Special Issue "Design of Adhesive Bonded Joints"

A special issue of Processes (ISSN 2227-9717). This special issue belongs to the section "Manufacturing Processes and Systems".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2023 | Viewed by 2956

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Raul D.S.G. Campilho
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Departamento de Engenharia Mecânica, Instituto Superior de Engenharia do Porto, 4200-072 Porto, Portugal
Interests: material joining; adhesive joints; material characterization; polymers; composite materials; advanced manufacturing systems; automation and robotics; industrial design; finite element method; cohesive zone models
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The adhesive bonding technology has shown significant improvements over the past few decades, which enabled its application in many industries, such as aerospace, aeronautical and automotive. Nonetheless, new experimental techniques, as well as numerical models, are continuously being proposed in the scientific literature and applied in the industry, thus showing the relevance of this topic. Experimentally, new adhesives, material combinations, and joint geometries are continuously being explored, leading to innovative designs and improved solutions. On the other hand, analytical and numerical strength prediction models aim to accurately predict the joint’s behavior and, as a result, reduce the costs and expedite design. Constant evolution of these models is currently taking place, triggered by the need to model complex materials and loadings, with emphasis to numerical models, including improved fracture modelling by techniques, such as fracture mechanics, cohesive zone models, and the adaptation of recent techniques (including meshless methods). Fatigue and impact loadings are particularly challenging and have recently seen major advances. This Special Issue intends to bring together a significant number of good contributions in this area through high-quality original works in the adhesive joints field, subsequently promoting its dissemination through the open access system.

Prof. Dr. Raul D.S.G. Campilho
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • adhesives
  • adhesive joints
  • adhesive joints characterization
  • structural adhesives
  • adhesive joint design
  • experimental testing of adhesives
  • analytical analysis of joint behavior
  • numerical analysis of joint behavior
  • strength prediction
  • failure path prediction
  • finite element method
  • fracture mechanics
  • cohesive zone models
  • cohesive laws
  • cohesive parameters
  • damage mechanics
  • extended finite element method
  • meshless methods
  • static load
  • impact load
  • fatigue load

Published Papers (6 papers)

