Special Issue "Nanocatalysts in Chemistry: Synthesis and Applications"

A special issue of Nanomaterials (ISSN 2079-4991).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 29 February 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Erwann Guénin
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Sorbonne Universités, Université de Technologie de Compiègne, Compiègne, France
Interests: synthesis and functionalization of nanomaterials for catalysis and biomedical applications; green chemistry and processes: nanocatalyst, sensors, microwave technology and continuous flow

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

As the world is currently facing enormous problems concerning the climate, energy, and the environment, catalytic technologies appear to be becoming critical to energy, chemical process, and environmental industries. Recently, revitalization of the research on catalytic materials and industrial catalysts was observed with the development of nanotechnology. Indeed, the use of nanomaterials in catalysis and, more particularly, inorganic nanoparticles has attracted many research endeavors around the world in order to develop innovative and greener protocols. These nanoparticles can be utilized as the catalyst or as support and can facilitate the catalytic process in new media such as, for example, water. Moreover, owing to their small size and increased surface area, nanocatalysts have clearly emerged as offering a unique solution at the interface between homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysis, allowing for an increased reaction rate. In addition, nanoparticles provide additional catalytic functionalities due to their unique intrinsic properties (e.g., magnetism, photo-capability). Thus, in this quest for ecocompatible and less expensive catalysts, nanocatalysis is becoming an important field in chemistry, which is applied widely in academia and in industry.

This Special Issue deals with all aspects of nanocatalysis applied to chemistry, from nanocatalyst synthesis and characterization to their various applications in fine chemistry, depollution, energy, and so on. Both original research and comprehensive review papers contributing to the field are welcome.

Dr. Erwann Guénin
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nanomaterials is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • nanomaterials
  • nanoparticles
  • heterogeneous catalyst
  • green chemistry

