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Yogurt Consumption and Metabolic Health

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643). This special issue belongs to the section "Nutrition and Metabolism".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (1 January 2021) | Viewed by 11847

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
1. Research Centre in Physical Activity, Health, and Leisure (CIAFEL), Faculty of Sport, University of Porto, 4200-450 Porto, Portugal
2. Laboratory for Integrative and Translational Research in Population Health, 4050-600 Porto, Portugal
3. School of Life Sciences and Environment, University of Trás-os-Montes, and Alto Douro (UTAD), 5000-801 Vila Real, Portugal
Interests: nutrition; dietary patterns; nutritional epidemiology; obesity; diet assessment; dietary surveys
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Guest Editor
National Dairy Council, 10255 West Higgins Road, Suite 900, Rosemont, IL 60018-5616, USA
Interests: dairy; milk; metabolic health; vitamin and mineral metabolism

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

For this Special Issue of Nutrients, we welcome the submission of original research articles and systematic reviews or meta-analyses investigating the association between the consumption of yogurt or its components and metabolic health in human or animal models.

Fermented foods—including yogurt—have been staples of the human diet for thousands of years. Fermented foods tend to possess enhanced nutritional and health-promoting properties. For instance, yogurt is a source of live, active bacteria that can contribute to human health by helping to maintain a healthy gut microbiota. In addition, studies have shown that yogurt provides health benefits beyond simply nutrition due to the unique bioactive compounds created during the fermentation process. Indeed, a growing body of literature recognises the beneficial effects of yogurt on metabolic health and its risk factors in healthy and non-healthy individuals (e.g., individuals with obesity or type 2 diabetes). Despite these promising results, questions remain about the mechanisms underlying the beneficial effects of yogurt and its food matrix effect, with regard to overall dietary patterns, on metabolic health and its risk factors.

Potential topics for this Special Issue include, but are not limited to, the effects of yogurt on chronic inflammation, digestive health, glucose tolerance, cardiovascular risk, cholesterol levels, blood pressure, and weight management/obesity.

Dr. Sandra Abreu
Dr. Christopher J. Cifelli
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nutrients is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Yogurt
  • metabolic health
  • digestive health
  • inflammation
  • obesity-related diseases
  • fermented milk

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

13 pages, 280 KiB  
Article
Yogurt Consumption Is Associated with Lower Levels of Chronic Inflammation in the Framingham Offspring Study
by Mengjie Yuan, Martha R. Singer and Lynn L. Moore
Nutrients 2021, 13(2), 506; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13020506 - 4 Feb 2021
Cited by 9 | Viewed by 6508
Abstract
Some studies suggest that dairy foods may be linked with less chronic inflammation. However, few studies have investigated the separate effects of different types of dairy on inflammation. Therefore, the current study aims to examine the separate prospective impacts of milk, yogurt and [...] Read more.
Some studies suggest that dairy foods may be linked with less chronic inflammation. However, few studies have investigated the separate effects of different types of dairy on inflammation. Therefore, the current study aims to examine the separate prospective impacts of milk, yogurt and cheese on biomarkers of chronic inflammation in 1753 community-dwelling participants of the Framingham Offspring Study (FOS). Mean intakes of dairy foods were derived from two sets of three-day diet records. Six inflammatory biomarkers were assessed approximately seven years later at exam 7. Results showed that those who consumed yogurt (vs. those who did not) had statistically significantly lower levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6) (mean log-transformed levels of 1.31 and 1.26 in consumers/non-consumers, respectively, p = 0.02) and fibrin (mean log-transformed levels of 5.91 and 5.89 in consumers/non-consumers, respectively, p = 0.03). The inverse association between IL-6 and yogurt consumption was similar in participants who were of normal weight and those who were overweight. For fibrin, the effects were stronger in overweight individuals. No statistically significant associations were observed between any of these inflammation biomarkers and milk or cheese intakes. Overall, our study compared the separate impacts of three types of dairy foods on chronic inflammation and found that only yogurt intake was linked with lower levels of chronic inflammation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Yogurt Consumption and Metabolic Health)
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14 pages, 576 KiB  
Article
Association of Yogurt Consumption with Nutrient Intakes, Nutrient Adequacy, and Diet Quality in American Children and Adults
by Christopher J. Cifelli, Sanjiv Agarwal and Victor L. Fulgoni III
Nutrients 2020, 12(11), 3435; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12113435 - 9 Nov 2020
Cited by 23 | Viewed by 4640
Abstract
The popularity of yogurt has increased among consumers due to its perceived health benefits. This study examined the cross-sectional association between yogurt consumption and nutrient intake/adequacy, dietary quality, and body weight in children and adults. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2001–2016 data [...] Read more.
The popularity of yogurt has increased among consumers due to its perceived health benefits. This study examined the cross-sectional association between yogurt consumption and nutrient intake/adequacy, dietary quality, and body weight in children and adults. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2001–2016 data (n = 65,799) were used and yogurt consumers were defined as those having any amount of yogurt during in-person 24-h diet recall. Usual intakes of nutrients were determined using the National Cancer Institute method and diet quality was calculated using the Healthy Eating Index-2015 (HEI-2015) scores after adjusting data for demographic and lifestyle factors. The data show that approximately 6.4% children and 5.5% adults consume yogurt, with a mean intake of yogurt of 150 ± 3 and 182 ± 3 g/d, respectively. Yogurt consumers had higher diet quality (10.3% and 15.2% higher HEI-2015 scores for children and adults, respectively); higher intakes of fiber, calcium, magnesium, potassium, and vitamin D; and higher percent of the population meeting recommended intakes for calcium, magnesium, and potassium than non-consumers. Consumption of yogurt was also associated with lower body weight, body mass index (BMI), and 23% showed a lower risk of being overweight/obese among adults only. In conclusion, yogurt consumption was associated with higher nutrient intake, nutrient adequacy, and diet quality in both children and adults. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Yogurt Consumption and Metabolic Health)
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