Special Issue "Pharmacist Services"

A special issue of Pharmacy (ISSN 2226-4787).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 April 2019

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Jon Schommer

College of Pharmacy, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455, USA
Website | E-Mail
Interests: information processing and decision making related to the provision, use, and evaluation of drug products and pharmacist services
Guest Editor
Dr. Anthony Olson

University of Minnesota, College of Pharmacy
Website | E-Mail
Interests: improved understanding, development, and evaluation of pharmacist-delivered patient-centered care within health systems and policy

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We invite you to submit a manuscript to the “Pharmacist Services” Special Issue in the journal Pharmacy—an open access journal with a focus on pharmacy education and practice.

As an example, you may wish to take a look at previous special issues: https://www.mdpi.com/journal/pharmacy/special_issues

If the Special Issue publishes more than 10 papers, the publisher will print a book edition. The book would be made available, in digital format (for free) and paperback copies (ordered via Amazon) on the MDPI platform (http://books.mdpi.com).

Pharmacy (ISSN 2226-4787) is an international scientific open access journal on pharmacy education and practice published quarterly online by MDPI. The journal has already been indexed by PubMed, ESCI (Emerging Sources Citation Index), and Web of Science. Furthermore, Pharmacy is a member of the Committee on Publication Ethics (COPE), and, accordingly, submissions are peer reviewed rigorously to ensure that they conform to the highest standards in their field.

For the Special Issue on “Pharmacist Services” we seek a full breadth of manuscripts including, but not limited to the following topics: (1) the history and development of pharmacist services, (2) service settings, (3) service management, (4) service profitability, (5) service recovery, (6) service relationships, (7) service quality, (8) service tailoring, (9), service design and standards, (10) service performance, and (11) service evaluation. We seek manuscripts of all types including: (1) reviews, (2) commentaries, (3) idea papers, (4) case studies, (5) demonstration studies, and (6) research studies.

The overall goal of this Special Issue on “Pharmacist Services” is to give the reader a state-of-the-art synopsis of the pharmacist services domain at this point in time. To accomplish this goal, we seek papers that address the social, psychosocial, political, legal, historic, clinical, and economic factors that are associated with pharmacist services. Papers that translate concepts from other domains into the pharmacist services realm will be instructive to our audience and are welcome for this Special Issue.

Please note that we have framed this special issue using ideas published by renowned experts in the services management and marketing domains including: Teresa Swartz, Dawn Iacobucci, Roland Rust, Richard Oliver, Valerie Zeithaml, and Mary Jo Bitner. We will certainly consider papers that use other frameworks, but wanted to let you know about the foundational context that we will be using as we construct this Special Issue.

Thank you for considering this invitation.

Dr. Jon Schommer
Dr. Anthony Olson
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Pharmacy is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 550 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Pharmacist Services
  • Service Development and Implementation
  • Service Quality
  • Service Marketing and Management
  • Service Evaluation

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle Administration, Billing, and Payment for Pharmacy Student-Based Immunizations to Medicare Beneficiaries at Mobile Medicare Clinics
Received: 30 January 2019 / Revised: 19 February 2019 / Accepted: 21 February 2019 / Published: 25 February 2019
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Abstract
Training student pharmacists to administer vaccinations requires a substantial investment in vaccines, supplies, and time. Few schools of pharmacy seek out or receive any reimbursement for the provision of vaccines, despite the fact it is a covered service. This study sought to implement, [...] Read more.
Training student pharmacists to administer vaccinations requires a substantial investment in vaccines, supplies, and time. Few schools of pharmacy seek out or receive any reimbursement for the provision of vaccines, despite the fact it is a covered service. This study sought to implement, deliver, and demonstrate an innovative, financially sustainable curriculum-based immunization program by trained pharmacy students as part of their experiential learning. Thirty-nine community health clinics targeting Medicare beneficiaries were conducted throughout Northern/Central California during Medicare’s fall open enrollment periods between 2014–2016. American Pharmacists Association (APhA)-trained student pharmacists (under licensed pharmacist supervision) administered 1777 vaccinations. Vaccines were billed via a secure Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (HIPAA)-compliant web-based portal. The total net income was $11,905 and $8032 for 2015 and 2016, respectively. Return on investment was greatest for the influenza vaccine > Tdap > pneumococcal. Pharmacy students are already being trained to provide immunizations and can utilize their skills to deliver financially viable public health programs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Pharmacist Services)
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Open AccessArticle Dispensing of Prescribed Medicines in Swiss Community Pharmacies-Observed Counselling Activities
Received: 22 November 2018 / Revised: 12 December 2018 / Accepted: 15 December 2018 / Published: 21 December 2018
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Abstract
Background: Patient counselling and addressing drug-related problems are the pharmacist’s key activities to ensure the safe and effective use of medicines. This study aimed to describe the dispensing practice of prescribed medicines in daily community pharmacy practice and to identify factors influencing [...] Read more.
Background: Patient counselling and addressing drug-related problems are the pharmacist’s key activities to ensure the safe and effective use of medicines. This study aimed to describe the dispensing practice of prescribed medicines in daily community pharmacy practice and to identify factors influencing counselling provision; Methods: An observational study was conducted in community pharmacies in Basel, Switzerland. One master student in pharmacy performed non-participatory observations for one day at each of the participating community pharmacies. Patient characteristics, counselling content, additional activities, and pharmaceutical interventions were documented on a structured checklist; Results: 556 prescription encounters (PE) in 18 participating community pharmacies were observed (269 first prescriptions; 287 refill prescriptions). Patients were regular customers (n = 523, 94.1%) and 53.8 ± 23.4 years old. Counselling was provided to 367 (66.0%) customers on 2.9 ± 3.1 themes per PE. Factors influencing counselling were dispensing by the pharmacist, new customer, customer who did not refuse counselling, customer with a first prescription, with a prescription resulting in a pharmaceutical intervention, and a prescription filled by carers. During 144 PEs, 203 interventions were documented. Pharmacists proposed few additional activities and performed no cognitive pharmaceutical service; Conclusions: Our study quantified counselling and additional services at the dispensing of prescribed medicines and identified influencing factors on counselling provision at the patient, prescription, and pharmacy level. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Pharmacist Services)
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Other

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Open AccessPerspective Establishing a New Ambulatory Care Practice Site as a Pharmacy Practice Faculty
Pharmacy 2018, 6(4), 111; https://doi.org/10.3390/pharmacy6040111
Received: 29 August 2018 / Revised: 4 October 2018 / Accepted: 9 October 2018 / Published: 11 October 2018
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Abstract
There is an imminent need to identify and develop new ambulatory care practice sites with the increase in the number of colleges of pharmacy across the nation. This manuscript provides recommendations to help clinical faculty determine whether a potential pharmacy practice site will [...] Read more.
There is an imminent need to identify and develop new ambulatory care practice sites with the increase in the number of colleges of pharmacy across the nation. This manuscript provides recommendations to help clinical faculty determine whether a potential pharmacy practice site will be able to provide adequate resources and support to establish a successful practice. This may be challenging to pharmacy practice faculty in settings where clinical pharmacy services have never been utilized. Topics include the pre-work needed prior to approaching a new practice site, assessing the need for physical requirements, meeting key personnel, marketing clinical skills and services, implementing, and evaluating practice site. Preparation includes having a clear vision of the pharmacist services, ensuring that stakeholders have an understanding of the pharmacy services inquiring the site support and resources for the pharmacist, and regularly communicating. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Pharmacist Services)
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