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Special Issue "Food and Drug Analysis"

A special issue of Molecules (ISSN 1420-3049). This special issue belongs to the section "Natural Products Chemistry".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 April 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Ping-Chung Kuo Website E-Mail
School of Pharmacy, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan
Interests: natural products chemistry; structure–activity relationship studies; NMR and LC-MS/MS analysis; bioactivities for natural products

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue wishes to provide an intellectual platform for scientists to publish review, original research, short communication, etc., covering the topics of bioactive constituents, biological activities, and analytical methodologies in relation to food, drugs, and herbal medicines, as well as related disciplines of topical interest to public health.

Food and drug analysis includes the aspects of exploring natural sources as healthy food, characterizing the molecular structures of bioactive principles, identifying novel drugs, assessing their affinity and specificity, and examining their bioactivities in vitro and in vivo. In addition to extensively applied chromatographic methods, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is also used in screening for novel bioactive molecules. Various new sample preparation methods have also been reported, especially for analysis in biological sample matrices, including LLE, SPE, and SPME. All these new analytical methods accelerate research and can make the potential targets available in the near future.

Prof. Ping-Chung Kuo
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Molecules is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Bioactive constituent
  • Biological activity
  • Analytical methodology
  • Sample preparation method
  • Healthy food
  • Drug and herbal medicine

