Special Issue "Advances in Legumes for Human Nutrition"

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643). This special issue belongs to the section "Phytochemicals and Human Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 May 2022 | Viewed by 3611

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Stuart Johnson
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Molecular and Life Sciences, Faculty of Science and Engineering, Curtin University, Perth, Australia
Interests: grains, sorghum, and pulses; grains and chronic disease; grains and nutraceuticals; grains and novel biomaterials
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dr. Rewati Bhattarai
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Molecular and Life Sciences, Faculty of Science and Engineering, Curtin University, Perth, Australia
Interests: grains, legumes, and cereals; plant proteins, modification and functionality; food matrices, grains and nutrition

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We are very excited to advise you of the Nutrients special edition “Advances in Legumes for Human Nutrition”. Recently, the importance of legumes as human food has become even greater given the need for sustainable and increased food supply for the rapidly growing global population in an environment of climate change. Legume seeds, intact or milled into flour offer a complex array of macro- and micronutrients and phytochemicals for human nutrition. Additionally, they can be fractionated into their component proteins, starches, lipids and dietary fibre as health- and techno-functional food ingredients. These ingredients are now in great demand by the food industry for example in the manufacture of vegetarian and vegan dairy and meat analogues with good nutritional profiles. However, issues such as micronutrient availability, antinutrients and allergenicity still require solutions for maximum uptake of legumes into the human diet. We invite to you to submit relevant manuscripts on the topic of “Advances in Legumes for Human Nutrition”. We invite manuscripts that address any aspect of this broad topic including the impact of innovative food technologies on nutritional value of legumes and manuscripts focusing on nutritional properties of seeds from underutilised members of Fabaceae (Leguminosae) family. 

Dr. Stuart Johnson
Dr. Rewati Bhattarai
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nutrients is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • legumes
  • pulses
  • nutrition
  • health
  • composition
  • phytochemicals
  • antinutritional factors

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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Article
Innovative Application of Phytochemicals from Fermented Legumes and Spices/Herbs Added in Extruded Snacks
Nutrients 2021, 13(12), 4538; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13124538 - 17 Dec 2021
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Abstract
A trend related to adding legume seeds to various products has been observed. This work aimed to use fermented red bean/broad bean seeds and their hulls to produce extruded snacks with more beneficial nutritional properties and good sensory quality. Extruded snacks containing fermented [...] Read more.
A trend related to adding legume seeds to various products has been observed. This work aimed to use fermented red bean/broad bean seeds and their hulls to produce extruded snacks with more beneficial nutritional properties and good sensory quality. Extruded snacks containing fermented ground seeds (50%) or hull (10%) of red bean/broad bean and corn grits with the addition of selected herbs/spices (0.5%) were prepared. The chemical composition, phenolic profile, antioxidant activity, and sensory quality were analysed. The results showed that the protein content ranged from 9 to 22.9 g 100 g−1, phenolic compounds ranged from 3.97 to 12.80 mg 100 g−1 (with the addition of herbs/spices, even up to 62.88 mg 100 g−1), and antioxidant activities ranged from 4.32 to 10.23 Trolox g−1 (ABTS assay), depending on the type of fermented materials. The addition of ground seeds/hull did not influence the consumer desirability, whereas the addition of selected herbs/spices, particularly lovage, increased it. The application of fermented red bean and broad bean seeds and their hulls, as part of the assumptions of the planetary diet, enabled enrichment of extruded corn products, which are often consumed by vegans and vegetarians, with nutritionally valuable ingredients. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Legumes for Human Nutrition)
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Article
Sensory Characteristics and Nutritional Quality of Food Products Made with a Biofortified and Lectin Free Common Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) Flour
Nutrients 2021, 13(12), 4517; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13124517 - 17 Dec 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 995
Abstract
Common beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) are an important source of nutrients with beneficial effects on human health. However, they contain lectins, that limit the direct use of flour in food preparations without thermal treatment, and phytic acid, that reduces mineral cation bioavailability. [...] Read more.
Common beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) are an important source of nutrients with beneficial effects on human health. However, they contain lectins, that limit the direct use of flour in food preparations without thermal treatment, and phytic acid, that reduces mineral cation bioavailability. The objectives of this research were: to obtain biofortified snacks and a cream using an untreated common bean flour devoid of active lectins (lec) and with reduced content of phytic acid (lpa) and to evaluate the sensorial appreciation for these products. The main results of the present work were: the products with the lpa lec flour did not retain residual hemagglutinating activity due to lectins; they showed higher residual α-amylase inhibitor activity (from 2.2 to 135 times), reduced in vitro predicted glycemic index (about 5 units reduction) and increased iron bioavailability compared to the products with wild type flour; products with common bean flour were less appreciated than the reference ones without this flour, but the presence of an intense umami taste can be a positive attribute. Results confirmed that the use of the lpa lec flour has important advantages in the preparation of safe and nutritionally improved products, and provide useful information to identify target consumers, such as children and elderly people. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Legumes for Human Nutrition)
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Review

