Special Issue "Antibacterial Activity of Nanoparticles"

A special issue of Nanomaterials (ISSN 2079-4991).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Nghia P. Truong
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Materials, ETH Zürich, HCI F531, Vladimir-Prelog-Weg 5, 8093 Zürich, Switzerland
Interests: polymer chemistry; nanomedicine; drug delivery; antimicrobial materials
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Vi-Khanh Truong
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Nanobiotechnology Lab, School of Science, RMIT University.124 La Trobe Street, Melbourne VIC 3000
Interests: cell-nanomaterial interactions, biomaterials, antibacterial nanomaterials, antifungal nanomaterials, implants
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Prof. Scott Rice
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
The Singapore Centre for Life Sciences Engineering and the School of Biological Sciences, College of Science, Nanyang Technological University. 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798
Interests: biofilm formation, biofilm control strategies, quorum sensing, interspecies interactions, microbial ecology

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We would like to invite you to submit high-quality work in the synthesis, characterization, and antibacterial mechanism study of novel antimicrobial nanoparticles to this Special Issue of Nanomaterials.

Despite our increasing understanding of its threat and causes, antibiotic resistance remains one of the biggest threats to global health. As a consequence of this rise in drug resistance, deaths associated with microbial infections are on the rise and are predicted to eclipse the mortality rates of cancer by 2050. Therefore, considerable efforts are urgently needed to develop better antibiotics/materials that can eradicate antibiotic-resistant bacteria.

Antibacterial nanoparticles represent one potential solution to antimicrobial resistance. These compounds not only kill antibiotic-resistant bacteria via different modes of action, but can also be used with existing clinically relevant antibiotics to help further overcome antimicrobial resistance mechanisms. As such, antibacterial nanomaterials are gaining increasing attention.

This Special Issue aims to highlight outstanding works and review articles that will advance the field of antibacterial nanomaterials. All manuscripts reporting the novel synthesis, characterization, and antibacterial mechanism of antimicrobial nanoparticles are welcome to submit to our Special Issue.

We look forward to receiving your high-quality manuscript.

Dr. Nghia P. Truong
Dr. Vi-Khanh Truong
Prof. Scott Rice
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nanomaterials is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • nanoparticles
  • antimicrobial nanomaterials
  • nanocomposites
  • coating
  • antibiotic-resistance
  • anti-biofilm
  • antibacterial mechanisms
  • multidrug resistance

