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Special Issue "Surface Chemistry"

A special issue of Molecules (ISSN 1420-3049).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2013).

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Maija M. Kuklja
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742, USA and International Science and Engineering, Office of International and Integrative Activities, National Science Foundation, Arlington, VA, 22230, USA
Interests: modeling of the structure and properties of materials; defects, non-equilibrium and ultra-fast processes; extreme conditions; catalysis; surface science; development of theoretical and computational methods; ab initio and multi-scale simulations; chemical reactions triggered by defects and deformations

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This special issue of Molecules: Surface Chemistry is devoted to outstanding research and review papers focused on fundamental experimental and theoretical studies in the physics and chemistry of surfaces and interfaces. It covers topics contributing to a better understanding of basic phenomena occurring on surfaces and interfaces, especially those involving physical and chemical properties of polar surfaces of complex and functional materials. Research papers and reviews dealing with mechanisms of adsorption, desorption, stability and degradation of polar surfaces, photo-induced chemical reactions, defects, mass- and charge-transport on surfaces and interfaces are welcome for this Special Issue of Molecules. Authors of review papers are kindly requested to make a pre-submission inquiry with a brief outline to the guest editor.

Dr. Maija M. Kuklja
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Molecules is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.


Keywords

  • polar surfaces and interfaces
  • adsorption and desorption
  • materials stability and decomposition
  • degradation mechanisms
  • photo-induced chemical reactions
  • defects and deformations
  • mass- and charge-transport

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Desorption of Water from Distinct Step Types on a Curved Silver Crystal
Molecules 2014, 19(8), 10845-10862; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules190810845 - 25 Jul 2014
Cited by 11
Abstract
We have investigated the adsorption of H2O onto the A and B type steps on an Ag single crystal by temperature programmed desorption. For this study, we have used a curved crystal exposing a continuous range of surface structures ranging from [...] Read more.
We have investigated the adsorption of H2O onto the A and B type steps on an Ag single crystal by temperature programmed desorption. For this study, we have used a curved crystal exposing a continuous range of surface structures ranging from [5(111) × (100)] via (111) to [5(111) × (110)]. LEED and STM studies verify that the curvature of our sample results predominantly from monoatomic steps. The sample thus provides a continuous array of step densities for both step types. Desorption probed by spatially-resolved TPD of multilayers of H2O shows no dependence on the exact substrate structure and thus confirms the absence of thermal gradients during temperature ramps. In the submonolayer regime, we observe a small and linear dependence of the desorption temperature on the A and B step density. We argue that such small differences are only observable by means of a single curved crystal, which thus establishes new experimental benchmarks for theoretical calculation of chemically accurate binding energies. We propose an origin of the observed behavior based on a “two state” desorption model. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Surface Chemistry)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Superhydrophobic Surfaces Developed by Mimicking Hierarchical Surface Morphology of Lotus Leaf
Molecules 2014, 19(4), 4256-4283; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules19044256 - 04 Apr 2014
Cited by 125
Abstract
The lotus plant is recognized as a ‘King plant’ among all the natural water repellent plants due to its excellent non-wettability. The superhydrophobic surfaces exhibiting the famous ‘Lotus Effect’, along with extremely high water contact angle (>150°) and low [...] Read more.
The lotus plant is recognized as a ‘King plant’ among all the natural water repellent plants due to its excellent non-wettability. The superhydrophobic surfaces exhibiting the famous ‘Lotus Effect’, along with extremely high water contact angle (>150°) and low sliding angle (<10°), have been broadly investigated and extensively applied on variety of substrates for potential self-cleaning and anti-corrosive applications. Since 1997, especially after the exploration of the surface micro/nanostructure and chemical composition of the lotus leaves by the two German botanists Barthlott and Neinhuis, many kinds of superhydrophobic surfaces mimicking the lotus leaf-like structure have been widely reported in the literature. This review article briefly describes the different wetting properties of the natural superhydrophobic lotus leaves and also provides a comprehensive state-of-the-art discussion on the extensive research carried out in the field of artificial superhydrophobic surfaces which are developed by mimicking the lotus leaf-like dual scale micro/nanostructure. This review article could be beneficial for both novice researchers in this area as well as the scientists who are currently working on non-wettable, superhydrophobic surfaces. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Surface Chemistry)
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Other

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Open AccessConcept Paper
Topography of Photochemical Initiation in Molecular Materials
Molecules 2013, 18(11), 14148-14160; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules181114148 - 15 Nov 2013
Cited by 19
Abstract
We propose a fluctuation model of the photochemical initiation of an explosive chain reaction in energetic materials. In accordance with the developed model, density fluctuations of photo-excited molecules serve as reaction nucleation sites due to the stochastic character of interactions between photons and [...] Read more.
We propose a fluctuation model of the photochemical initiation of an explosive chain reaction in energetic materials. In accordance with the developed model, density fluctuations of photo-excited molecules serve as reaction nucleation sites due to the stochastic character of interactions between photons and energetic molecules. A further development of the reaction is determined by a competition of two processes. The first process is growth in size of the isolated reaction cell, leading to a micro-explosion and release of the material from the cell towards the sample surface. The second process is the overlap of reaction cells due to an increase in their size, leading to the formation of a continuous reaction zone and culminating in a macro-explosion, i.e., explosion of the entire area, covering a large part of the volume of the sample. Within the proposed analytical model, we derived expressions of the explosion probability and the duration of the induction period as a function of the initiation energy (exposure). An experimental verification of the model was performed by exploring the initiation of pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN) with the first harmonic of YAG: Nd laser excitation (1,064 nm, 10 ns), which has confirmed the adequacy of the model. This validation allowed us to make a few quantitative assessments and predictions. For example, there must be a few dozen optically excited molecules produced by the initial fluctuations for the explosive decomposition reaction to occur and the life-time of an isolated cell before the micro-explosion must be of the order of microseconds. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Surface Chemistry)
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