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Special Issue "Applied Analytical Chemistry"

A special issue of Molecules (ISSN 1420-3049). This special issue belongs to the section "Materials Chemistry".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (20 September 2021).

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Petr Bednar
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Dept Analyt Chem, Reg Ctr Adv Technol & Mat, Fac Sci, Palacky Univ, 17 Listopadu 12, 77146 Olomouc, Czech Republic
Interests: analytical chemistry; liquid chromatography; hyphenation of separation techniques (LC, CE) with mass spectrometry; natural compounds analysis; study of metabolism; analysis of archaeological samples; chiral separation; desorption/ionization mass spectrometry; ion mobility mass spectrometry; study of equilibrium reactions using retention and migration data

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Analytical Chemistry as scientific field is a good example of the connection of fundamental research in chemical, physical and biological branches to demands of practice. Mutual stimulation of fundamental and applied research makes Analytical Chemistry a dynamically developing area. The current high level of mechanical engineering and microelectronics accelerates the advancement of instrumental analytical techniques. Approaches to analytical data processing are being improved under the dictation of their increasing volume and with the possibilities of explosively developing informatics. Optimization and validation of analytical procedures are sped-up and automated. However, sophisticated instrumentation, although supported by Artificial Intelligence, is not self-saving. Experiences and thorough knowledge of possibilities and risks throughout the whole analytical procedure from the design of the experiment, to the sampling, sample treatment, and analysis and data processing remain essential for successful research. The integration of the entire analytical process and its transfer into practice is the subject of Applied Analytical Chemistry.

This Special Issue aims to cover recent progress and trends in Applied Analytical Chemistry. Papers focused on novel sampling and sample treatment procedures, the utilization of up-to-date techniques and methods in analytical practice are welcome. Moreover, progressive approaches in design of experiment and data processing proven in real situations fit within the focus of this Special Issue. Emphasis should be placed on the integrity of the whole analytical process. This Special Issue is open to all types of analytical techniques and their (synergistic) combinations applied especially but not only in the following areas:

  • food production
  • forensic practice and archaeology
  • environmental monitoring
  • clinical practice
  • quality control in industry


Dr. Petr Bednar
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Molecules is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Article
First Evidence of “Earth Wax” Inside the Casting Molds from the Roman Era
Molecules 2021, 26(14), 4259; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules26144259 - 13 Jul 2021
Viewed by 738
Abstract
This research was focused on the analysis of material composition and organic residues present in three molds found in the Moravian region (Czech Republic) belonging to the Roman era. X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy pointed out the possible remelting of Roman objects in Barbarian territory. [...] Read more.
This research was focused on the analysis of material composition and organic residues present in three molds found in the Moravian region (Czech Republic) belonging to the Roman era. X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy pointed out the possible remelting of Roman objects in Barbarian territory. The analysis of organic residues retrieved from the internal part of mold #2 by pyrolysis-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry proved the presence of ozokerite wax (“earth wax”). Consequent analysis of this organic residue by Atmospheric Solids Analysis Probe–ion mobility spectrometry–high-resolution mass spectrometry (ASAP-IMS-HRMS) confirmed the presence of ceresin, the main component of ozokerite. Ceresin was also detected in a sample of the organic residue from mold #1. Note that this is the first application of ASAP-IMS-HRMS in archaeological research. The remains of earth wax in molds suggest the production of wax models as an intermediate stage for the production of lost-wax ceramic casting molds. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Applied Analytical Chemistry)
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Article
What about Dinner? Chemical and Microresidue Analysis Reveals the Function of Late Neolithic Ceramic Pans
Molecules 2021, 26(11), 3391; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules26113391 - 03 Jun 2021
Viewed by 974
Abstract
The Late Neolithic palafitte site, Ustie na Drim, in the northern part of Lake Ohrid (North Macedonia), excavated in 1962, offered ceramic fragments of large, flat, elongated pans. These artifacts could be dated by relative chronology to roughly around 5200–5000 BC. According to [...] Read more.
The Late Neolithic palafitte site, Ustie na Drim, in the northern part of Lake Ohrid (North Macedonia), excavated in 1962, offered ceramic fragments of large, flat, elongated pans. These artifacts could be dated by relative chronology to roughly around 5200–5000 BC. According to their shape and technological traits, the ceramic pans were probably used for baking. The attached materials on the surface of studied pan fragments were sampled for consequent chemical and microscopical analyses (i.e., analyses of starch, phytoliths, and microscopic animal remains). An immunological method revealed the presence of pork proteins in samples. The presence of organic residues of animal origin was, moreover, confirmed by the detection of cholesterol using gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry. Analysis of detected microscopic botanical objects revealed starch grains of several plants (i.e., oak, cattail, and grasses). An interesting find was the hair of a beetle larva, which could be interpreted contextually as the khapra beetle, a pest of grain and flour. Based on our data, we suppose that the ceramic pans from Ustie na Drim were used for the preparation of meals containing meat from common livestock in combination with cereals and wild plants. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Applied Analytical Chemistry)
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Article
Study of Tetrahydroxylated Anthraquinones—Potential Tool to Assess Degradation of Anthocyanins Rich Food
Molecules 2021, 26(1), 2; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules26010002 - 22 Dec 2020
Viewed by 566
Abstract
Degradation of anthocyanins involves scission of the flavonoid skeleton yielding 2,4,6-trihydroxybenzaldehyde (phloroglucinaldehyde, PGA) and a phenolic acid. However, the process is not finished with the formation of PGA, as the consequent condensation of two PGA molecules providing colored hydroxylated anthraquinones was observed for [...] Read more.
Degradation of anthocyanins involves scission of the flavonoid skeleton yielding 2,4,6-trihydroxybenzaldehyde (phloroglucinaldehyde, PGA) and a phenolic acid. However, the process is not finished with the formation of PGA, as the consequent condensation of two PGA molecules providing colored hydroxylated anthraquinones was observed for the first time. This process was studied using a combination of preparative column chromatography, nuclear magnetic resonance, liquid chromatography/high resolution tandem mass spectrometry (LC/HRMS2), and quantum calculations using density functional theory. 1,3,5,7-tetrahydroxyanthraquinone (anthrachrysone) and its isomers were found to rise during heating (95 °C) in a buffered PGA model solution (phosphate buffer, pH 7). These compounds were detected in heated red wine after an increase of its pH value. The concentration of the identified anthrachrysone in the red wine reached 0.01 mg·L−1. Presence of those compounds could therefore indicate involvement of certain steps in the processing of plant materials rich in anthocyanins (e.g., utilization of a higher temperature and/or reduction of acidity) or long-term transformation of anthocyanins (potentially, for instance, in archaeological findings such as wine or fruit residues). Additionally, measurement of wine–soil suspensions proved an increase of their pH to the values suitable for anthocyanin cleavage (neutral to slightly alkaline; reached using soil from archaeologically well-known Bull Rock Cave). Although not found in artificially prepared samples (imitations) or authentic materials so far, according to our results the above mentioned conditions are suitable for the formation of tetrahydroxylated anthraquinone derivatives and their monitoring would be beneficial. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Applied Analytical Chemistry)
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