increase the ability of crop plants to face climate change which can detrimentally influence crop production. To meet global food and feed requirements, considering the current climate change crisis, it is essential to recognize how plants respond and adapt their metabolism to environmental stresses.

Dr. Julietta Moustaka
Prof. Dr. Michael Moustakas
Topic Editors

Keywords

  • drought stress
  • salinity stress
  • herbivores
  • heavy metal stress
  • light stress
  • UV radiation
  • temperature stress
  • nutrient deficiency
  • pathogens
  • reactive oxygen species

Participating Journals

Journal Name Impact Factor CiteScore Launched Year First Decision (median) APC
Agriculture
agriculture
3.6 3.6 2011 17.7 Days CHF 2600 Submit
Agronomy
agronomy
3.7 5.2 2011 15.8 Days CHF 2600 Submit
Plants
plants
4.5 5.4 2012 15.3 Days CHF 2700 Submit
Stresses
stresses
- - 2021 17.1 Days CHF 1000 Submit

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Published Papers (11 papers)

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18 pages, 1338 KiB  
Article
Phosphorus Dynamics in Stressed Soil Systems: Is There a Chemical and Biological Compensating Effect?
by Bruna Arruda, Fábio Prataviera, Wilfrand Ferney Bejarano Herrera, Denise de Lourdes Colombo Mescolotti, Antonio Marcos Miranda Silva, Hudson Wallace Pereira de Carvalho, Paulo Sergio Pavinato and Fernando Dini Andreote
Stresses 2024, 4(2), 251-268; https://doi.org/10.3390/stresses4020015 - 02 Apr 2024
Viewed by 534
Abstract
Here, we hypothesized the occurrence of a compensatory relationship between the application of P and different microbial communities in the soil, specifically in relation to the chemical and biological effects in the soil–plant–microorganisms’ interaction. We aimed to evaluate the plant–microbiota responses in plants [...] Read more.
Here, we hypothesized the occurrence of a compensatory relationship between the application of P and different microbial communities in the soil, specifically in relation to the chemical and biological effects in the soil–plant–microorganisms’ interaction. We aimed to evaluate the plant–microbiota responses in plants grown in soils hosting distinct microbial communities and rates of P availability. Two experiments were carried out in a greenhouse. The first experiment evaluated four manipulated soil microbiome compositions, four P rates, and two plant species. Manipulated soil systems were obtained by the following: (i) autoclaving soil for 1 h at 121 °C (AS); (ii) inoculating AS with soil suspension dilution (AS + 10−3); (iii) heating natural soil at 80 °C for 1 h (NH80); or (iv) using natural soil (NS) without manipulation. The P rates added were 0, 20, 40, and 60 mg kg−1, and the two plant species tested were grass (brachiaria) and leguminous (crotalaria). Inorganic labile P (PAER), microbial P (PMIC), acid phosphatase activity (APASE), and shoot P uptake (PUPT) were assessed for each system. Brachiaria presented a compensatory effect for PUPT, whereby the addition of P under conditions of low microbial community enhanced P absorption capacity from the soil. However, in a system characterized by low P input, the increase in the soil biodiversity was insufficient to enhance brachiaria PUPT. Likewise, crotalaria showed a higher PUPT under high P application and low microbial community. The second experiment used three manipulated microbiome compositions: AS + 10−3; NH80; and NS and three P rates added: 0, 20, and 40 mg kg−1. In addition, two treatments were set: without and with mycorrhiza inoculation. Brachiaria showed an increase in the PUPT under low microbial communities (AS + 10−3; NH80) with P addition (20 and 40 mg kg−1 of P), but no mycorrhization was observed. In the undisturbed microbial community (NS), under no P input (0 mg kg−1 of P), brachiaria showed low mycorrhization and low PUPT. Finally, NS and the recommended P input (40 mg kg−1 of P) represented a balance between chemical and biological fertility, promoting the equilibrium between mycorrhization and PUPT. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Plant Responses to Environmental Stress)
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17 pages, 5145 KiB  
Article
Photosystem II Tolerance to Excess Zinc Exposure and High Light Stress in Salvia sclarea L.
