molecules-logo

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

Special Issue "Advances in Radical Chemistry"

A special issue of Molecules (ISSN 1420-3049). This special issue belongs to the section "Organic Chemistry".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 June 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. John C. Walton
Website
Guest Editor
EaStCHEM School of Chemistry, University of St. Andrews, St. Andrews, Fife, KY16 9ST, UK
Interests: radical chemistry; organic synthetic methods; free-radical rearrangements; photoredox catalysis; oxime derivatives; EPR spectroscopy; DFT applications; enhanced acidity of radicals
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Exploring chemical space is an intellectually creative exercise that, at the same time, may reveal substances with properties beneficial to society. Chemical space is exceedingly vast but is populated with ‘islands’ of molecules having one of more joint properties that define them and set them apart. An especially active and fertile enclave is the free radical island. Because of their reactive nature, the chemical terrain there is exceptionally dynamic and subject to transformation and change. A Special Issue of Molecules is being produced to keep abreast of these rapid and important movements and their implications in the chemical, material, polymer and biological sciences. To fulfil this aim, research communications, papers and reviews in all areas of free-radical chemistry are welcomed for inclusion. The issue will contain articles on free-radical and radical ion related aspects of synthetic and preparative chemistry, polymer chemistry, materials science, biological science and computational chemistry. Structural, mechanistic, kinetic and spectroscopic advances will also be covered.

Prof. Dr. John C. Walton
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Molecules is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Free radicals
  • Radical ions
  • Synthetic methods
  • Photoredox catalysis
  • Organic mechanisms

Related Special Issues

Published Papers (2 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

Open AccessArticle
Aryliodonium Ylides as Novel and Efficient Additives for Radical Chemistry: Example in Camphorquinone (CQ)/Amine Based Photoinitiating Systems
Molecules 2019, 24(16), 2913; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules24162913 - 11 Aug 2019
Cited by 4
Abstract
Diaryliodonium salts are well-established compounds in free radical chemistry and are already used as photoinitiators (free radical or cationic polymerization), but the presence of counter anions is a strong drawback. Indeed, a counter anion is always required (e.g., SbF6) leading [...] Read more.
Diaryliodonium salts are well-established compounds in free radical chemistry and are already used as photoinitiators (free radical or cationic polymerization), but the presence of counter anions is a strong drawback. Indeed, a counter anion is always required (e.g., SbF6) leading to potential toxicity issues or release of HF. In the present paper, counter anion-free and fluoride-free aryliodonium salts are proposed, that is, aryliodonium ylides (AY) are studied here as new and efficient additives for radical chemistry and an example is provided for the camphorquinone (CQ)/amine based photoinitiating systems (PISs) for the polymerization of thick (1.4 mm) and thin (20–13 µm) methacrylates under air and blue light irradiation. The newly proposed PISs, for example, CQ/amine/AY, presented excellent polymerization performances and good bleaching properties were obtained after polymerization. Real-time Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (RT-FTIR) was used to monitor the photopolymerization profiles. The chemical mechanisms involved were investigated using electron spin resonance (ESR). Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Radical Chemistry)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Review

Jump to: Research

Open AccessReview
Free Radical Mediated Oxidative Degradation of Carotenes and Xanthophylls
Molecules 2020, 25(5), 1038; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules25051038 - 26 Feb 2020
Abstract
This article reviews the excited-state quenching, pro-vitamin A activity and anticarcinogenicity of carotenes and xanthophylls in relation to their chemical structures. Excited-state quenching improved with the length of the conjugated chain structure. Pro-vitamin A activity was dependent on the presence of at least [...] Read more.
This article reviews the excited-state quenching, pro-vitamin A activity and anticarcinogenicity of carotenes and xanthophylls in relation to their chemical structures. Excited-state quenching improved with the length of the conjugated chain structure. Pro-vitamin A activity was dependent on the presence of at least one beta-ionyl ring structure. The effectiveness of carotenoids as antioxidants depended on their ability to trap peroxyl radicals with production of resonance-stabilized carotenyl radicals. The products identified from oxidations of carotenes and xanthophylls with molecular oxygen and other oxidizing agents are presented. The free radical-mediated mechanisms that have been proposed to account for the different classes of products are reviewed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Radical Chemistry)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Back to TopTop