Special Issue "Advances in Multifunctional Carbon-Based Nanocomposites: Synthesis, Characterization and Applications"

A special issue of Nanomaterials (ISSN 2079-4991).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 October 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Igor De Rosa
Website1 Website2
Guest Editor
1. UCLA Engineering Institute for Technology Advancement, Los Angeles, United States
2. Department of Materials Science and Engineering, UCLA, Los Angeles, United States
Interests: multifunctional nanomaterials and nanocomposites, advanced composite materials, metal nanocrystals, carbon nanotubes
Prof. Dr. Fabrizio Sarasini
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Chemical Engineering Materials Environment, Sapienza-Università di Roma and UdR INSTM, Via Eudossiana 18, 00184 Roma, Italy
Interests: natural fibers; impact damage; polymer matrix composites; fiber–matrix adhesion; mechanical behavior; bio-based polymers
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Wenbo Xin
Website
Co-Guest Editor
1. Department of Materials Science and Engineering, UCLA, Los Angeles, United States
2. UCLA Engineering Institute for Technology Advancement, Los Angeles, United States
Interests: carbon nanotubes; graphene; gold nanocrystals and nanostructures; SERS; microscopy and microanalysis

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Carbon nanostructures, including graphene and carbon nanotubes (CNT), have attracted significant research interest in the past few decades. These materials present outstanding mechanical, electrical, and thermal properties, as well as a large aspect ratio and high specific surface areas. This class of new-generation materials has shown revolutionary impacts not only in academic communities but in industrial fields as well. Multifunctional carbon-based nanocomposites for a diverse range of applications have been developed, including but not limited to aerospace, energy, electronics, electrochemistry, supercapacitors, and chemical and biosensors. A thorough understanding of carbon-based nanocomposites, including their synthesis, processing, in situ and ex situ characterizations, and applications, is always highly desirable.

This Special Issue aims to provide a comprehensive collection of the latest advances in the development of synthesis approaches, processing methods, characterizations, and current applications of carbon-based nanocomposites. Novel synthetic methods, new fundamental findings in science and technologies of carbon materials, and innovative techniques to characterize carbon nanostructures and interfaces are of high importance to this Special Issue. In addition, this Special Issue particularly seeks to explore the progress of carbon-based nanocomposites in terms of their multifunctionality and emphasizes high-quality work focusing on their emerging applications in the following diverse areas: chemical and biosensing, electrochemical performance, supercapacitors, catalysis and photocatalysis, hydrogen evolution reaction, and the reinforcement of mechanical and electrical properties. We welcome original research manuscripts related to multifunctional carbon-based nanocomposites to this Special Issue. Review manuscripts closely related to the above aspects are also welcome. Manuscripts exploring interactions between different components of carbon-based nanocomposites are of particular interest.

Below are some of the subtopics to be included in this Special Issue: synthesis and fabrication of CNT yarns, fibers, and sheets; synthesis of novel graphene- and CNT-based nanocomposites; mechanical and electrical properties of CNT assemblies and their composites; graphene- and CNT-templated growth of anisotropic metal nanocrystals; carbon-based nanocomposites for structural and electrochemical applications; carbon-based nanocomposites for chemical and biosensing; and fabrications and applications of graphene-based liquid cells for in-situ TEM.

Dr. Igor De Rosa
Prof. Fabrizio Sarasini
Dr. Wenbo Xin
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nanomaterials is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • nanocomposites
  • multifunctional materials
  • carbon nanotubes
  • graphene
  • synthesis
  • in situ and ex situ characterization
  • mechanical properties
  • electrical properties
  • photocatalytic properties
  • chemical and bio sensing
  • aerospace applications