by Michael Moustakas, Anelia Dobrikova, Ilektra Sperdouli, Anetta Hanć, Julietta Moustaka, Ioannis-Dimosthenis S. Adamakis and Emilia Apostolova
Agronomy 2024, 14(3), 589; https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy14030589 - 15 Mar 2024
Viewed by 527
Abstract
High light (HL) intensity has a substantial impact on light energy flow and partitioning within photosynthetic apparatus. To realize the impact of HL intensity on zinc (Zn) tolerance mechanisms in clary sage (Salvia sclarea L., Lamiaceae) plants, we examined the effect of [...] Read more.
High light (HL) intensity has a substantial impact on light energy flow and partitioning within photosynthetic apparatus. To realize the impact of HL intensity on zinc (Zn) tolerance mechanisms in clary sage (Salvia sclarea L., Lamiaceae) plants, we examined the effect of the altered chlorophyll and nutrient uptake under excess Zn supply on the response mechanism of photosystem II (PSII) photochemistry. Eight-week-old clary sage plants were treated with 5 μM Zn (control) or 900 μM Zn in Hoagland nutrient solution. Leaf elemental analysis for Zn, Mn, Mg, and Fe was performed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), whereas PSII functioning under HL was evaluated by chlorophyll fluorescence imaging analysis. Exposure of S. sclarea plants to 900 μM Zn increased leaf Zn accumulation and decreased leaf Mg and chlorophyll. The decreased non-photochemical quenching (NPQ) provided evidence of the photoprotection offered by the smaller light-harvesting antennae due to the reduced chlorophyll. The increased Mn after Zn exposure corresponded with higher efficiency of the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) that was significantly correlated with the maximum efficiency of photosystem II (PSII) photochemistry (Fv/Fm). An increased electron transport rate (ETR) coincided with increased leaf Fe, which is known to play a vital role in the enzymes engaged in ETR. The decreased (32%) NPQ after an 8-day exposure to Zn caused an increased (10%) quantum yield of non-regulated energy loss in PSII (ΦNO), indicative of an increased singlet oxygen (1O2) production. It is suggested that the decreased NPQ induced acclimation responses of clary sage plants to HL and excess Zn by increasing 1O2 production. The reduced (18%) excess excitation energy (EXC) at PSII and the increased (24%) quantum yield of PSII photochemistry (ΦPSII) and ETR indicated improved photosynthetic efficiency under excess Zn and HL intensity. Therefore, the exposure of medicinal plants to excess Zn not only boosts their photosynthetic efficiency, enhancing crop yields, but can also improve Fe and Zn content, ameliorating the human health deficiency of these two essential micronutrients. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Plant Responses to Environmental Stress)
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20 pages, 5592 KiB  
Article
Transcriptome Profiling Reveals Molecular Responses to Salt Stress in Common Vetch (Vicia sativa L.)
by Yanmei Sun, Na Zhao, Hongjian Sun, Shan Xu, Yiwen Lu, Haojie Xi, Zhenfei Guo and Haifan Shi
Plants 2024, 13(5), 714; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants13050714 - 03 Mar 2024
Viewed by 709
Abstract
Common vetch (Vicia sativa L.) is an important annual diploid leguminous forage. In the present study, transcriptomic profiling in common vetch in response to salt stress was conducted using a salt-tolerant line (460) and a salt-sensitive line (429). The common responses in [...] Read more.