Published Papers (6 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Open AccessArticle
Reusable Surface-Modified Bacterial Cellulose Based on Atom Transfer Radical Polymerization Technology with Excellent Catalytic Properties
Nanomaterials 2019, 9(10), 1443; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano9101443 - 11 Oct 2019
Abstract
The high catalytic activity of membrane-binding gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) makes its application in oxidation or reduction an attractive challenge. Herein, surface-functionalized bacterial cellulose (BC-poly(HEMA)) was successfully prepared with 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) as monomers via the atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) method. BC-poly(HEMA) was [...] Read more.
The high catalytic activity of membrane-binding gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) makes its application in oxidation or reduction an attractive challenge. Herein, surface-functionalized bacterial cellulose (BC-poly(HEMA)) was successfully prepared with 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) as monomers via the atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) method. BC-poly(HEMA) was further utilized as not only reducing agent but also carrier for uniform distribution of the AuNPs in the diameter of about 8 nm on the membrane surface during the synthesis stage. The synthesized AuNPs/BC-poly(HEMA) exhibited excellent catalytic activity and reusability for reducing 4-nitrophenol (4-NP) from NaBH4. The results proved that the catalytic performance of AuNPs/BC-poly(HEMA) was affected by the surrounding temperature and pH, and AuNPs/BC-poly(HEMA) maintained the extremely high catalytic activity of AuNPs/BC-poly(HEMA) even after 10 reuses. In addition, no 4-NP was detected in the degradation solution after being stored for 45 days. The reusable catalyst prepared by this work shows a potential industrial application prospect. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanocatalysts in Chemistry: Synthesis and Applications)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Open AccessArticle
Preparation of Pd/C by Atmospheric-Pressure Ethanol Cold Plasma and Its Preparation Mechanism
Nanomaterials 2019, 9(10), 1437; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano9101437 - 10 Oct 2019
Abstract
Treatment with atmospheric-pressure (AP) hydrogen cold plasma is an effective method for preparing highly active supported metal catalytic materials. However, this technique typically uses H2 as working gas, which is explosive and difficult to transport. This study proposes the use of PdCl [...] Read more.
Treatment with atmospheric-pressure (AP) hydrogen cold plasma is an effective method for preparing highly active supported metal catalytic materials. However, this technique typically uses H2 as working gas, which is explosive and difficult to transport. This study proposes the use of PdCl2 as a Pd precursor and activated carbon as the support to fabricate Pd/C catalytic materials (Pd/C-EP-Ar) by using ethanol—which is renewable, easily stored, and safe—combined with AP cold plasma (AP ethanol cold plasma) followed by calcination in Ar gas at 550 °C for 2 h. Both Pd/C-EP and Pd/C-HP fabricated using AP ethanol and hydrogen cold plasma (without calcination in Ar gas) respectively, exhibit low CO oxidation reactivity. The activity of Pd/C-EP is lower than Pd/C-HP, which is mainly ascribed to the carbon layer formed by ethanol decomposition during plasma treatment. However, the 100% CO conversion temperature (T100) of Pd/C-EP-Ar is 140 °C, which is similar to that of Pd/C-HP-Ar fabricated using AP hydrogen cold plasma (calcined in Ar gas at 550 °C for 2 h). The characterization results of X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy indicated that the carbon layer formed by ethanol decomposition enhanced the interaction of metal nanoparticles to the support, and a high Pd/C atomic ratio was obtained. This was beneficial to the high CO oxidation performance. This work provides a safe method for synthesizing high-performance Pd/C catalytic materials avoiding the use of H2, which is explosive and difficult to transport. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanocatalysts in Chemistry: Synthesis and Applications)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Short-Time Hydrothermal Synthesis of CuBi2O4 Nanocolumn Arrays for Efficient Visible-Light Photocatalysis
Nanomaterials 2019, 9(9), 1257; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano9091257 - 05 Sep 2019
Abstract
In this article, a short-time hydrothermal method is developed to prepare CuBi2O4 nanocolumn arrays. By using Bi(NO3)3·5H2O in acetic acid and Cu(NO3)2·3H2O in ethanol as precursor solutions, tetragonal [...] Read more.
In this article, a short-time hydrothermal method is developed to prepare CuBi2O4 nanocolumn arrays. By using Bi(NO3)3·5H2O in acetic acid and Cu(NO3)2·3H2O in ethanol as precursor solutions, tetragonal CuBi2O4 with good visible light absorption can be fabricated within 0.5 h at 120 °C. Tetragonal structured CuBi2O4 can be formed after 15 min hydrothermal treatment, however it possesses poor visible light absorption and low photocatalytic activity. Extending the hydrothermal treatment duration to 0.5 h results in a significant improvement invisible light absorption of the tetragonal CuBi2O4. The CuBi2O4 obtained through 0.5 h hydrothermal synthesis shows a band gap of 1.75 eV and exhibits the highest photocatalytic performance among the CuBi2O4 prepared with various hydrothermal time. The removal rate of methylene blue by the 0.5 h CuBi2O4 reaches 91% under visible light irradiation for 0.5 h. This study proposes a novel strategy to prepare photoactive CuBi2O4 nanocolumn arrays within 0.5 h at a moderate temperature of 120 °C. The hydrothermal method provides a facile strategy for the fast synthesis of metal-oxide-based photocatalysts at mild reaction conditions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanocatalysts in Chemistry: Synthesis and Applications)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Open AccessArticle
Facile Synthesis of Pd Nanocubes with Assistant of Iodide and Investigation of Their Electrocatalytic Performances Towards Formic Acid Oxidation
