Special Issue "Bioremediation - The Natural Solution"

A special issue of Microorganisms (ISSN 2076-2607). This special issue belongs to the section "Environmental Microbiology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 1 July 2019

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Harry Eccles

School of Physical Sciences and Computing, University of Central Lancashire, Preston, PR1 2HE, UK
Website | E-Mail
Interests: nuclear waste management; nuclear reprocessing; radionuclide diffusion; biosorption; ion exchange processes; solvent extraction; composite materials
Guest Editor
Dr. Sandeep Kadam

School of Engineering, University of Central Lancashire, Preston, PR1 2HE, UK
E-Mail
Interests: microbial degradation of concrete; nuclear waste management; microbial accelerated radionuclide diffusion; environmental bio-monitoring

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Bioremediation, as a treatment for municipal sewage wastes, is more than a century old (activated sludge process (ASP) was invented in 1914), with the first full scale continuous-flow activated sludge process in operation by 1916. By the 1930s, ASP had become the accepted technology for treating sewage waste, but the potential of microorganisms for waste treatment remained largely invisible to the public, possibly, until the EXXON Valdez oil spill incident nearly 30 years ago. This one incident aroused the public, politicians, scientists, etc., attention to the potential of microscopic organisms.

Thus, for this Special Issue, how should we define Bioremediation? Cleaning up oil spills relies largely on biodegradation of organic molecules; the removal of metals in the activated sludge process may be regarded as bioprecipitation/biosorption/bioaccumulattion; within the nuclear industry it is probably referred to as biodecontamination. We should probably not worry too much about the definition, but gather, in this Special Issue, all of these processes encompassing the success stories and the potential future applications of biotreatments as a valuable source of information that will be frequently referenced and consulted in future years.  

For this Special Issue of Microorganisms, we invite you to send contributions encompassing any aspects relating to the application of microorganisms for the treatment of contaminated soil, water and gaseous effluents/wastes.

Prof. Harry Eccles
Dr. Sandeep Kadam
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Microorganisms is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • biodegradation
  • bioprecipitation
  • biosorption
  • bioaccumulation
  • biodecontamination
  • organic and/or metal contamination
  • soil
  • water and gaseous contaminated systems

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Environmental Aspects of the Use of Hedera helix Extract in Bioremediation Process
Microorganisms 2019, 7(2), 43; https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms7020043
Received: 30 December 2018 / Revised: 25 January 2019 / Accepted: 2 February 2019 / Published: 5 February 2019
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Abstract
This paper analyzes the impact of saponins from English ivy leaves on the properties of environmental bacterial strains and hydrocarbon degradation ability. For this purpose, two bacterial strains, Raoultella ornitinolytica M03 and Acinetobacter calcoaceticus M1B, have been used in toluene, 4-chlorotoluene, and α,α,α-trifluorotoluene [...] Read more.
This paper analyzes the impact of saponins from English ivy leaves on the properties of environmental bacterial strains and hydrocarbon degradation ability. For this purpose, two bacterial strains, Raoultella ornitinolytica M03 and Acinetobacter calcoaceticus M1B, have been used in toluene, 4-chlorotoluene, and α,α,α-trifluorotoluene biodegradation supported by Hedera helix extract. Moreover, theeffects of ivy exposition on cell properties and extract toxicity were investigated. The extract was found to cause minor differences in cell surface hydrophobicity, membrane permeability, and Zeta potential, although it adhered to the cell surface. Acinetobacter calcoaceticus M1B was more affected by the ivy extract; thus, the cells were more metabolically active and degraded saponins at greater amounts. Although the extract influenced positively the cells’ viability in the presence of hydrocarbons, it could have been used by the bacteria as a carbon source, thus slowing down hydrocarbon degradation. These results show that the use of ivy saponins for hydrocarbon remediation is environmentally acceptable but should be carefully analyzed to assess the efficiency of the selected saponins-rich extract in combination with selected bacterial strains. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bioremediation - The Natural Solution)
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