Common vetch (Vicia sativa L.) is an important annual diploid leguminous forage. In the present study, transcriptomic profiling in common vetch in response to salt stress was conducted using a salt-tolerant line (460) and a salt-sensitive line (429). The common responses in common vetch and the specific responses associated with salt tolerance in 460 were analyzed. Several KEGG (Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes) pathways, including plant hormone and MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase) signaling, galactose metabolism, and phenylpropanoid phenylpropane biosynthesis, were enriched in both lines, though some differentially expressed genes (DEGs) showed distinct expression patterns. The roots in 460 showed higher levels of lignin than in 429. α-linolenic acid metabolism, carotenoid biosynthesis, the photosynthesis-antenna pathway, and starch and sucrose metabolism pathways were specifically enriched in salt-tolerant line 460, with higher levels of accumulated soluble sugars in the leaves. In addition, higher transcript levels of genes involved in ion homeostasis and reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging were observed in 460 than in 429 in response to salt stress. The transcriptomic analysis in common vetch in response to salt stress provides useful clues for further investigations on salt tolerance mechanism in the future. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Plant Responses to Environmental Stress)
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13 pages, 1865 KiB  
Article
Isolation and Phenotypic Microarray Profiling of Different Pseudomonas Strains Isolated from the Rhizosphere of Curcuma longa L.
by Parul Pathak, Monika Singh, Ananya Naskar, Sandeep Kumar Singh, Nikunj Bhardwaj and Ajay Kumar
Stresses 2023, 3(4), 749-761; https://doi.org/10.3390/stresses3040051 - 13 Nov 2023
Viewed by 951
Abstract
In the present study, different Pseudomonas strains were isolated from the rhizospheric soil of Curcuma longa (turmeric) and further identified and characterized based on morphological, biochemical, and molecular characteristics through the 16S rRNA gene sequencing analysis. The identified bacterial strains belong to the [...] Read more.
In the present study, different Pseudomonas strains were isolated from the rhizospheric soil of Curcuma longa (turmeric) and further identified and characterized based on morphological, biochemical, and molecular characteristics through the 16S rRNA gene sequencing analysis. The identified bacterial strains belong to the Pseudomonas genus viz. Pseudomonas sp. CL10, Pseudomonas sp. CL11, and P. fluorescence CLI4. However, the isolated strains tested positive for IAA production, siderophore production, and the solubilization of tricalcium phosphate during plant growth promoting traits analysis. Further phenotype microArray (PM) technology was used to evaluate the antibiotic and chemical sensitivity of the isolated bacterial strains. The antibiotics phleomycin, oxacillin, vancomycin, novobiocin, spiramycin, and rifampicin, as well as chemicals like, 5-7 dichloro-8-hydroxy quanaldine, 5-7 dichloro-8-hydroxyquinoline, domophenbrobide, and 3-5 dimethoxy benzyl alcohol, showed resistance in all the rhizobacterial strains. However, upon further detailed study, Pseudomonas sp. CL10 exhibited resistance to thirteen antibiotics, CL11 to fourteen, and CL14 showed resistance against seventeen antibiotics and chemical classes. The results of the study indicate that some of these strains can be used as bioinoculum to enhance the plant growth and health. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Plant Responses to Environmental Stress)
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15 pages, 3826 KiB  
Review
Response Mechanisms of Woody Plants to High-Temperature Stress
by Chao Zhou, Shengjiang Wu, Chaochan Li, Wenxuan Quan and Anping Wang
Plants 2023, 12(20), 3643; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants12203643 - 22 Oct 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1960
Abstract
High-temperature stress is the main environmental stress that restricts the growth and development of woody plants, and the growth and development of woody plants are affected by high-temperature stress. The influence of high temperature on woody plants varies with the degree and duration [...] Read more.
High-temperature stress is the main environmental stress that restricts the growth and development of woody plants, and the growth and development of woody plants are affected by high-temperature stress. The influence of high temperature on woody plants varies with the degree and duration of the high temperature and the species of woody plants. Woody plants have the mechanism of adapting to high temperature, and the mechanism for activating tolerance in woody plants mainly counteracts the biochemical and physiological changes induced by stress by regulating osmotic adjustment substances, antioxidant enzyme activities and transcription control factors. Under high-temperature stress, woody plants ability to perceive high-temperature stimuli and initiate the appropriate physiological, biochemical and genomic changes is the key to determining the survival of woody plants. The gene expression induced by high-temperature stress also greatly improves tolerance. Changes in the morphological structure, physiology, biochemistry and genomics of woody plants are usually used as indicators of high-temperature tolerance. In this paper, the effects of high-temperature stress on seed germination, plant morphology and anatomical structure characteristics, physiological and biochemical indicators, genomics and other aspects of woody plants are reviewed, which provides a reference for the study of the heat-tolerance mechanism of woody plants. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Plant Responses to Environmental Stress)
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14 pages, 16024 KiB  
Article
Influence of Surface Methane on Tropospheric Ozone Concentrations and Cereal Yield in Asia
by Kenichi Tatsumi
Agronomy 2023, 13(10), 2586; https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy13102586 - 09 Oct 2023
Viewed by 951
Abstract
Methane (CH4) emanating from terrestrial sources serves as a precursor for the genesis of tropospheric ozone (O3), a pernicious atmospheric contaminant that adversely modulates the physiological mechanisms of agricultural crops. Despite the acknowledged role of CH4 in amplifying [...] Read more.
