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Special Issue "Novel Formulations and Pharmaceutical Materials to Improve Therapeutic Outcomes for Patients. A Themed Issue Dedicated to Professor Ryan F. Donnelly"

A special issue of Molecules (ISSN 1420-3049). This special issue belongs to the section "Medicinal Chemistry".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 April 2021).

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Eneko Larrañeta Landa
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Pharmacy, Queen’s University Belfast, Belfast BT9 7BL, UK
Interests: 3D printing; polymeric drug delivery systems; medical nanotechnology; transdermal drug delivery systems; microneedles; medical devices; implantable devices
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Aaron J. Courtenay
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Ulster University, Cromore Road, Londonderry, BT521SA, UK
Interests: clinical pharmaceutics; polymeric formulation; diagnostics; drug delivery; vaccination

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Prof. Ryan Donnelly is a Chair in Pharmaceutical Technology at the School of Pharmacy Queen’s University Belfast. His research is centered on design and physicochemical characterization of advanced polymeric drug delivery systems for transdermal and topical drug delivery, with a strong emphasis on improving therapeutic outcomes for patients. His work has covered a wide range of areas, such as medical/pharmaceutical materials, transdermal drug delivery, drug monitoring or photodynamic therapy, among others. Currently, Professor Donnelly's research is focused on novel polymeric microneedle arrays for transdermal administration of “difficult-to-deliver” drugs and intradermal delivery of vaccines and photosensitizers. He has authored over 600 peer-reviewed publications, including several granted patents, 5 textbooks, and approximately 160 full papers. He has been an invited speaker at numerous national and international conferences. Professor Donnelly is a Visiting Scientist at the Norwegian Institute for Cancer Research, where he is an Associate Member of the Radiation Biology Group. His work has attracted numerous awards, including the Controlled Release Society Young Investigator Award in 2016, BBSRC Innovator of the Year in 2013, the GSK Emerging Scientist Award in 2012, and the Royal Pharmaceutical Society Science Award in 2011. His contributions to the field are not only based on his actual research, as he teaches pharmaceutical technology and extemporaneous formulation to Pharmacy students. During his career, he has made a considerable and sustained contribution to the pharmaceutical sciences field, and accordingly, Molecules is highly pleased to host a Special Issue honoring Prof. Donnelly due to his outstanding achievements to develop new formulations to improve patient therapeutic outcomes.

Dr. Eneko Larrañeta
Dr. Aaron J. Courtenay
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Molecules is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Pharmaceutics
  • Drug delivery
  • Vaccine delivery
  • Formulation
  • Photodynamic therapy
  • Transdermal drug delivery
  • Intradermal drug delivery
  • Microneedles
  • Patient monitoring
  • Diagnostics

