Special Issue "Gold Nanoparticle-Based Biosensors"

A special issue of Nanomaterials (ISSN 2079-4991).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Magdalena Stobiecka
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Biophysics, Warsaw University of Life Sciences, Warsaw, Poland
Interests: nanobiosensors; nanoelectrochemistry; molecular beacon fluorescence genosensors; AuNP-enhanced immunosensors, resonance elastic light scattering (RELS) for gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) assembly; gated plasmonic effects in core-shell AuNPs; quartz crystal nanogravimetry; optical biosensors for cancer biomarkers; graphene oxide and functionalized gold nanoparticle nanocarriers for gene and drug delivery; mitochondria and exosome biosensors; surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS); fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Contemporary research on gold nanostructures has gained extraordinary attention from scientists around the world due to their novel and readily available unique optical and electronic properties enabling the development of new applications in many fields, spanning from catalysis to biosensors and nanocarrier-based controlled drug delivery, to energy conversion and storage devices, and other fields. Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) are involved in theranostic applications, cellular imaging, and photothermal therapy. They are also used in diagnostic assays and as the nanocarriers for drug, protein, and gene delivery. Gold nanostructures, which are currently extensively investigated, include AuNPs of different sizes and shapes, nanowires (AuNW), nanocages, and nanostars, as well as more complex structures such as gold-coated magnetic and semiconductor nanoparticles.

    This Special Issue of Nanomaterials devoted to biosensors based on gold nanoparticles and other gold nanostructures will offer a comprehensive selection of recent research works, short communications, and review articles focused on current state-of-the-art biosensor designs and novel applications of gold nanomaterials in preparation of biosensors, methods of their functionalization, as well as on the development of other AuNP-based sensing platforms, including but not limited to cellular imaging, drug/gene/protein loading and releasing, and surface plasmon resonance enhancement and quenching. The topics covered will also include the development of electrochemical, optical, and nanogravimetric biosensors. AuNP aggregation and hot-spot formation phenomena resulting in colorimetric and light scattering changes, as well as fluorescence energy transfer, associated with modulation of surface plasmon resonance, will also be included in the Special Issue. I warmly invite researchers involved in the broad areas of gold nanomaterials research to contribute original research papers or review articles to this Special Issue, presenting the current progress in this field. Both experimental and theoretical works will be considered for publication in this Issue.

Dr. Magdalena Stobiecka
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nanomaterials is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • gold nanoparticles
  • biomedical applications in diagnostics and therapy
  • surface functionalization
  • colorimetric biosensors
  • nanogravimetric biosensors
  • electrochemical biosensors
  • optical biosensors
  • surface plasmon
  • fluorescence quenching
  • surface plasmon resonance enhancement

Published Papers (2 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Open AccessArticle
Highly Sensitive and Selective Colorimetric Detection of Creatinine Based on Synergistic Effect of PEG/Hg2+–AuNPs
Nanomaterials 2019, 9(10), 1424; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano9101424 - 08 Oct 2019
Abstract
A colorimetric sensor, based on the synergistic coordination effect on a gold nanoparticle (AuNP) platform has been developed for the determination of creatinine. The sensor selects citrate stabilized AuNPs as a platform, polyethylene glycol (PEG) as a decorator, and Hg2+ as a [...] Read more.
A colorimetric sensor, based on the synergistic coordination effect on a gold nanoparticle (AuNP) platform has been developed for the determination of creatinine. The sensor selects citrate stabilized AuNPs as a platform, polyethylene glycol (PEG) as a decorator, and Hg2+ as a linkage to form a colorimetric probe system (PEG/Hg2−–AuNPs). By forming hydrogen bond between the oxygen-containing functional groups of PEG and citrate ions on the surface of AuNPs, this probe shows good stability. PEG coordinated with Hg2+ synergistically and specifically on the surface of dispersed AuNPs, and the existence of creatinine could induce the aggregation of AuNPs with a corresponding color change and an obvious absorption peak shift within 5 min. This PEG/Hg2+–AuNPs probe towards creatinine shows high sensitivity, and a good linear relationship (R2 = 0.9948) was obtained between A620522 nm and creatinine concentration, which can achieve the quantitative calculations of creatinine. The limit of detection (LOD) of this PEG/Hg2+–AuNPs probe was estimated to be 9.68 nM, lower than that of many other reported methods (Supplementary Materials Table S3). Importantly, the sensitive probe can be successfully applied in a urine simulating fluid sample and a bovine serum sample. The unique synergistic coordination sensing mechanism applied in the designation of this probe further improves its high selectivity and specificity for the detection of creatinine. Thus, the proposed probe may give new inspirations for colorimetric detection of creatinine and other biomolecules. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Gold Nanoparticle-Based Biosensors)
Open AccessArticle
Optical Detection of Denatured Ferritin Protein via Plasmonic Gold Nanoparticles Exposure through Aminosilane Solution
Nanomaterials 2019, 9(10), 1417; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano9101417 - 04 Oct 2019
Abstract
: The presence of denatured proteins within a therapeutic drug product can create a series of serious adverse effects, such as mild irritation, immunogenicity, anaphylaxis, or instant death to a patient. The detection of protein degradation is complicated and expensive due to current [...] Read more.
: The presence of denatured proteins within a therapeutic drug product can create a series of serious adverse effects, such as mild irritation, immunogenicity, anaphylaxis, or instant death to a patient. The detection of protein degradation is complicated and expensive due to current methods associated with expensive instrumentation, reagents, and processing time. We have demonstrated here a platform for visual biosensing of denatured proteins that is fast, low cost, sensitive, and user friendly by exploiting the plasmonic properties of noble metal nanoparticles. In this study we have exposed artificially heat stressed ferritin and gold nanoparticles to 3-aminopropyl triethoxysilane, which degrades the protein by showing a systematic blue shift in the absorbance spectra of the gold nanoparticle/ferritin and aminosilane solution. This blue shift in absorbance produces a detectable visual color transition from a blue color to a purple hue. By studying the Raman spectroscopy of the gold nanoparticle/ferritin and aminosilane solution, the extent of ferritin degradation was quantified. The degradation of ferritin was again confirmed using dynamic light scattering and was attributed to the aggregation of the ferritin due to accelerated heat stress. We have successfully demonstrated a proof of concept for visually detecting ferritin from horse spleen that has experienced various levels of degradation, including due to heat stress. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Gold Nanoparticle-Based Biosensors)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Back to TopTop