Special Issue "Applications of Nanomaterials in Diagnostics and Therapeutics"

A special issue of Nanomaterials (ISSN 2079-4991). This special issue belongs to the section "Biology and Medicines".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 28 February 2023 | Viewed by 3700

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Gabriele Ciasca
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Fondazione Policlinico Universitario Agostino Gemelli IRCCS, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Rome, Italy
Interests: biophysics; biomechanics; synchrotron radiation techniques; imaging and advanced microscopy; micro and nano devices
Dr. Svetlana Jovanović
E-Mail Website
Co-Guest Editor
“Vinča” Institute of Nuclear Sciences—National Institute of The Republic of Serbia, University of Belgrade, P.O. Box 522, 11000 Belgrade, Serbia
Interests: graphene; graphene quantum dots; photoluminescence
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Nanostructured materials and low-dimensional systems offer great opportunities in biomedicine thanks to their peculiar chemical and physical characteristics. The nanoscale features of these materials allow scientists to access enhanced optical, magnetic, electrical, mechanical, and thermal properties, which holding promise to revolutionize both diagnostic and therapeutic practice. Applications in these fields include, among others, quantum dots for in vivo imaging and hyperthermia; 0D, 1D, and 2D nanostructures for ultrasensitive biosensors; and 3D nanomaterials for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Moreover, thanks to the advances in bioprinting and biofabrication, these novel functionalities can be successfully integrated with biological components in lab-on-chip platforms, which will have a large impact on precision and personalized medicine. This Special Issue aims to collect relevant contributions in the field of nanostructured materials applied to biomedicine in diagnostics and therapeutics.

  • Research and review papers on the following topics are especially welcomed:
  • Plasmonic devices for biomolecular sensing.
  • Lab-on-chip devices for point-of-care clinical diagnostics. 
  • Nanotechnologies applied to extracellular vesicles detection, characterization, and production.
  • Nanomaterials for drug delivery. 

Dr. Gabriele Ciasca
Dr. Svetlana Jovanović
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nanomaterials is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • biosensors
  • bioimaging
  • plasmonics
  • lab-on-chip
  • bioprinting
  • drug delivery
  • regenerative medicine
  • hyperthermia
  • photodynamic therapy
  • nanoscale correlated disorder