Methane (CH4) emanating from terrestrial sources serves as a precursor for the genesis of tropospheric ozone (O3), a pernicious atmospheric contaminant that adversely modulates the physiological mechanisms of agricultural crops. Despite the acknowledged role of CH4 in amplifying O3 concentrations, the extant literature offers limited quantitative evaluations concerning the repercussions of CH4-mediated O3 on cereal yields. Employing the GEOS-Chem atmospheric chemistry model, the present investigation elucidates the ramifications of a 50% diminution in anthropogenic CH4 concentrations on the yield losses of maize, soybean, and wheat across Asia for the fiscal year 2010. The findings unveil pronounced yield detriments attributable to O3-induced phytotoxicity, with the Indo-Gangetic Plain and the North China Plain manifesting the most substantial yield impairments among the crops examined. A halving of anthropogenic CH4 effluents could ameliorate considerable losses in cereal production across these agriculturally pivotal regions. CH4-facilitated O3 exerts a pernicious influence on cereal yields; nevertheless, targeted mitigation of CH4 effluents, particularly in the vicinity of the North China Plain, holds the potential to substantially attenuate O3 contamination, thereby catalyzing an enhancement in regional cereal production. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Plant Responses to Environmental Stress)
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17 pages, 5337 KiB  
Article
Pipe Cavitation Parameters Reveal Bubble Embolism Dynamics in Maize Xylem Vessels across Water Potential Gradients
by Yangjie Ren, Yitong Zhang, Shiyang Guo, Ben Wang, Siqi Wang and Wei Gao
Agriculture 2023, 13(10), 1867; https://doi.org/10.3390/agriculture13101867 - 24 Sep 2023
Viewed by 1055
Abstract
Maize, a crop of international relevance, frequently undergoes xylem embolism due to water shortage, negatively impacting growth, yield, and quality. Consequently, a refined comprehension of xylem embolism is vital for enhancing maize cultivation. Notwithstanding extensive research and the generation of analytical models for [...] Read more.
Maize, a crop of international relevance, frequently undergoes xylem embolism due to water shortage, negatively impacting growth, yield, and quality. Consequently, a refined comprehension of xylem embolism is vital for enhancing maize cultivation. Notwithstanding extensive research and the generation of analytical models for embolism mechanisms, prevalent models often disregard crop-specific hydraulic processes and the formation of embolisms via air bubbles in the xylem conduit. In this research, we present an inventive model applying pipe cavitation parameters to discern water potential and bubble formation in maize leaf xylem. The model integrates pivotal physiological traits of the maize–leaf count, leaf vein count, and diameter of xylem vessels—demonstrating robust correlations. Furthermore, we constructed Percent Loss of Conductivity (PLC) curve based on water potential and compared it with our model, offering interval data to observe embolization events triggered by air bubbles. Utilizing experimental data, our novel cavitation-parameter-based model effectively corresponds with observed bubble phenomena and appropriately characterizes water transport in plant xylem conduits. This method enabled us to observe the transition from bubble occurrence to cavitation embolism microscopically, which aligned with the embolism intervals provided by the model. This procedure reveals potential trends in bubble-induced embolism and deepens our knowledge of microscopic plant hydraulics and crop embolism. This work establishes a basis for understanding the generation of bubble embolisms in maize, assists in evaluating maize-plant water status for efficient water supply management throughout the growth cycle, and contributes towards potential water management strategies for maize. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Plant Responses to Environmental Stress)
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13 pages, 908 KiB  
Review
An Overview of the Impacts of Climate Change on Vineyard Ecosystems in Niagara, Canada
by Diana Ribeiro Tosato, Heather VanVolkenburg and Liette Vasseur
Agriculture 2023, 13(9), 1809; https://doi.org/10.3390/agriculture13091809 - 14 Sep 2023
Viewed by 1620
Abstract
Vineyards are agroecosystems of great importance in the Niagara Region, Ontario (Canada). Due to its microclimate, this region is projected to be impacted by climate change with temperature increases, changes in precipitation patterns in all seasons, and greater frequency of extreme weather events. [...] Read more.
