Special Issue "Dairy Products Consumption for Human Health"

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 August 2019).

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Sandra Abreu
E-Mail Website1 Website2
Guest Editor
1. Centro de Investigação em Actividade Fìsica, Saúde e Lazer (CIAFEL), University of Porto
2. Faculty of Psychology, Education and Sports, Lusófona University of Porto, Portugal
Interests: diet; nutrition; dietary pattern; dairy products; obesity; cancer; nutritional assessment

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Dairy products are key contributors to dietary quality, since, in a mixed diet, they provide a considerable amount of nutrients. In the last decade, increasing attention has been focused on the impact of dairy products, particularly milk, on health, suggesting a neutral or protective effect against obesity, cardiovascular disease, metabolic syndrome, some cancers, inflammation, and type 2 diabetes.

This Special Issue of Nutrients will address the impact of dairy product consumption on human health. Hence, we welcome the submission of original research articles or reviews investigating the association between the consumption of dairy products or their components and health throughout the lifespan. Health conditions could include, but are not restricted to, obesity, cardiovascular disease, metabolic syndrome, cancer, type 2 diabetes, neurodegenerative disease, and bone and mental health.

Dr. Sandra Abreu
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nutrients is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Dairy products
  • Obesity
  • Cardiovascular disease
  • Metabolic syndrome
  • Cancer
  • Type 2 diabetes
  • Bone
  • Mental health
  • Neurodegenerative disease