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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Article
Iron(III)–Quercetin Complexes’ Safety for MRI Cell Tracking in Cell Therapy Applications: Cytotoxic and Genotoxic Assessment
Nanomaterials 2022, 12(16), 2776; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano12162776 - 13 Aug 2022
Viewed by 349
Abstract
The theranostic agent iron–quercetin complex (IronQ) provides a T1-positive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent. The magnetically IronQ-labeled cells can be used for cell tracking and have active biological applications in promoting cell and tissue regeneration. However, a detailed investigation of IronQ’s cytotoxicity [...] Read more.
The theranostic agent iron–quercetin complex (IronQ) provides a T1-positive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent. The magnetically IronQ-labeled cells can be used for cell tracking and have active biological applications in promoting cell and tissue regeneration. However, a detailed investigation of IronQ’s cytotoxicity and genotoxicity is necessary. Thus, this study aimed to evaluate the possibility of IronQ inducing cytotoxicity and genotoxicity in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). We evaluated the vitality of cells, the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), the level of antioxidant enzymes, and the stability of the genetic material in PBMCs treated with IronQ. The results show that IronQ had a negligible impact on toxicological parameters such as ROS production and lipid peroxidation, indicating that it is not harmful. IronQ-labeled PMBCs experienced an insignificant depletion of antioxidant enzyme levels at the highest concentration of IronQ. There is no evident genotoxicity in the magnetically IronQ-labeled PBMCs. The results show that IronQ does not potentiate the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity effects of the labeled PMBCs and might be safe for therapeutic and cell tracking purposes. These results could provide a reference guideline for the toxicological analysis of IronQ in in vivo studies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Applications of Nanomaterials in Diagnostics and Therapeutics)
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Article
Facile Synthesis of L-Cysteine Functionalized Graphene Quantum Dots as a Bioimaging and Photosensitive Agent
Nanomaterials 2021, 11(8), 1879; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano11081879 - 22 Jul 2021
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1259
Abstract
Nowadays, a larger number of aggressive and corrosive chemical reagents as well as toxic solvents are used to achieve structural modification and cleaning of the final products. These lead to the production of residual, waste chemicals, which are often reactive, cancerogenic, and toxic [...] Read more.
Nowadays, a larger number of aggressive and corrosive chemical reagents as well as toxic solvents are used to achieve structural modification and cleaning of the final products. These lead to the production of residual, waste chemicals, which are often reactive, cancerogenic, and toxic to the environment. This study shows a new approach to the modification of graphene quantum dots (GQDs) using gamma irradiation where the usage of reagents was avoided. We achieved the incorporation of S and N atoms in the GQD structure by selecting an aqueous solution of L-cysteine as an irradiation medium. GQDs were exposed to gamma-irradiation at doses of 25, 50 and 200 kGy. After irradiation, the optical, structural, and morphological properties, as well as the possibility of their use as an agent in bioimaging and photodynamic therapy, were studied. We measured an enhanced quantum yield of photoluminescence with the highest dose of 25 kGy (21.60%). Both S- and N-functional groups were detected in all gamma-irradiated GQDs: amino, amide, thiol, and thione. Spin trap electron paramagnetic resonance showed that GQDs irradiated with 25 kGy can generate singlet oxygen upon illumination. Bioimaging on HeLa cells showed the best visibility for cells treated with GQDs irradiated with 25 kGy, while cytotoxicity was not detected after treatment of HeLa cells with gamma-irradiated GQDs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Applications of Nanomaterials in Diagnostics and Therapeutics)
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Review

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Review
Recent Advances in the Label-Free Characterization of Exosomes for Cancer Liquid Biopsy: From Scattering and Spectroscopy to Nanoindentation and Nanodevices
Nanomaterials 2021, 11(6), 1476; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano11061476 - 02 Jun 2021
Cited by 12 | Viewed by 1970
Abstract
Exosomes (EXOs) are nano-sized vesicles secreted by most cell types. They are abundant in bio-fluids and harbor specific molecular constituents from their parental cells. Due to these characteristics, EXOs have a great potential in cancer diagnostics for liquid biopsy and personalized medicine. Despite [...] Read more.
Exosomes (EXOs) are nano-sized vesicles secreted by most cell types. They are abundant in bio-fluids and harbor specific molecular constituents from their parental cells. Due to these characteristics, EXOs have a great potential in cancer diagnostics for liquid biopsy and personalized medicine. Despite this unique potential, EXOs are not yet widely applied in clinical settings, with two main factors hindering their translational process in diagnostics. Firstly, conventional extraction methods are time-consuming, require large sample volumes and expensive equipment, and often do not provide high-purity samples. Secondly, characterization methods have some limitations, because they are often qualitative, need extensive labeling or complex sampling procedures that can induce artifacts. In this context, novel label-free approaches are rapidly emerging, and are holding potential to revolutionize EXO diagnostics. These methods include the use of nanodevices for EXO purification, and vibrational spectroscopies, scattering, and nanoindentation for characterization. In this progress report, we summarize recent key advances in label-free techniques for EXO purification and characterization. We point out that these methods contribute to reducing costs and processing times, provide complementary information compared to the conventional characterization techniques, and enhance flexibility, thus favoring the discovery of novel and unexplored EXO-based biomarkers. In this process, the impact of nanotechnology is systematically highlighted, showing how the effectiveness of these techniques can be enhanced using nanomaterials, such as plasmonic nanoparticles and nanostructured surfaces, which enable the exploitation of advanced physical phenomena occurring at the nanoscale level. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Applications of Nanomaterials in Diagnostics and Therapeutics)
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