Vineyards are agroecosystems of great importance in the Niagara Region, Ontario (Canada). Due to its microclimate, this region is projected to be impacted by climate change with temperature increases, changes in precipitation patterns in all seasons, and greater frequency of extreme weather events. The aim of this review paper is to summarize which seasonal changes are expected to occur in the Niagara Region and assess how such changes are likely to affect the main components of the vineyard ecosystem (i.e., soil, vines, invertebrates, and pathogens). It is expected that by 2080 the region will experience an increase in temperature in all four seasons; an increase in precipitation during the fall, winter, and spring; and a decrease in precipitation during summer months. Impacts of the projected changes will likely lead to vine water stress, yield loss, increases in incidents of diseases, increases in the spread of new pests, and changes in grape quality ultimately resulting in lower wine quality and/or production. Current management practices will need to be better understood and adaptive strategies introduced to enhance grape growers’ ability to minimize these impacts. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Plant Responses to Environmental Stress)
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18 pages, 3158 KiB  
Article
Porous Minerals Improve Wheat Shoot Growth and Grain Yield through Affecting Soil Properties and Microbial Community in Coastal Saline Land
by Lan Ma, Yanjing Song, Jie Wang, Yan Shan, Tingting Mao, Xiaoyan Liang, Haiyang Zhang, Rao Fu, Junlin Li, Wenjing Nie, Meng Li, Jiajia Li, Kuihua Yi, Lu Wang, Xiangyu Wang and Hongxia Zhang
Agronomy 2023, 13(9), 2380; https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy13092380 - 13 Sep 2023
Viewed by 1065
Abstract
Soil salinization has become a major environmental factor severely threatening global food security. The application of porous minerals could significantly ameliorate soil fertility and promote plant productivity under salt stress conditions. However, the effects of porous minerals on improving the salt resistance of [...] Read more.
Soil salinization has become a major environmental factor severely threatening global food security. The application of porous minerals could significantly ameliorate soil fertility and promote plant productivity under salt stress conditions. However, the effects of porous minerals on improving the salt resistance of grain crops in coastal saline soils is not fully studied. In this work, the shoot growth and grain yield of wheat plants grown in coastal saline fields, respectively amended with the four naturally available porous minerals, diatomite, montmorillonite, bentonite and zeolite, were assessed. The application of porous minerals, especially zeolite, significantly improved the biomass and grain yield of wheat plants under saline conditions, as demonstrated by the augmented plant fresh mass (14.8~61.2%) and increased seed size (3.8~58.8%) and number (1.4~57.5%). Soil property analyses exhibited that porous-mineral amendment decreased soil sodium content and sodium absorption ratio, and increased soil nutrients in both the rhizosphere and nonrhizosphere of wheat plants. Further quantitative-PCR and 16S high-throughput sequencing analysis revealed that porous-mineral application also remarkably increased the abundance of bacterial 16S rRNA (0.8~102.4%) and fungal 18S rRNA (89.2~209.6%), and altered the composition of the soil microbial community in the rhizosphere of wheat. Our findings suggest that zeolite could be used as an ideal salt soil amendment, and the changes in soil properties and microorganisms caused by the application of porous minerals like zeolite improved the salt resistance of wheat plants in coastal saline land, leading to increased shoot growth and seed production. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Plant Responses to Environmental Stress)
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14 pages, 3263 KiB  
Article
Growth and Photosynthetic Responses to Increased LED Light Intensity in Korean Ginseng (Panax ginseng C.A. Meyer) Sprouts
by Jinnan Song, Jingli Yang and Byoung Ryong Jeong
Agronomy 2023, 13(9), 2375; https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy13092375 - 13 Sep 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1036
Abstract
Compared to the traditional production of ginseng roots, Panax ginseng sprouts (PGSs) are currently regarded as a substitute due to the relatively short-term culture but still high nutrition. However, the optimal light intensity for the growth ability of PGSs and the characterizations of [...] Read more.