Published Papers (7 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Participation in the School Milk Program Contributes to Increased Milk Consumption and Dietary Nutrient Intake by Middle School Students in South Korea
Nutrients 2019, 11(10), 2386; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11102386 - 06 Oct 2019
Abstract
Milk is considered to be one of the main food sources of calcium for promoting growth and bone health in children and adolescents. This study investigated whether or not participation in a school milk program affected milk consumption and nutrient intake by middle [...] Read more.
Milk is considered to be one of the main food sources of calcium for promoting growth and bone health in children and adolescents. This study investigated whether or not participation in a school milk program affected milk consumption and nutrient intake by middle school students in South Korea. In total, 692 middle school students aged 13–16 years old were enrolled in two groups: the school milk program participant group (n = 346) and the non-participant group (n = 346). The survey examined normal milk consumption status in both groups. The diet record method was applied to analyze the amount of nutrient intake levels. Milk/dairy product consumption was significantly higher in the school milk program participant group for both boys and girls (p < 0.001). The school milk program participant group also generally showed higher energy and dietary nutrient intake levels as compared to the non-participant group for both genders (p < 0.05). No differences were observed in milk consumption at home or outside school, and calcium intake from animal-derived foods was higher in the school milk program participant group (p < 0.001). Therefore, it can be assumed that participating in the school milk program directly resulted in higher calcium intake. Hence, we can report that participating in the school milk program contributes to increased milk consumption and improved the overall nutrient intake. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dairy Products Consumption for Human Health)
Open AccessArticle
Association of Dairy Product Consumption with Metabolic and Inflammatory Biomarkers in Adolescents: A Cross-Sectional Analysis from the LabMed Study
Nutrients 2019, 11(10), 2268; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11102268 - 21 Sep 2019
Abstract
This study aimed to investigate the association between dairy product consumption and metabolic and inflammatory biomarkers in Portuguese adolescents, and whether the association differed by weight status. A cross-sectional study was conducted during the school year 2011/2012 with 412 Portuguese adolescents (52.4% girls) [...] Read more.
This study aimed to investigate the association between dairy product consumption and metabolic and inflammatory biomarkers in Portuguese adolescents, and whether the association differed by weight status. A cross-sectional study was conducted during the school year 2011/2012 with 412 Portuguese adolescents (52.4% girls) in 7th and 10th grade (aged 12 to 18 years old). The World Health Organization cutoffs were used to categorize adolescents as non-overweight (NW) or overweight (OW). Blood samples were collected to analyze C-reactive protein (CRP), interleukin-6 (IL-6), leptin, and adiponectin. Dairy product intake was evaluated using a food frequency questionnaire. Participants were divided by tertiles according to the amount of dairy product consumed. The associations between dairy product consumption with metabolic and inflammatory biomarkers were evaluated using generalized linear regression models with logarithmic link and gamma distribution and adjusted for potential confounders. The majority of adolescents were NW (67.2%). NW adolescents had lower IL-6, CRP, and leptin concentration than their counterparts (p < 0.05, for all comparisons). Higher levels of total dairy product and milk intake were inversely associated with IL-6 (P for trend <0.05, for all) in NW adolescents, but not in OW adolescents. NW adolescents in the second tertile of yogurt consumption had lower level of IL-6 compared to those in the first tertile (p = 0.004). Our results suggest an inverse association between total dairy product and milk intake and serum concentrations of IL-6 only among NW adolescents. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dairy Products Consumption for Human Health)
Open AccessArticle
In Vitro Antithrombotic and Hypocholesterolemic Activities of Milk Fermented with Specific Strains of Lactococcus lactis
Nutrients 2019, 11(9), 2150; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11092150 - 09 Sep 2019
Abstract
Milk fermented with specific lactic acid bacteria (LAB) was reported to be a rich source of metabolites, such as peptides with different biological activities that may have a positive effect on cardiovascular health. Thus, in this study, the antithrombotic and hypocholesterolemic activities of [...] Read more.
Milk fermented with specific lactic acid bacteria (LAB) was reported to be a rich source of metabolites, such as peptides with different biological activities that may have a positive effect on cardiovascular health. Thus, in this study, the antithrombotic and hypocholesterolemic activities of fermented milk with specific strains of Lactococcus lactis were investigated before and after exposure to a simulated gastrointestinal digestion (SGD) model. The inhibition of thrombin-induced fibrin polymerization (IC50 peptide concentration necessary to inhibit thrombin activity by 50%), anticoagulant activity, inhibition of micellar solubility of cholesterol and bile acid binding capacity of water soluble fractions (WSF) <3 kDa from fermented milk were evaluated. Results indicated that the WSF from fermented milk with Lc-572 showed antithrombotic (IC50 = 0.049 mg/mL) and hypocholesterolemic (55% inhibition of micellar solubility of cholesterol and 27% bile acid binding capacity) activities. Meanwhile, fermented milk with Lc-571 showed mainly antithrombotic activity (IC50 = 0.045 mg/mL). On the other hand, fermented milk with Lc-600 presented mainly hypocholesterolemic activity (31.4% inhibition of micellar solubility of and 70% bile acid binding capacity). Moreover, biological activities were not lost after simulated gastrointestinal digestion conditions. Thus, fermented milk with these specific L. lactis strains show potential for the development of functional foods. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dairy Products Consumption for Human Health)
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Open AccessArticle
Increasing Selenium and Vitamin E in Dairy Cow Milk Improves the Quality of the Milk as Food for Children
Nutrients 2019, 11(6), 1218; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11061218 - 29 May 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
In this study, we investigated the beneficial effects of milk biofortified with antioxidants on the health of children. Two experiments were conducted: experiment one evaluated the milk of 24 Jersey dairy cows (450 ± 25 kg of body weight (BW); 60 ± 30 [...] Read more.
In this study, we investigated the beneficial effects of milk biofortified with antioxidants on the health of children. Two experiments were conducted: experiment one evaluated the milk of 24 Jersey dairy cows (450 ± 25 kg of body weight (BW); 60 ± 30 days in milk dry matter intake (DIM)) given different diet treatments (CON = control diet; COANT = diet with vitamin E and selenium as antioxidants; OIL = diet with sunflower oil; and OANT = diet with sunflower oil containing more vitamin E and selenium as antioxidants), and experiment two evaluated the effect of the milk produced in the first experiment on the health of children (CON = control diet; COANT = diet with vitamin E and selenium as antioxidants; OIL = diet with sunflower oil; OANT = diet with sunflower oil containing more vitamin E and selenium as antioxidants; and SM = skim milk). One hundred children (8 to 10 years old) were evaluated in the second experiment. Blood samples were collected at 0 days of milk intake and 28 and 84 days after the start of milk intake. The cows fed the COANT and OANT diets showed greater selenium and vitamin E concentrations in their milk (p = 0.001), and the children who consumed the milk from those cows had higher concentrations of selenium and vitamin E in their blood (p = 0.001). The platelet (p = 0.001) and lymphocyte (p = 0.001) concentrations were increased in the blood of the children that consumed milk from cows fed the OANT diet compared to those in the children that consumed SM (p = 0.001). The children who consumed milk from cows fed the OIL diet treatment had increased concentrations of low density lipoprotein (LDL) and total cholesterol in their blood at the end of the supplementation period compared to children who consumed SM. The results of this study demonstrate that the consumption of biofortified milk increases the blood concentrations of selenium and vitamin E in children, which may be beneficial to their health. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dairy Products Consumption for Human Health)

