Special Issue "Wolbachia and Other Selfish Symbionts of Arthropods"

A special issue of Microorganisms (ISSN 2076-2607).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 November 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Daisuke Kageyama
Website
Guest Editor
Institute of Agrobiological Sciences, National Agriculture and Food Research Organization, Owashi, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, Japan
Interests: insect ecology; insect; butterflies; Lepidoptera; Drosophila; bacteria; real-time PCR; molecular cloning; PCR; evolution; invertebrates; endosymbiosis; sex determination; Wolbachia

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Arthropods are often subjected to various intracellular symbionts that are maternally transmitted and selfishly manipulate host reproduction. Wolbachia are most common among such symbionts and exert various phenotypes such as cytoplasmic incompatibility, parthenogenesis induction, male killing, feminization and others. Using the Drosophila model system, molecular mechanisms underlying some of these phenotypes have begun to be explored. However, little is known about the diverse phenotypes exerted by Wolbachia or other symbionts in different systems.

The aim of this Special Issue is to give a platform for researchers working on Wolbachia and phenotypically similar symbionts of arthropods, such as Cardinium, Spiroplasma, Rickettsia, Arsenophonus, etc., to exchange information and updates, potentially leading to the integrated understanding of symbiont-induced host reproductive manipulations.

For this purpose, we cordially invite you to submit research articles, review articles, and short communications related to the various aspects of Wolbachia and similar symbionts: symbiont diversity, symbiont phylogenetics, discoveries of new phenotypes, mechanism of host manipulations, symbiont–host/symbiont–symbiont interactions, genomics of symbionts, microbial ecology, effects on host ecology and evolution, and application to pest management.

Dr. Daisuke Kageyama
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Microorganisms is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Wolbachia
  • Reproductive manipulation
  • Arthropods
  • Intracellular symbionts
  • Endosymbionts
  • Pest management
  • Horizontal transfer
  • Phylogenetics

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessCommunication
Evidence for Common Horizontal Transmission of Wolbachia among Ants and Ant Crickets: Kleptoparasitism Added to the List
Microorganisms 2020, 8(6), 805; https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms8060805 - 27 May 2020
Abstract
While Wolbachia, an intracellular bacterial symbiont, is primarily transmitted maternally in arthropods, horizontal transmission between species has been commonly documented. We examined kleptoparasitism as a potential mechanism for Wolbachia horizontal transmission, using ant crickets and their host ants as the model system. [...] Read more.
While Wolbachia, an intracellular bacterial symbiont, is primarily transmitted maternally in arthropods, horizontal transmission between species has been commonly documented. We examined kleptoparasitism as a potential mechanism for Wolbachia horizontal transmission, using ant crickets and their host ants as the model system. We compared prevalence and diversity of Wolbachia across multiple ant cricket species with different degrees of host specificity/integration level. Our analyses revealed at least three cases of inter-ordinal Wolbachia transfer among ant and ant crickets, and also showed that ant cricket species with high host-integration and host-specificity tend to harbor a higher Wolbachia prevalence and diversity than other types of ant crickets. This study provides empirical evidence that distribution of Wolbachia across ant crickets is largely attributable to horizontal transmission, but also elucidates the role of intimate ecological association in successful Wolbachia horizontal transmission. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Wolbachia and Other Selfish Symbionts of Arthropods)
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Open AccessArticle
An Intranuclear Sodalis-Like Symbiont and Spiroplasma Coinfect the Carrot Psyllid, Bactericera trigonica (Hemiptera, Psylloidea)
Microorganisms 2020, 8(5), 692; https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms8050692 - 08 May 2020
Abstract
Endosymbionts harbored inside insects play critical roles in the biology of their insect host and can influence the transmission of pathogens by insect vectors. Bactericera trigonica infests umbelliferous plants and transmits the bacterial plant pathogen Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum (CLso), causing carrot yellows disease. [...] Read more.
Endosymbionts harbored inside insects play critical roles in the biology of their insect host and can influence the transmission of pathogens by insect vectors. Bactericera trigonica infests umbelliferous plants and transmits the bacterial plant pathogen Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum (CLso), causing carrot yellows disease. To characterize the bacterial diversity of B. trigonica, as a first step, we used PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analyses of 16S rDNA to identify Sodalis and Spiroplasma endosymbionts. The prevalence of both symbionts in field-collected psyllid populations was determined: Sodalis was detected in 100% of field populations, while Spiroplasma was present in 82.5% of individuals. Phylogenetic analysis using 16S rDNA revealed that Sodalis infecting B. trigonica was more closely related to symbionts infecting weevils, stink bugs and tsetse flies than to those from psyllid species. Using fluorescent in situ hybridization and immunostaining, Sodalis was found to be localized inside the nuclei of the midgut cells and bacteriocytes. Spiroplasma was restricted to the cytoplasm of the midgut cells. We further show that a recently reported Bactericera trigonica densovirus (BtDNV), a densovirus infecting B. trigonica was detected in 100% of psyllids and has reduced titers inside CLso-infected psyllids by more than two-fold compared to CLso uninfected psyllids. The findings of this study will help to increase our understanding of psyllid–endosymbiont interactions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Wolbachia and Other Selfish Symbionts of Arthropods)
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