Special Issue "Bio-Based Additive Manufacturing in Food and Tissue Engineering"

A special issue of Polymers (ISSN 2073-4360). This special issue belongs to the section "Biomacromolecules, Biobased and Biodegradable Polymers".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 20 January 2022.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Sara Oliveira
E-Mail Website1 Website2
Guest Editor
International Iberian Nanotechnology Laboratory, Food Processing and Nutrition Group, Av. Mestre Veiga s/n, 4715-330 Braga, Portugal
Interests: 3D Printing; 3D Food printing; Bioprinting; Food Texture; Functional Foods; Rheology; Biotribology; Biomaterials; 3D Scaffolds; Stem Cells; Bone; Growth factors; Cell-materials interactions; Cell-based meat
Dr. Pablo Fuciños
E-Mail Website
Co-Guest Editor
Food Processing Research Group, International Iberian Nanotechnology Laboratory, Av. Mestre José Veiga s/n, 4715-330 Braga, Portugal
Interests: 3D food printing; active and smart food packaging; microbial enzymes; bioactives; functional foods; microalgae; food nanostructures; cell-based meat; enzyme technology; protein purification
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Lorenzo M. Pastrana
E-Mail Website
Co-Guest Editor
Food Processing Research Group, International Iberian Nanotechnology Laboratory, Av. Mestre José Veiga s/n, 4715-330 Braga, Portugal
Interests: functional foods; bioactives; active and smart food packaging; oleogels; by-products valorization; food nanostructures; food texture; probiotics; gut-on-chip microfluidics; cell-based meat
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

3D printing inspires many through its vast potential for full customization of 3D structures made of almost any kind of material. In particular, bio-based additive manufacturing employs naturally derived materials (e.g., proteins, polymers, bioactive compounds, and cells) to level-up medical devices (in tissue engineering) or the nutrition and organoleptic properties of foods (in food engineering). Even though aiming at different applications with different product requirements, the additive manufacturing processes in tissue and food engineering have much in common.

The growing field of cultivated meat/fish is a strong demonstration case. Structuring edible cellular structures in a layer-by-layer fashion is considered one of the most promising technologies available to develop more sustainable and suffering-free meat alternatives with customizable color, texture, appearance, flavor, and nutrition. Along with these developments, tissue engineers are creating more complex, multi-cellular structures to produce fully functional living tissues or 3D cell culture models.

With this Special Issue, we envisage fostering synergies and advances, and inspiring bio-based manufacturing research in these complementary fields.

We invite researchers to contribute to this Special Issue, e.g., on the following topics:

  • Bio-based inks
  • Tissue, meat, fish, plant cells, probiotics or fungi applications
  • Structuring mechanisms
  • Printing heads systems
  • Personalization
  • Rheology, Texture, FEA, flow-dynamics studies
  • Scale-up approaches

Dr. Sara Oliveira
Guest Editors
Prof. Dr. Lorenzo M. Pastrana
Dr. Pablo Fuciños
Co-Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Polymers is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • 3D Printing
  • 3D Food Printing
  • Bioprinting
  • 3D printing of biomaterials
  • Plant-based meat/fish
  • cell-based meat/fish
  • Printability
  • Texture
  • Functionality
  • Bio-based Inks

Published Papers (2 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Article
Bioprintable Lung Extracellular Matrix Hydrogel Scaffolds for 3D Culture of Mesenchymal Stromal Cells
Polymers 2021, 13(14), 2350; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym13142350 - 18 Jul 2021
Viewed by 826
Abstract
Mesenchymal stromal cell (MSC)-based cell therapy in acute respiratory diseases is based on MSC secretion of paracrine factors. Several strategies have proposed to improve this are being explored including pre-conditioning the MSCs prior to administration. We here propose a strategy for improving the [...] Read more.
Mesenchymal stromal cell (MSC)-based cell therapy in acute respiratory diseases is based on MSC secretion of paracrine factors. Several strategies have proposed to improve this are being explored including pre-conditioning the MSCs prior to administration. We here propose a strategy for improving the therapeutic efficacy of MSCs based on cell preconditioning by growing them in native extracellular matrix (ECM) derived from the lung. To this end, a bioink with tunable stiffness based on decellularized porcine lung ECM hydrogels was developed and characterized. The bioink was suitable for 3D culturing of lung-resident MSCs without the need for additional chemical or physical crosslinking. MSCs showed good viability, and contraction assays showed the existence of cell–matrix interactions in the bioprinted scaffolds. Adhesion capacity and length of the focal adhesions formed were increased for the cells cultured within the lung hydrogel scaffolds. Also, there was more than a 20-fold increase of the expression of the CXCR4 receptor in the 3D-cultured cells compared to the cells cultured in plastic. Secretion of cytokines when cultured in an in vitro model of lung injury showed a decreased secretion of pro-inflammatory mediators for the cells cultured in the 3D scaffolds. Moreover, the morphology of the harvested cells was markedly different with respect to conventionally (2D) cultured MSCs. In conclusion, the developed bioink can be used to bioprint structures aimed to improve preconditioning MSCs for therapeutic purposes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bio-Based Additive Manufacturing in Food and Tissue Engineering)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Comparative Study of the Structural Properties, Color, Bioactive Compounds Content and Antioxidant Capacity of Aerated Gelatin Gels Enriched with Cryoconcentrated Blueberry Juice during Storage
Polymers 2020, 12(12), 2769; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym12122769 - 24 Nov 2020
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1115
Abstract
Cryoconcentrated blueberry juice (CBJ) was incorporated into aerated gelatin gel and the effects on the mechanical properties, phenolic compounds and antioxidant activity (AA) were evaluated at day 1 and day 28 under refrigerated storage. At day 1, 8 g of gelatin gel and [...] Read more.
Cryoconcentrated blueberry juice (CBJ) was incorporated into aerated gelatin gel and the effects on the mechanical properties, phenolic compounds and antioxidant activity (AA) were evaluated at day 1 and day 28 under refrigerated storage. At day 1, 8 g of gelatin gel and 40 g of CBJ (called M5) exhibited a soft texture and heterogeneous and non-spherical small bubbles, with values close to 10.5, 8.0 and 7.1 N, for hardness, gumminess and chewiness, respectively. M5 presented an increase of approximately 1.7, 1.9 and 1.9, and 1.2, 1.8, 2.1 and 1.3 times in comparison to the other samples, for total polyphenol, anthocyanin and flavonoid contents, and individual phenolic compounds, 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH), ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) and oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC) assays, respectively. At day 28, the samples showed a weakening of the 3D network, with high degradation of phenolic compounds and AA due to the oxidation, polymerization and syneresis. Therefore, CBJ might be an interesting functional ingredient to add to (aerated and non-aerated) gelatin gel without affecting its properties, and thus different food products with high nutritional values and without added artificial sweeteners could be developed. Additionally, the gelatin gel/CBJ combinations might be suitable for additive manufacturing as a coating of food matrices. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bio-Based Additive Manufacturing in Food and Tissue Engineering)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Back to TopTop