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Synthesis and Antibacterial Properties of Novel ZnMn2O4–Chitosan Nanocomposites
Nanomaterials 2019, 9(11), 1589; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano9111589 - 09 Nov 2019
Abstract
The development of productive antibacterial agents from nontoxic materials via a simple methodology has been an immense research contribution in the medicinal chemistry field. Herein, a sol–gel one-pot reaction was used to synthesize hybrid composites of hausmannite–chitosan (Mn3O4–CS) and [...] Read more.
The development of productive antibacterial agents from nontoxic materials via a simple methodology has been an immense research contribution in the medicinal chemistry field. Herein, a sol–gel one-pot reaction was used to synthesize hybrid composites of hausmannite–chitosan (Mn3O4–CS) and its innovative derivative zinc manganese oxide–chitosan (ZnMn2O4–CS). Fixed amounts of CS with different metal matrix w/v ratios of 0.5%, 1.0%, 1.5%, and 2.0% for Mn and Zn precursors were used to synthesize ZnMn2O4–CS hybrid composites. X-ray diffraction analysis indicated the formation of polycrystalline tetragonal-structured ZnMn2O4 with a CS matrix in the hybrids. Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopic analysis confirmed the formation of ZnMn2O4–CS hybrids. Detailed investigations of the surface modifications were conducted using scanning electron microscopy; micrographs at different magnifications revealed that the composites’ surface changed depending on the ratio of the source materials used to synthesize the ZnMn2O4–CS hybrids. The antibacterial activity of the Mn3O4–CS and ZnMn2O4–CS composites was tested against various bacterial species, including Bacillus subtilis, Escherichia coli, Salmonella typhi, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The zone of inhibition and minimum inhibitory concentration values were deduced to demonstrate the efficacy of the ZnMn2O4–CS nanocomposites as antibacterial agents. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Antibacterial Activity of Nanoparticles)
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Open AccessArticle
CdSe QD Biosynthesis in Yeast Using Tryptone-Enriched Media and Their Conjugation with a Peptide Hecate for Bacterial Detection and Killing
Nanomaterials 2019, 9(10), 1463; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano9101463 - 16 Oct 2019
Abstract
The physical and chemical synthesis methods of quantum dots (QDs) are generally unfavorable for biological applications. To overcome this limitation, the development of a novel “green” route to produce highly-fluorescent CdSe QDs constitutes a promising substitute approach. In the present work, CdSe QDs [...] Read more.
The physical and chemical synthesis methods of quantum dots (QDs) are generally unfavorable for biological applications. To overcome this limitation, the development of a novel “green” route to produce highly-fluorescent CdSe QDs constitutes a promising substitute approach. In the present work, CdSe QDs were biosynthesized in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae using a novel method, where we showed for the first time that the concentration of tryptone highly affects the synthesis process. The optimum concentration of tryptone was found to be 25 g/L for the highest yield. Different methods were used to optimize the QD extraction from yeast, and the best method was found to be by denaturation at 80 °C along with an ultrasound needle. Multiple physical characterizations including transmission electron microscopy (TEM), dynamic light scattering (DLS), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), and spectrophotometry confirmed the optical features size and shape distribution of the QDs. We showed that the novel conjugate of the CdSe QDs and a cell-penetrating peptide (hecate) can detect bacterial cells very efficiently under a fluorescent microscope. The conjugate also showed strong antibacterial activity against vancomycin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (VRSA), methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), and Escherichia coli, which may help us to cope with the problem of rising antibiotic resistance. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Antibacterial Activity of Nanoparticles)
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Open AccessArticle
Bacterial Compatibility/Toxicity of Biogenic Silica (b-SiO2) Nanoparticles Synthesized from Biomass Rice Husk Ash
Nanomaterials 2019, 9(10), 1440; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano9101440 - 11 Oct 2019
Abstract
Biogenic silica (b-SiO2) nanopowders from rice husk ash (RHA) were prepared by chemical method and their bacterial compatibility/toxicity was analyzed. The X-ray diffractometry (XRD) patterns of the b-SiO2 nanopowders indicated an amorphous feature due to the absence of any sharp [...] Read more.
Biogenic silica (b-SiO2) nanopowders from rice husk ash (RHA) were prepared by chemical method and their bacterial compatibility/toxicity was analyzed. The X-ray diffractometry (XRD) patterns of the b-SiO2 nanopowders indicated an amorphous feature due to the absence of any sharp peaks. Micrographs of the b-SiO2 revealed that sticky RHA synthesized SiO2 nanopowder (S1) had clustered spherical nanoparticles (70 nm diameter), while b-SiO2 nanopowder synthesized from red RHA (S2) and b-SiO2 nanopowder synthesized from brown RHA (S3) were purely spherical (20 nm and 10 nm diameter, respectively). Compared to the S1 (11.36 m2g−1) and S2 (234.93 m2g−1) nanopowders, the S3 nanopowders showed the highest surface area (280.16 m2g−1) due to the small particle size and high porosity. The core level of the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) spectra showed that Si was constituted by two components, Si 2p (102.2 eV) and Si 2s (153.8 eV), while Oxygen 1s was observed at 531.8 eV, confirming the formation of SiO2. The anti-bacterial activity of the b-SiO2 nanopowders was investigated using both gram-positive (Escherichia coli) and gram-negative (Staphylococcus aureus) microorganisms. Compared to S2 and S3 silica nanopowders, S1 demonstrated enhanced antibacterial activity. This study signifies the medical, biomedical, clinical, and biological importance and application of RHA-mediated synthesized b-SiO2. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Antibacterial Activity of Nanoparticles)
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