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Characterizing Tyrosinase Modulators from the Roots of Angelica keiskei Using Tyrosinase Inhibition Assay and UPLC-MS/MS as the Combinatorial Novel Approach
Molecules 2019, 24(18), 3297; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules24183297 - 10 Sep 2019
Abstract
In this study, an in vitro tyrosinase inhibition assay in combination with ultra performance liquid chromatography-orbitrap mass spectrometry (UPLC-orbitrap-MS) was developed for the rapid screening and identification of tyrosinase modulators from roots of Angelica keiskei. Of the 15 candidates considered, nine chalcones, [...] Read more.
In this study, an in vitro tyrosinase inhibition assay in combination with ultra performance liquid chromatography-orbitrap mass spectrometry (UPLC-orbitrap-MS) was developed for the rapid screening and identification of tyrosinase modulators from roots of Angelica keiskei. Of the 15 candidates considered, nine chalcones, xanthoangelols (1), B (2), D (3), E (4), G (5), H (6), 4-hydroxyderricin (7), xanthokeismin B (8) and (2E)-1-[4-hydroxy-2-(2-hydroxy-2-propanyl)-2,3-dihydro-1-benzofuran-7-yl]-3-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-2-propen-1-one (9), five coumarins, umbelliferone (10), selinidin (11), isopimpinellin (12), phellopterin (13) and xanthyletin (14), and one other compound, ashitabaol A (15), were distinguished between the test samples and the controls with statistical significance, and the structure of each compound was determined by comparing with in-house standards and the literature. Among these, six compounds, xanthoangelol (1), xanthoangelol D (3), xanthoangelol H (6), 4-hydroxyderricin (7), laserpitin (16) and isolaserpitin (17), were isolated from roots of A. keiskei. Of the compounds isolated, compounds 1, 7 and 16 were subjected to tyrosinase inhibitory assay, and the IC50 values were 15.87 ± 1.21, 60.14 ± 2.29 and >100 μM, respectively. The present study indicated that the combination of in vitro tyrosinase inhibition assay coupled with UPLC-MS/MS could be widely applied to the rapid screening of active substances from various natural resources. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Food and Drug Analysis)
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Open AccessArticle
Intake of Molecular Hydrogen in Drinking Water Increases Membrane Transporters, p-Glycoprotein, and Multidrug Resistance-Associated Protein 2 without Affecting Xenobiotic-Metabolizing Enzymes in Rat Liver
Molecules 2019, 24(14), 2627; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules24142627 - 19 Jul 2019
Abstract
Molecular hydrogen (H2) has been shown to have antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities that may reduce the development and progression of many diseases. In this study, hydrogen-rich water (HRW) was obtained by reacting hybrid magnesium–carbon hydrogen storage materials with water. Then, the [...] Read more.
Molecular hydrogen (H2) has been shown to have antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities that may reduce the development and progression of many diseases. In this study, hydrogen-rich water (HRW) was obtained by reacting hybrid magnesium–carbon hydrogen storage materials with water. Then, the effects of intake of HRW on the activities of xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes, membrane transporters, and oxidative stress in rats were investigated. Rats were given HRW ad libitum for four weeks. The results showed that intake of HRW had no significant effect on the activities of various cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes (CYP1A1, 1A2, 2B, 2C, 2D, 2E1, 3A, and 4A), glutathione-S-transferase, and Uridine 5′-diphospho (UDP)-glucuronosyltransferase. Except for a mild lower plasma glucose concentration, intake of HRW had no effect on other plasma biochemical parameters in rats. p-Glycoprotein and multidrug resistance-associated protein (Mrp) 2 protein expressions in liver were elevated after intake of HRW. However, HRW had no significant effects on glutathione, glutathione peroxidase, or lipid peroxidation in liver. The results from this study suggest that consumption of HRW may not affect xenobiotic metabolism or oxidative stress in liver. However, intake of HRW may increase the efflux of xenobiotics or toxic substances from the liver into bile by enhancing p-glycoprotein and Mrp2 protein expressions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Food and Drug Analysis)
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Open AccessArticle
Screening of the Active Component Promoting Leydig Cell Proliferation from Lepidium meyenii Using HPLC-ESI-MS/MS Coupled with Multivariate Statistical Analysis
Molecules 2019, 24(11), 2101; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules24112101 - 03 Jun 2019
Abstract
Lepidium meyenii is now widely consumed as a functional food and medicinal product, which is known as an enhancer of reproductive health. However, the specific chemical composition and mechanism of action for improving sexual function are unclear. The present study aims at screening [...] Read more.
Lepidium meyenii is now widely consumed as a functional food and medicinal product, which is known as an enhancer of reproductive health. However, the specific chemical composition and mechanism of action for improving sexual function are unclear. The present study aims at screening and determining the potential compounds, which promote mouse leydig cells (TM3) proliferation. The partial least squares analysis (PLS) was employed to reveal the correlation between common peaks of high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) fingerprint of L. meyenii and the proliferation activity of TM3. The results suggested that three compounds had good activities on the proliferation of TM3 and promoting testosterone secretion, there were N-benzyl-hexadecanamide, N-benzyl-(9z,12z)-octadecadienamide and N-benzyl-(9z,12z,15z)-octadecatrienamide which might be the potential bioactive markers related to the enhancing sexual ability functions of L. meyenii. The first step in testosterone synthesis is the transport of cholesterol into the mitochondria, and the homeostasis of mitochondrial function is related to cyclophilin D (CypD). In order to expound how bioactive ingredients lead to promoting testosterone secretion, a molecular docking simulation was used for further illustration in the active sites and binding degree of the ligands on CypD. The results indicated there was a positive correlation between the binding energy absolute value and testosterone secretion activity. In addition, in this study it also provided the reference for a simple, quick method to screen the promoting leydig cell proliferation active components in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM). Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Food and Drug Analysis)
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Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

planned paper 1: by Dr Feng Zhao and Dr. Mingjie Chen

Running title: Dynamic phenolic component changes were key for aging white tea

Quantification of water extractable substances and selected phenolic compounds combined with nontargeted metabolomics analysis uncovered key dynamic chemical changes of aging white tea

Abstract: It is a wide belief in Chinese folk medicine that longer storage time could enhance health-proactive activities of white tea. However, the storage-induced compositional changes remain elusive. In this study, 10 white tea samples, which were stored for 1-, 2-, 3-, 4-, 5-, 6-, 7-, 10-, 11- and 13- years, respectively, were selected. Water extractable substances and phenolic related macro components were quantified firstly. We found that total polyphenols gradually decreased, meanwhile total flavonoids, thearubigins (TRs) and theabrownines (TBs) were increased. Nontargeted metabolomics analysis was then conducted on selected subset of samples including 1-, 7- and 13- years of storage. The results further demonstrated that certain flavonols and glycosylated flavonols with reported health-proactive activities, were increased with the progression of storage. Our results suggested that dynamic phenolic components changes were key for aging white tea.