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Research

Article
Determination of the Bonding Strength of Finger Joints Using a New Test Specimen Geometry
Processes 2023, 11(2), 445; https://doi.org/10.3390/pr11020445 - 02 Feb 2023
Viewed by 203
Abstract
In this study, a specimen geometry for testing finger joints was developed using finite element simulation and proofed by experimental testing. Six different wood species and three adhesives were used for finger-jointing specimens. With the test specimen geometry, the bonding strength of the [...] Read more.
In this study, a specimen geometry for testing finger joints was developed using finite element simulation and proofed by experimental testing. Six different wood species and three adhesives were used for finger-jointing specimens. With the test specimen geometry, the bonding strength of the finger joints was determined without the usual self-locking of the joint. Under load, the test specimen geometry introduces maximum stress at the beginning of the bond line (adhesive zone). However, the test specimen geometry does not generate a symmetric stress state. The main difficulty here is the flank angle of the finger joint geometry. The wood species and adhesives significantly influenced the performance of the finger joints. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Design of Adhesive Bonded Joints)
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Article
Adhesive Thickness and Ageing Effects on the Mechanical Behaviour of Similar and Dissimilar Single Lap Joints Used in the Automotive Industry
Processes 2023, 11(2), 433; https://doi.org/10.3390/pr11020433 - 01 Feb 2023
Viewed by 240
Abstract
The effects of the adhesive thickness and overlap of a polyurethane adhesive have been studied by using different substrate configurations. Single lap joint (SLJ) specimens have been tested with homologous substrates, carbon fibre-reinforced plastics and painted metal substrates. Furthermore, a configuration with dissimilar [...] Read more.
The effects of the adhesive thickness and overlap of a polyurethane adhesive have been studied by using different substrate configurations. Single lap joint (SLJ) specimens have been tested with homologous substrates, carbon fibre-reinforced plastics and painted metal substrates. Furthermore, a configuration with dissimilar substrates has been included in the experimental campaign. Both types of these adhesive and substrates are used in the automotive industry. The bonding procedure has been carried out without a surface treatment in order to quantify the shear strength and stiffness when surface treatments are not used on the substrates, reproducing typical mass production conditions. Three different ageing cycles have been used to evaluate the effects on SLJ specimens. A finite element model that uses cohesive modelling has been built and optimised to assess the differences between the different adopted SLJ configurations. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Design of Adhesive Bonded Joints)
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Article
The Effect of Organic Fillers on the Mechanical Strength of the Joint in the Adhesive Bonding
Processes 2023, 11(2), 406; https://doi.org/10.3390/pr11020406 - 30 Jan 2023
Viewed by 353
Abstract
The most important advantages of adding additives to adhesives are increasing the bonding strength and reducing the adhesive cost. The desire to reduce costs as well as the need for environmentally friendly and health-friendly products have paved the way for the recycling of [...] Read more.
The most important advantages of adding additives to adhesives are increasing the bonding strength and reducing the adhesive cost. The desire to reduce costs as well as the need for environmentally friendly and health-friendly products have paved the way for the recycling of waste materials and the use of cheaper natural materials as additives. In this study, mussel, olive pomace, and walnut powders in different ratios (5%, 15%, and 30% by weight) and in different sizes (38 and 45 µm) were added to an epoxy adhesive. The steel materials were joined in the form of single-lap joints by using the obtained adhesives with additives. These joints were subjected to the tensile test and the strengths of these joints were examined. SEM images of the bonding interface were taken, and the distribution of the powders was examined. When the powder size was 45 µm, bond strengths increased in all additive ratios compared to the pure adhesive, while for 38 µm powders, the strength value increased only at the 5% additive ratio. In joints with 45 µm powder additives, the strength increased by up to 38% compared to the pure adhesive, while this rate was determined as 31% for 38 µm. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Design of Adhesive Bonded Joints)
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Article
Reuse of Carbon Fibers and a Mechanically Recycled CFRP as Rod-like Fillers for New Composites: Optimization and Process Development
Processes 2023, 11(2), 366; https://doi.org/10.3390/pr11020366 - 24 Jan 2023
Viewed by 562
Abstract
The rising amount of carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) composite waste requires new processes for reintroducing waste into the production cycle. In the present research, the objective is the design and study of a reuse process for carbon fibers and CFRP by mechanical [...] Read more.
The rising amount of carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) composite waste requires new processes for reintroducing waste into the production cycle. In the present research, the objective is the design and study of a reuse process for carbon fibers and CFRP by mechanical recycling consisting of length and width reduction, obtaining rods and reintegrating them as fillers into a polymeric matrix. Preliminary studies are carried out with continuous and discontinuous unidirectional fibers of various lengths. The processing conditions are then optimized, including the length of the reinforcement, the need for a plasma surface treatment and/or for resin post-curing. The resin is thermally characterized by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), while the composites are mechanically characterized by tensile strength tests, completed by a factorial design. In addition, the composites tested are observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to study the fracture mechanics. Optimal processing conditions have been found to reduce the reinforcement length to 40 mm while maintaining the mechanical properties of continuous reinforcement. Furthermore, the post-curing of the epoxy resin used as matrix is required, but a low-pressure plasma treatment (LPPT) is not recommended on the reinforcement. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Design of Adhesive Bonded Joints)
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Article
Influence of Loading Rate on the Cohesive Traction for Soft, Rubber-Like Adhesive Layers Loaded in Modes I and III
Processes 2023, 11(2), 356; https://doi.org/10.3390/pr11020356 - 22 Jan 2023
Viewed by 260
Abstract
To date, the fracture behaviour of soft, polyurethane-based adhesive joints has rarely been investigated. This work contributes to the experimental investigation of such joints in modes I and III by performing double cantilever beam (mode I) and out-of-plane loaded double cantilever beam (mode [...] Read more.
To date, the fracture behaviour of soft, polyurethane-based adhesive joints has rarely been investigated. This work contributes to the experimental investigation of such joints in modes I and III by performing double cantilever beam (mode I) and out-of-plane loaded double cantilever beam (mode III) tests at various loading rates. The tests were evaluated using a J-integral method, which is well established for testing stiff adhesive layers and is conventionally used to determine the cohesive traction at the crack tip. Additionally, fibre-optics measurements were conducted to provide crack extension, process zone length, and cohesive traction from the measured backface strain of the adherends. It was found that the energy release rate seems to be largely independent of the loading mode. However, differences were observed regarding process zone length and resistance curve behaviour. Furthermore, the backface strain measurement allows the determination of the cohesive traction along with the complete adhesive layer as well as separation and separation rate, yielding rate-dependent cohesive laws. A comparison indicated that the cohesive traction obtained from the J-integral method does not match the measured benchmark from the backface strain measurements because the underlying theoretical assumptions of the J-integral method are likely violated for soft, rubber-like adhesive joints. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Design of Adhesive Bonded Joints)
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Article
Numerical Modelling and Validation of Mixed-Mode Fracture Tests to Adhesive Joints Using J-Integral Concepts
Processes 2022, 10(12), 2730; https://doi.org/10.3390/pr10122730 - 17 Dec 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 422
Abstract
The interest in the design and numerical modelling of adhesively-bonded components and structures for industrial application is increasing as a research topic. Although research on joint failure under pure mode is widespread, applied bonded joints are often subjected to a mixed mode loading [...] Read more.
The interest in the design and numerical modelling of adhesively-bonded components and structures for industrial application is increasing as a research topic. Although research on joint failure under pure mode is widespread, applied bonded joints are often subjected to a mixed mode loading at the crack tip, which is more complex than the pure mode and affects joint strength. Failure of these joints under loading is the objective of predictions through mathematical and numerical models, the latter based on the Finite Element Method (FEM), using Cohesive Zone Modelling (CZM). The Single leg bending (bending) testing is among those employed to study mixed mode loading. This work aims to validate the application of FEM-CZM to SLB joints. Thus, the geometries used for experimental testing were reproduced numerically and experimentally obtained properties were employed in these models. Upon the validation of the numerical technique, a parametric study involving the cohesive laws’ parameters is performed, identifying the parameters with the most influence on the joint behaviour. As a result, it was possible to numerically model SLB tests of adhesive joints and estimate the mixed-mode behaviour of different adhesives, which enables mixed-mode modelling and design of adhesive structures. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Design of Adhesive Bonded Joints)
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