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Article
Preparation, Characterization, and In Vivo Evaluation of Amorphous Icaritin Nanoparticles Prepared by a Reactive Precipitation Technique
Molecules 2021, 26(10), 2913; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules26102913 - 14 May 2021
Viewed by 341
Abstract
Icaritin is a promising anti-hepatoma drug that is currently being tested in a phase-III clinical trial. A novel combination of amorphization and nanonization was used to enhance the oral bioavailability of icaritin. Amorphous icaritin nanoparticles (AINs) were prepared by a reactive precipitation technique [...] Read more.
Icaritin is a promising anti-hepatoma drug that is currently being tested in a phase-III clinical trial. A novel combination of amorphization and nanonization was used to enhance the oral bioavailability of icaritin. Amorphous icaritin nanoparticles (AINs) were prepared by a reactive precipitation technique (RPT). Fourier transform infrared spectrometry was used to investigate the mechanism underlying the formation of amorphous nanoparticles. AINs were characterized via scanning electron microscopy, X-ray powder diffraction, and differential scanning calorimetry. Our prepared AINs were also evaluated for their dissolution rates in vitro and oral bioavailability. The resultant nanosized AINs (64 nm) were amorphous and exhibited a higher dissolution rate than that derived from a previous oil-suspension formulation. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) revealed that the C=O groups from the hydrophilic chain of polymers and the OH groups from icaritin formed hydrogen bonds that inhibited AIN crystallization and aggregation. Furthermore, an oral administration assay in beagle dogs showed that Cmax and AUClast of the dried AINs formulation were 3.3-fold and 4.5-fold higher than those of the oil-suspension preparation (p < 0.01), respectively. Our results demonstrate that the preparation of amorphous drug nanoparticles via our RPT may be a promising technique for improving the oral bioavailability of poorly water-soluble drugs. Full article
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Article
Investigation of the Physical, Chemical and Microbiological Stability of Losartan Potassium 5 mg/mL Extemporaneous Oral Liquid Suspension
Molecules 2021, 26(2), 301; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules26020301 - 08 Jan 2021
Viewed by 666
Abstract
Extemporaneous oral liquid preparations are commonly used when there is no commercially available dosage form for adjustable dosing. In most cases, there is a lack of stability data to allow for an accurately assigned shelf life and storage conditions to give greater confidence [...] Read more.
Extemporaneous oral liquid preparations are commonly used when there is no commercially available dosage form for adjustable dosing. In most cases, there is a lack of stability data to allow for an accurately assigned shelf life and storage conditions to give greater confidence of product safety and efficacy over its shelf life. The aim of this study was to evaluate the physical, chemical and microbiological stability of an extemporaneous oral liquid suspension of losartan potassium, 5 mg/mL, used to treat paediatric hypertension in Our Lady’s Children’s Hospital Crumlin, Ireland. The losartan content of extemporaneous oral suspensions, prepared with and without addition of water, was measured by UV and confirmed by HPLC analysis. Suspensions were stored at 4 °C and room temperature (RT) and were monitored for changes in; pH, colour, odour, re-dispersibility, Total Aerobic Microbial Count, Total Yeast and Mould Count and absence of E. coli. Results showed that suspensions prepared by both methods, stored at 4 °C and RT, were physically and microbiologically stable over 28 days. Initial losartan content of all suspensions was lower than expected at 80–81% and did not change significantly over the 28 days. HPLC and NMR did not detect degradation of losartan in the samples. Suspensions prepared in water showed 100% losartan content. The reduced initial losartan content was confirmed by HPLC and was related to the acidic pH of the suspension vehicle. Physiochemical properties of the drug are important factors for consideration in the selection of suspension vehicle for extemporaneous compounding of oral suspensions as they can influence the quality, homogeneity and efficacy of these preparations. Full article
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Article
A Drug Content, Stability Analysis, and Qualitative Assessment of Pharmacists’ Opinions of Two Exemplar Extemporaneous Formulations
Molecules 2020, 25(13), 3078; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules25133078 - 06 Jul 2020
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 820
Abstract
Despite a decline in the number of active pharmaceutical ingredients prepared extemporaneously using proprietary products, there remains a need for such products in the community (for example, liquid medicines for paediatrics which may be otherwise commercially unavailable). A lack of experience and quality [...] Read more.
Despite a decline in the number of active pharmaceutical ingredients prepared extemporaneously using proprietary products, there remains a need for such products in the community (for example, liquid medicines for paediatrics which may be otherwise commercially unavailable). A lack of experience and quality assurance systems may have diminished pharmacist’s confidence in the extemporaneous preparation process; therefore, pharmacists were asked to prepare two proprietary products, omeprazole and amlodipine. The resulting products were characterised in terms of variability in drug quantity, stability, particle size and antimicrobial properties. Furthermore, a self-administered questionnaire was used to assess 10 pharmacists’ opinions on the perceived complexity of the extemporaneous compounding process and their overall confidence in the final extemporaneously compounded products. Drug content studies revealed that 88.5% and 98.0% of the desired drug content was obtained for omeprazole and amlodipine, respectively. Antimicrobial properties were maintained for both drugs, however variability in particle size, particularly for amlodipine, was evident between formulations. While pharmacists who partook in the study had some or high confidence in the final products, they reported difficulty formulating the suspensions. Findings from this study provide insight into pharmacists’ views on two extemporaneously prepared products and highlight the variability obtained in preparations prepared by different pharmacists. Full article
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