Review

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Open AccessReview
Dairy Fat Consumption and the Risk of Metabolic Syndrome: An Examination of the Saturated Fatty Acids in Dairy
Nutrients 2019, 11(9), 2200; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11092200 - 12 Sep 2019
Abstract
Lifestyle is a key modifiable risk factor involved in the manifestation of metabolic syndrome and, in particular, diet plays a pivotal role in its prevention and development. Current dietary guidelines discourage the consumption of saturated fat and dietary sources rich in saturated fat, [...] Read more.
Lifestyle is a key modifiable risk factor involved in the manifestation of metabolic syndrome and, in particular, diet plays a pivotal role in its prevention and development. Current dietary guidelines discourage the consumption of saturated fat and dietary sources rich in saturated fat, such as dairy products, despite data suggesting that full-fat dairy consumption is protective against metabolic syndrome. This narrative review assessed the recent epidemiological and clinical research that examined the consumption of dairy-derived saturated fatty acids (SFA) on metabolic syndrome risk. In addition, this review evaluated studies of individual SFA to gain insight into the potential mechanisms at play with intake of a diet enriched with these dairy-derived fatty acids. This work underscores that SFA are a heterogenous class of fatty acids that can differ considerably in their biological activity within the body depending on their length and specific chemical structure. In summary, previous work on the impact of dairy-derived SFA consumption on disease risk suggests that there is currently insufficient evidence to support current dietary guidelines which consolidate all dietary SFA into a single group of nutrients whose consumption should be reduced, regardless of dietary source, food matrix, and composition. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dairy Products Consumption for Human Health)
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Open AccessReview
Total Dairy, Cheese and Milk Intake and Arterial Stiffness: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis of Cross-Sectional Studies
Nutrients 2019, 11(4), 741; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11040741 - 29 Mar 2019
Cited by 3
Abstract
The aim of this review was to determine the relationship between dairy product consumption and arterial stiffness, measured by pulse wave velocity (PWV). We systematically searched the Medline, Embase and Web of Science databases until 30 January 2019 for cross-sectional data from studies [...] Read more.
The aim of this review was to determine the relationship between dairy product consumption and arterial stiffness, measured by pulse wave velocity (PWV). We systematically searched the Medline, Embase and Web of Science databases until 30 January 2019 for cross-sectional data from studies addressing the association between dairy product consumption and PWV. This study was registered with PROSPERO (CRD42018110528). Both the inverse-variance fixed effects method and the DerSimonian and Laird method were used to compute pooled estimates of effect size (ES) and the respective 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Seven studies were included in the meta-analysis, with a total of 16,443 patients. Total dairy product (ES = −0.03; 95% CI [−0.04, −0.01]) and cheese (ES = −0.04; 95% CI [−0.07, −0.01]) consumption were weak, but significantly associated with lower PWV levels. Conversely, milk intake showed no significant association with PWV (ES = 0.02; 95% CI [−0.01, 0.05]). Heterogeneity in the ES was not important for the three groups of dairy products assessed. This systematic review and meta-analysis of seven studies found no detrimental effects of dairy product consumption on arterial stiffness measured by PWV. Due to the scarcity of studies, further investigations are warranted to clarify the role of dairy products on arterial stiffness. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dairy Products Consumption for Human Health)
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Open AccessReview
Glycomacropeptide Bioactivity and Health: A Review Highlighting Action Mechanisms and Signaling Pathways
Nutrients 2019, 11(3), 598; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11030598 - 12 Mar 2019
Abstract
Food-derived bioactive peptides are reported as beneficial and safe for human health. Glycomacropeptide (GMP) is a milk-protein-derived peptide that, in addition to its nutritional value, retains many biological properties and has therapeutic effects in several inflammatory disorders. GMP was shown under in vitro [...] Read more.
Food-derived bioactive peptides are reported as beneficial and safe for human health. Glycomacropeptide (GMP) is a milk-protein-derived peptide that, in addition to its nutritional value, retains many biological properties and has therapeutic effects in several inflammatory disorders. GMP was shown under in vitro and in vivo conditions to exert a number of activities that regulate the physiology of important body systems, namely the gastrointestinal, endocrine, and immune systems. This review represents a comprehensive compilation summarizing the current knowledge and updated information on the major biological properties associated with GMP. GMP bioactivity is addressed with special attention on mechanisms of action, signaling pathways involved, and structural characteristics implicated. In addition, the results of various studies dealing with the effects of GMP on models of inflammatory diseases are reviewed and discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dairy Products Consumption for Human Health)
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