Key words: White tea; Aging; Polyphenol; Flavonoids; Flavonols and glycosylated flavonols; Theaflavins; Thearubigins; Theabrownins 

 

Planned paper 2: by Prof. Geng-Ruei Chang

Sulfonamides and organophosphorus insecticide residues in aquatic fishes in Taiwan through liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry

Abstract

The presence of sulfonamides and organophosphorus insecticide residues in majorly aquatic fishes in Taiwan and their effect on public health constitute a matter of concern for consumers worldwide. Antibiotic and insecticide residues can have adverse effects on both humans and animals, especially very rapid growth of aquaculture in recent decades. In this study, we applied a validated method to analyze chemical drug residues in fishes, including the levels of 12 sulfonamides and 18 insecticides residues in Taiwan. We collected 51 samples of tilapia, milk fish, or perch from Taiwanese aquafarms and production areas from June 2018 to July 2019. We detected 0.02–0.03 mg/kg of sulfamethazine in one tilapia and one milk fish; 0.02–0.05 mg/kg of chlorpyrifos in one tilapia, one milk fish and one perch, indicating that 3.92% and 5.88% of the samples contained sulfonamides and insecticide residues, respectively. We evaluated the health risk by deriving the estimated daily intake (EDI). The sulfonamides and organophosphorus insecticide residue EDI was below 1.0% of the acceptable daily intake recommended by the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization and World Health Organization. The risk was thus discovered to be negligible, indicating no immediate health risk associated with fish consumption. The present findings can serve as a reference regarding food safety and in monitoring of the veterinary drug residues present in aquatic organisms. Continual monitoring of residues in fish is critical for further assessment of possible effects on human health.

Keywords: sulfonamide; organophosphorus insecticide; residue; fish; risk assessment

 

Planned paper 3 (Review): By Prof. Adele Papetti

Advances in the analysis of veterinary drug residues in food matrices by Capillary Electrophoresis techniques.

Abstract: In the last years, European Commission adopted restrictive directives on food quality and safety in order to protect animal and human health. Veterinary drugs represent an important risk and the need to have sensitive and fast analytical techniques became mandatory. Over the years, the availability of different modes, interfaces and formats improved versatility, sensitivity and speed of Capillary Electrophoresis (CE) techniques. In particular, CE represents a powerful tool for the analysis of a large variety of food matrices and food-related molecules with important applications in food quality and safety. This review focuses the attention on recent CE-applications to detect different classes of drugs, both used as additives in animal food and contaminants of different food products, with a potential risk for animal and human health. In addition, also different sample preparation procedures, included advanced sample pre-concentration techniques, which allows sensitive CE analysis even in complex matrices, will be discussed.

Keywords Food quality, food safety, veterinary drugs, animal food, food contaminants, capillary electrophoresis, pre-concentration

 

Planned paper 4: By Dr. Carmen Chitescu

High Resolution UHPLC-MS Profiling of Phenolic Compounds in Alfalfa Sprouts

 Abstract: The consumption of sprouts has been growing, once they are a natural healthy food and considered as a valuable dietary supplement, rich in health-promoting phytochemicals. Alfalfa (Medicago sativa) contains different classes of secondary metabolites, showing biological activities, which are not yet fully characterized.

Modern extraction methods, such as: ultrasound-assisted extraction and microwave-assisted extraction was compared to classic tincture prepared according EU Ph. Changes in the bioactive compounds composition was monitored during germination over 5 days.

A non-target data independent acquisition approach was applied for performing simultaneous quantification/identification and profiling of phenolic compounds from alfalfa sprouts using UHPLC-Q Exactive hybrid quadrupole orbitrap high-resolution mass spectrometry.

Thirty-one compounds including phenolic acids, falvonone, isoflavone and flavone, were monitored based on comparison of retention time and high-resolution accurate mass with that of available reference standards and their chemical structures. The fragmentation patterns of the standards were investigated to further confirmation of the possible derivatives structure. For non-target screening and unknown compounds characterisation, data analysis was performed with Compound DiscovererTM software using one single workflow.

Total phenolic content and antioxidant capacities were also evaluated.

 

 

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