Nanomaterials 2019, 9(3), 375; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano9030375 - 05 Mar 2019
Abstract
This article presents a facile, one-pot method using the aqueous phase for the synthesis of high-quality Pd nanocubes. In this study, Pd chloride was used as the precursor, sodium iodide as capping agent, and poly(vinylpyrrolidone) as surfactant and reducing agent. The effects of [...] Read more.
This article presents a facile, one-pot method using the aqueous phase for the synthesis of high-quality Pd nanocubes. In this study, Pd chloride was used as the precursor, sodium iodide as capping agent, and poly(vinylpyrrolidone) as surfactant and reducing agent. The effects of different halogens on the morphology of Pd nanocrystals were investigated. The results showed that, in this synthesis system, the selection and proper amount of sodium iodide was essential to the preparation of high-quality Pd nanocubes. When iodide was replaced by other halogens (such as bromide and chloride), Pd nanocrystals with cubic morphology could not be obtained. In addition, we have found that NaBH4 can be used to efficiently remove inorganic covers, such as iodide, from the surface of Pd nanoparticles as synthesized. The Pd nanoparticles obtained were employed as electro-catalysts for formic acid oxidation, and they exhibited excellent catalytic activity and good stability towards this reaction. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanocatalysts in Chemistry: Synthesis and Applications)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
A Simple and Fast Method to Synthesize Cubic Iridium Nanoparticles with Clean Surface Free from Surfactants
Nanomaterials 2019, 9(1), 76; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano9010076 - 08 Jan 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
Cubic Iridium nanoparticles without any surfactants on the surface have been synthesized successfully in this work. The process of synthesis was quite simple by just injecting one drop of 400 µL solution containing Iridium precursor onto Cu foil (1 cm × 1 cm), [...] Read more.
Cubic Iridium nanoparticles without any surfactants on the surface have been synthesized successfully in this work. The process of synthesis was quite simple by just injecting one drop of 400 µL solution containing Iridium precursor onto Cu foil (1 cm × 1 cm), and through galvanic reaction between the Ir precursor and Cu foil, the cubic Iridium nanoparticle could be obtained quite quickly (<30 s). The Cu foil played the roles of both reducing agent and substrate. This method could also be employed to synthesize cubic nanoparticles of other Pt-group metals such as Rh. By employing this method, cubic metal nanoparticles with surfactant-free surfaces could be produced economically and efficiently, and as a result, a realistic relationship between structure and catalytic activity could be established. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanocatalysts in Chemistry: Synthesis and Applications)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Controllable Synthesis and Catalytic Performance of Gold Nanoparticles with Cucurbit[n]urils (n = 58)
Nanomaterials 2018, 8(12), 1015; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano8121015 - 06 Dec 2018
Cited by 1
Abstract
A series of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) was prepared in situ with different cucurbit[n]urils (CB[n]s) in an alkaline aqueous solution. The nanoparticle sizes can be well controlled by CB[n]s (n = 5, 6, 7, [...] Read more.
A series of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) was prepared in situ with different cucurbit[n]urils (CB[n]s) in an alkaline aqueous solution. The nanoparticle sizes can be well controlled by CB[n]s (n = 5, 6, 7, 8) with different ring sizes. The packing densities of CB[58] and free surface area on AuNPs were determined. A direct relationship was found between the ring size and packing density of CB[n]s with respect to the AuNP-catalyzed reduction of 4-nitrophenol in the presence of NaBH4. The larger particle size and higher surface coverage of bigger CB[n]-capped AuNPs significantly decreased the catalytic activity. Furthermore, this work could lead to new applications that utilize AuNPs under an overlayer of CB[n]s for catalysis, sensing, and drug delivery. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanocatalysts in Chemistry: Synthesis and Applications)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Type: Article
Title: Efficient visible-light photodegradation of pesticides via magnetic TiO2−x/rGO/Fe3O4 nanocomposite with persulfate activation
Authors: Wei Ai 1,, Dan Zhong 2,‡, Qian Lei 1, Lei Yang 1,*
Affiliations:
1 Key Laboratory of Northwest Water Resources, Environment and Ecology, Ministry of Education, School of Environmental and Municipal Engineering, Xi’an University of Architecture and Technology, Xi’an, Shaanxi Province, 710055, China
2 Zhuhai Da Hengqin Science and Technology Development Co., Ltd, Hengqin New Area, Zhuhai 519000, P. R. China
* Correspondence: [email protected]
‡ These authors contributed equally to this work.
Abstract: An environmental-friendly and magnetic titanium dioxide graphene nanocomposite (TiO2−x/rGO/Fe3O4) was prepared for efficiently photodegrading imidacloprid pesticides from wastewater under visible-light irradiation (λ>400 nm). Due to the oxygen vacancy introduced into the TiO2 lattice, the light absorption boundary of TiO2−x/rGO/Fe3O4 is significantly extended to the full visible spectrum. Moreover, the charge separation efficiency is considerably enhanced due to the photo-induced electron transfer from TiO2−x to rGO via the Ti-O-C bond. In order to further improve the removal efficiency of organic pesticides, persulfate (PS) was introduced into the reaction system. The good photocatalytic properties of TiO2−x/rGO/Fe3O4 nanocomposite can effectively activate PS to generate the sufficient amount of sulfate radicals and hydroxyl radicals as the active oxidizing species. This study provides a sustainable pathway for the efficient visible-light photodegradation of imidacloprid pesticides via TiO2−x/rGO/Fe3O4 nanocomposites featuring magnetic separation after wastewater treatment in practice.
Keywords: TiO2−x/rGO/Fe3O4; visible-light; photodegradation; pesticides; persulfate

Back to TopTop