Compared to the traditional production of ginseng roots, Panax ginseng sprouts (PGSs) are currently regarded as a substitute due to the relatively short-term culture but still high nutrition. However, the optimal light intensity for the growth ability of PGSs and the characterizations of the responses of PGSs to the light intensity have been largely neglected. This study aimed to determine the influences of the light intensity on the growth, morphogenesis, and photosynthetic responses in PGSs. To this end, two-year-old ginseng rootlets were subjected to one of six light intensities (from 30 to 280 PPFD with 50 PPFD intervals) in a plant factory with artificial lighting (PFAL) via LED light for 10 weeks. On the whole, the recorded parameters of the PGSs showed gradually decreasing trends in response to the increasing light intensities. However, the 80 PPFD-treated PGSs possessed similar or greater root dry weights, leaf areas, carotenoids levels, and photosynthesis (the maximal PSII quantum yield) compared to those in the 30 PPFD regime. Additionally, photoinhibition symptoms as evidenced by chlorosis, necrosis, and stunted growth were observed as the light intensity attained 180 PPFD. Thus, 130 PPFD could be considered a safe point for the appearance of photoinhibition in PGSs. Taken together, we show that the light intensity range of 30–80 PPFD is suitable for maximizing the production of PGSs in PFALs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Plant Responses to Environmental Stress)
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15 pages, 1956 KiB  
Article
De Novo Transcriptome Analysis of Solanum lycopersicum cv. Super Strain B under Drought Stress
by Hassan S. Al-Zahrani, Tarek A. A. Moussa, Hameed Alsamadany, Rehab M. Hafez and Michael P. Fuller
Agronomy 2023, 13(9), 2360; https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy13092360 - 11 Sep 2023
Viewed by 854
Abstract
Tomato cv. super strain B was widely cultivated in Saudi Arabia under drought stress. Illumina Hiseq-2000 was used to create the transcriptional profile of tomato cultivar super strain B. A total of 98,069 contigs were gathered, with an average length of 766 bp. [...] Read more.
Tomato cv. super strain B was widely cultivated in Saudi Arabia under drought stress. Illumina Hiseq-2000 was used to create the transcriptional profile of tomato cultivar super strain B. A total of 98,069 contigs were gathered, with an average length of 766 bp. Most of the genes in the gene ontology (GO) analysis were categorized into molecular function (MF) of ATP binding (1301 genes), metal ion binding (456 genes), protein kinase activity (392 genes), transferase activity (299 genes), Biological process (BP) of DNA-templated genes (366 genes), and regulation of transcription genes (209 genes), while cellular components (CC) of integral component of membrane (436 genes). The most dominant enzymes expressed were transferases (645 sequences). According to the KEGG pathway database, 15,638 transcripts were interpreted in 125 exclusive pathways. The major pathway groups were metabolic pathways (map01100, 315 genes) and biosynthesis of secondary metabolites (map01110, 188 genes). The total number of variants in the twelve chromosomes of super strain B compared with the tomato genome was 5284. The total number of potential SSRs was 5047 in 4806 unigenes. Trinucleotide repeats (3006, 59.5%) were the most found type in the transcriptome. A total of 4541 SNPs and 744 INDELs in tomato super strain B were identified when compared with the tomato genome. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Plant Responses to Environmental Stress)
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