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Review
Legume Proteins and Peptides as Compounds in Nutraceuticals: A Structural Basis for Dietary Health Effects
Nutrients 2022, 14(6), 1188; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu14061188 - 11 Mar 2022
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Abstract
In the current climate of food security, quality aspects of legume crops have primary market economic and health impact. Legume proteins and peptides have been discovered to have a role far beyond supplying amino acids for growth and maintenance of body tissues. Several [...] Read more.
In the current climate of food security, quality aspects of legume crops have primary market economic and health impact. Legume proteins and peptides have been discovered to have a role far beyond supplying amino acids for growth and maintenance of body tissues. Several proteins (enzymatic inhibitors, lectins, storage globulins) and peptides derived from them (lunasin, hydrophobic peptides) have shown anticarcinogenic, hypocholesterolemic, glucose-lowering, antioxidant, antimicrobial, and immunostimulant properties. Further understanding of how structural features of legume proteins affect in vivo digestion and production of bioactive sequences represents a key step in the valorization of nutraceutical potentiality of legume proteins and peptides derived from them. In this work, the relationship between structure and bioavailability of protein and peptides are reviewed and discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Legumes for Human Nutrition)
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Review
Lupins and Health Outcomes: A Systematic Literature Review
Nutrients 2022, 14(2), 327; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu14020327 - 13 Jan 2022
Viewed by 760
Abstract
Lupins have a unique nutrient profile among legumes and may have beneficial health effects when included in the diet. The aim of this systematic review was to investigate the effects of lupin on a range of health outcome measures. Databases included MEDLINE, Embase [...] Read more.
Lupins have a unique nutrient profile among legumes and may have beneficial health effects when included in the diet. The aim of this systematic review was to investigate the effects of lupin on a range of health outcome measures. Databases included MEDLINE, Embase and CINAHL, and focused on controlled intervention studies on healthy adults and those with chronic disease such as type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease and overweight. The Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses protocol was followed. Investigated intervention diets utilised whole lupin, lupin protein or lupin fibre, and outcomes were measured by markers of chronic disease, body weight and satiety. Quality assessment of results was performed using the Cochrane revised risk of bias tool. Overall, 21 studies with 998 participants were included: 12 using whole lupin, four used lupin protein and five lupin fibre. Beneficial changes were observed in 71% of studies that measured blood pressure, 83% measuring satiety and 64% measuring serum lipids. Unintended weight loss occurred in 25% of studies. Whole lupin demonstrated more consistent beneficial effects for satiety, glycaemic control and blood pressure than lupin protein or lupin fibre. Heterogeneity, low study numbers and a small participant base indicated further studies are required to strengthen current evidence particularly regarding the protein and dietary fibre components of lupin. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Legumes for Human Nutrition)
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