Special Issue "Reproductive and Developmental Toxicology"

A special issue of Toxics (ISSN 2305-6304). This special issue belongs to the section "Toxicology and Public Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 September 2017)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Louise C. Abbott

Department of Veterinary Integrative Biosciences (VIBS), College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 77843-4458, USA
Website | E-Mail
Phone: +1-979-845-2828
Fax: +1-979-847-8981

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The fields of reproductive and developmental toxicology are complex areas of considerable importance and intense study, not just for the human population, but also for all animal species. Reproductive systems and developing embryos and fetuses exhibit increased risks of adverse effects due to exposure to a broad range of toxicants, from pharmaceuticals to environmental contaminants. New information concerning risk levels, as well as ways to mitigate risk, are gained using in vitro, in silico, and in vivo toxicity models and epidemiological studies. Research about effects of toxicants on the process of reproduction and on developing individuals requires investigation at all levels of scientific inquiry: molecular, physiological and anatomical; and the importance of genetic makeup in response to toxicant exposure is just being realized. Individuals may encounter substances that have potentially harmful effects on reproductive health or the developing embryo and fetus anywhere in the environment, through water, air, soil, dust, food, or consumer products. The ultimate goal of all toxicology research is to utilize reliable and predictive toxicity testing to understand and prevent exposure to potentially harmful toxicants of reproducing animals and humans as well as developing individuals. This Special Issue focuses on reproductive and developmental toxicology. We invite authors to submit manuscripts that assess the environmental health and safety of any toxicant with adverse effects on male and female reproductive systems or the developing embryo or fetus.

Prof. Dr. Louise C. Abbott
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Toxics is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 350 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • reproductive toxicity
  • reproductive toxicology
  • developmental toxicology
  • embryo toxicity
  • fetal toxicity
  • environmental exposures

Published Papers (2 papers)

View options order results:
result details:
Displaying articles 1-2
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

Open AccessFeature PaperArticle Embryonic Ethanol Exposure Affects Early- and Late-Added Cardiac Precursors and Produces Long-Lasting Heart Chamber Defects in Zebrafish
Received: 27 October 2017 / Revised: 20 November 2017 / Accepted: 22 November 2017 / Published: 1 December 2017
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (5548 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Drinking mothers expose their fetuses to ethanol, which produces birth defects: craniofacial defects, cognitive impairment, sensorimotor disabilities and organ deformities, collectively termed as fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD). Various congenital heart defects (CHDs) are present in FASD patients, but the mechanisms of alcohol-induced
[...] Read more.
Drinking mothers expose their fetuses to ethanol, which produces birth defects: craniofacial defects, cognitive impairment, sensorimotor disabilities and organ deformities, collectively termed as fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD). Various congenital heart defects (CHDs) are present in FASD patients, but the mechanisms of alcohol-induced cardiogenesis defects are not completely understood. This study utilized zebrafish embryos and older larvae to understand FASD-associated CHDs. Ethanol-induced cardiac chamber defects initiated during embryonic cardiogenesis persisted in later zebrafish life. In addition, myocardial damage was recognizable in the ventricle of the larvae that were exposed to ethanol during embryogenesis. Our studies of the pathogenesis revealed that ethanol exposure delayed differentiation of first and second heart fields and reduced the number of early- and late-added cardiomyocytes in the heart. Ethanol exposure also reduced the number of endocardial cells. Together, this study showed that ethanol-induced heart defects were present in late-stage zebrafish larvae. Reduced numbers of cardiomyocytes partly accounts for the ethanol-induced zebrafish heart defects. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Reproductive and Developmental Toxicology)
Figures

Figure 1

Review

Jump to: Research

Open AccessReview Occupational Exposure to Bisphenol A (BPA): A Reality That Still Needs to Be Unveiled
Received: 18 July 2017 / Revised: 25 August 2017 / Accepted: 11 September 2017 / Published: 13 September 2017
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (298 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Bisphenol A (BPA), 2,2-bis(4-hydroxyphenyl) propane, is one of the most utilized industrial chemicals worldwide, with the ability to interfere with/or mimic estrogenic hormones with associated biological responses. Environmental human exposure to this endocrine disruptor, mostly through oral intake, is considered a generalized phenomenon,
[...] Read more.
Bisphenol A (BPA), 2,2-bis(4-hydroxyphenyl) propane, is one of the most utilized industrial chemicals worldwide, with the ability to interfere with/or mimic estrogenic hormones with associated biological responses. Environmental human exposure to this endocrine disruptor, mostly through oral intake, is considered a generalized phenomenon, particularly in developed countries. However, in the context of occupational exposure, non-dietary exposure sources (e.g., air and contact) cannot be underestimated. Here, we performed a review of the literature on BPA occupational exposure and associated health effects. Relevantly, the authors only identified 19 studies from 2009 to 2017 that demonstrate that occupationally exposed individuals have significantly higher detected BPA levels than environmentally exposed populations and that the detection rate of serum BPA increases in relation to the time of exposure. However, only 12 studies performed in China have correlated potential health effects with detected BPA levels, and shown that BPA-exposed male workers are at greater risk of male sexual dysfunction across all domains of sexual function; also, endocrine disruption, alterations to epigenetic marks (DNA methylation) and epidemiological evidence have shown significant effects on the offspring of parents exposed to BPA during pregnancy. This overview raises awareness of the dramatic and consistent increase in the production and exposure of BPA and creates urgency to assess the actual exposure of workers to this xenoestrogen and to evaluate potential associated adverse health effects. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Reproductive and Developmental Toxicology)
Back to Top