Published Papers (3 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Open AccessArticle
Fabrication and Characterization of Solid Composite Yarns from Carbon Nanotubes and Poly(dicyclopentadiene)
Nanomaterials 2020, 10(4), 717; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano10040717 - 10 Apr 2020
Abstract
In this report, networks of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are transformed into composite yarns by infusion, mechanical consolidation and polymerization of dicyclopentadiene (DCPD). The microstructures of the CNT yarn and its composite are characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), high resolution transmission electron microscopy [...] Read more.
In this report, networks of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are transformed into composite yarns by infusion, mechanical consolidation and polymerization of dicyclopentadiene (DCPD). The microstructures of the CNT yarn and its composite are characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), and a focused ion beam used for cross-sectioning. Pristine yarns have tensile strength, modulus and elongation at failure of 0.8 GPa, 14 GPa and 14.0%, respectively. In the composite yarn, these values are significantly enhanced to 1.2 GPa, 68 GPa and 3.4%, respectively. Owing to the consolidation and alignment improvement, its electrical conductivity was increased from 1.0 × 105 S/m (raw yarn) to 5.0 × 105 S/m and 5.3 × 105 S/m for twisted yarn and composite yarn, respectively. The strengthening mechanism is attributed to the binding of the DCPD polymer, which acts as a capstan and increases frictional forces within the nanotube bundles, making it more difficult to pull them apart. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Porous Carbon Materials Obtained by the Hydrothermal Carbonization of Orange Juice
Nanomaterials 2020, 10(4), 655; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano10040655 - 01 Apr 2020
Abstract
Porous carbon materials are currently subjected to strong research efforts mainly due to their excellent performances in energy storage devices. A sustainable process to obtain them is hydrothermal carbonization (HTC), in which the decomposition of biomass precursors generates solid products called hydrochars, together [...] Read more.
Porous carbon materials are currently subjected to strong research efforts mainly due to their excellent performances in energy storage devices. A sustainable process to obtain them is hydrothermal carbonization (HTC), in which the decomposition of biomass precursors generates solid products called hydrochars, together with liquid and gaseous products. Hydrochars have a high C content and are rich with oxygen-containing functional groups, which is important for subsequent activation. Orange pomace and orange peels are considered wastes and then have been investigated as possible feedstocks for hydrochars production. On the contrary, orange juice was treated by HTC only to obtain carbon quantum dots. In the present study, pure orange juice was hydrothermally carbonized and the resulting hydrochar was filtered and washed, and graphitized/activated by KOH in nitrogen atmosphere at 800 °C. The resulting material was studied by transmission and scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and nitrogen sorption isotherms. We found porous microspheres with some degree of graphitization and high nitrogen content, a specific surface of 1725 m2/g, and a pore size distribution that make them good candidates for supercapacitor electrodes. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
A Facile Method of Preparing the Asymmetric Supercapacitor with Two Electrodes Assembled on a Sheet of Filter Paper
Nanomaterials 2019, 9(9), 1338; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano9091338 - 19 Sep 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
An asymmetric supercapacitor was prepared on a sheet of filter paper with two modified surfaces acting as electrodes in 1 M potassium hydroxide aqueous solution. By choosing carbon nanotubes and two different kinds of metal oxides (zinc oxide and ferro ferric oxide) as [...] Read more.
An asymmetric supercapacitor was prepared on a sheet of filter paper with two modified surfaces acting as electrodes in 1 M potassium hydroxide aqueous solution. By choosing carbon nanotubes and two different kinds of metal oxides (zinc oxide and ferro ferric oxide) as electrode materials, the asymmetric supercapacitor was successfully fabricated. The results showed that this device exhibited a wide potential window of 1.8 V and significantly improved electrochemical performances of its counterparts. Particularly, the one-sheet asymmetric supercapacitor demonstrated high energy density of 116.11 W h/kg and power density 27.48 kW/kg, which was attributed to the combined action and shortened distance between the two electrodes, respectively. Besides, it showed superior electrochemical cycling stability with 87.1% capacitance retention under room temperature. These outstanding results can not only give researchers new insights into compact energy storage systems, but they also provide a good prospect for flexible asymmetric supercapacitors. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop