Next Article in Journal
Non-Nutritive (Artificial) Sweetener Knowledge among University Students
Next Article in Special Issue
Association of Dairy Product Consumption with Metabolic and Inflammatory Biomarkers in Adolescents: A Cross-Sectional Analysis from the LabMed Study
Previous Article in Journal
Relationships of Trait Anxiety and Loss of Control Eating with Serum Leptin Concentrations among Youth
Previous Article in Special Issue
In Vitro Antithrombotic and Hypocholesterolemic Activities of Milk Fermented with Specific Strains of Lactococcus lactis
Open AccessReview

Dairy Fat Consumption and the Risk of Metabolic Syndrome: An Examination of the Saturated Fatty Acids in Dairy

1
Department of Animal and Veterinary Sciences, The University of Vermont, Burlington, VT 05405, USA, [email protected]
2
National Dairy Council, Rosemont, IL 60018, USA
3
Department of Medicine, Division of Endocrinology, Metabolism and Diabetes, The University of Vermont, Colchester, VT 05446, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2019, 11(9), 2200; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11092200
Received: 14 August 2019 / Revised: 4 September 2019 / Accepted: 6 September 2019 / Published: 12 September 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dairy Products Consumption for Human Health)
Lifestyle is a key modifiable risk factor involved in the manifestation of metabolic syndrome and, in particular, diet plays a pivotal role in its prevention and development. Current dietary guidelines discourage the consumption of saturated fat and dietary sources rich in saturated fat, such as dairy products, despite data suggesting that full-fat dairy consumption is protective against metabolic syndrome. This narrative review assessed the recent epidemiological and clinical research that examined the consumption of dairy-derived saturated fatty acids (SFA) on metabolic syndrome risk. In addition, this review evaluated studies of individual SFA to gain insight into the potential mechanisms at play with intake of a diet enriched with these dairy-derived fatty acids. This work underscores that SFA are a heterogenous class of fatty acids that can differ considerably in their biological activity within the body depending on their length and specific chemical structure. In summary, previous work on the impact of dairy-derived SFA consumption on disease risk suggests that there is currently insufficient evidence to support current dietary guidelines which consolidate all dietary SFA into a single group of nutrients whose consumption should be reduced, regardless of dietary source, food matrix, and composition. View Full-Text
Keywords: abdominal obesity; branched-chain fatty acids; cardiometabolic; dyslipidemia; hyperglycemia; hypertension; insulin resistance; medium-chain fatty acids; odd-chain fatty acids; short-chain fatty acids abdominal obesity; branched-chain fatty acids; cardiometabolic; dyslipidemia; hyperglycemia; hypertension; insulin resistance; medium-chain fatty acids; odd-chain fatty acids; short-chain fatty acids
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Unger, A.L.; Torres-Gonzalez, M.; Kraft, J. Dairy Fat Consumption and the Risk of Metabolic Syndrome: An Examination of the Saturated Fatty Acids in Dairy. Nutrients 2019, 11, 2200.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop