Special Issue "Marine-Derived Exopolysaccharides to Mimic Glycosaminoglycans"

A special issue of Microorganisms (ISSN 2076-2607). This special issue belongs to the section "Environmental Microbiology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 June 2017)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Dr. Sylvia Colliec-Jouault

Ifremer, Laboratoire Ecosystèmes Microbiens et Molécules Marines pour les Biotechnologies EM3B, 44311 Nantes, France
Website | E-Mail
Interests: isolation of marine polysaccharides from a diverse marine biomass (algae, microalgae, bacteria, etc), design of “Glycosaminoglycan-mimetics”, development of biotechnological and pharmaceutical products
Guest Editor
Dr. Agata Zykwinska

Ifremer, Laboratoire Ecosystèmes Microbiens et Molécules Marines pour les Biotechnologies EM3B, 44311 Nantes, France
Website | E-Mail
Interests: structural characterization of polysaccharides, chemical and enzymatic modification of polysaccharides, physico-chemistry

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In the biotechnological challenge for the discovery of original biomolecules, microorganisms from marine ecosystems are a highly valuable bio-resource. In particular, microbial polysaccharides offer a source of safe, biocompatible, biodegradable and valuable renewable products with specific biological functions emphasized by a significant structural diversity. Acidic and/or sulfated heteropolysaccharides found in various organisms have diverse biological functions in the tissues from which they originate, especially in the cellular physiology. The therapeutic potential of natural polysaccharides such as glycosaminoglycans or GAGs is now well documented. Marine-derived polysaccharides and their oligosaccharidic derivatives have been described for a variety of biological activities such as antithrombotic, antitumor, antiviral, antioxidant, immunomodulatory effects. Marine microorganisms can offer a large variety of GAG-like molecules that could be a good alternative to the use of both mammalian GAGs and other traditional marine polysaccharides and could allow the development of a new generation of therapeutics. Marine microbial polysaccharides or exopolysaccharides (EPS) present original structural features that can be modified to design derivatives with targeted properties and improve their specificity. In this Special Issue of Microorganisms, we invite you to send contributions concerning any aspect related with the search and/or production of bioactive derivatives from marine EPS including microbial marine biodiversity, structures of the produced polysaccharides, some molecular aspects of their biosynthesis, as well as some of their applications driven by their features, optimization of their production, and biological properties with a focus on the discovery of novel fine chemicals and biopharmaceuticals.

Dr. Sylvia Colliec-Jouault
Dr. Agata Zykwinska
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Microorganisms is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • microorganisms
  • bacteria
  • archaea
  • cyanobacteria
  • microscopic fungi
  • microscopic algae
  • marine biodiversity
  • marine prokaryotes
  • polysaccharides
  • exopolysaccharides
  • anionic polysaccharides
  • sulfated polysaccharides
  • marine-derived polysaccharides
  • heparin-like entities
  • heparinoids
  • glycosaminoglycan-like molecules
  • glycosaminoglycan-mimetics
  • structure
  • modification
  • depolymerization
  • sulfation
  • biosynthesis
  • biological activity
  • glycobiology
  • biotechnology

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle Bioprospecting for Exopolysaccharides from Deep-Sea Hydrothermal Vent Bacteria: Relationship between Bacterial Diversity and Chemical Diversity
Microorganisms 2017, 5(3), 63; https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms5030063
Received: 13 July 2017 / Revised: 6 September 2017 / Accepted: 18 September 2017 / Published: 20 September 2017
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (1595 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Many bacteria biosynthesize structurally diverse exopolysaccharides (EPS) and excrete them into their surrounding environment. The EPS functional features have found many applications in industries such as cosmetics and pharmaceutics. In particular, some EPS produced by marine bacteria are composed of uronic acids, neutral [...] Read more.
Many bacteria biosynthesize structurally diverse exopolysaccharides (EPS) and excrete them into their surrounding environment. The EPS functional features have found many applications in industries such as cosmetics and pharmaceutics. In particular, some EPS produced by marine bacteria are composed of uronic acids, neutral sugars, and N-acetylhexosamines, and may also bear some functional sulfate groups. This suggests that they can share common structural features with glycosaminoglycans (GAG) like the two EPS (HE800 and GY785) originating from the deep sea. In an attempt to discover new EPS that may be promising candidates as GAG-mimetics, fifty-one marine bacterial strains originating from deep-sea hydrothermal vents were screened. The analysis of the EPS chemical structure in relation to bacterial species showed that Vibrio, Alteromonas, and Pseudoalteromonas strains were the main producers. Moreover, they produced EPS with distinct structural features, which might be useful for targeting marine bacteria that could possibly produce structurally GAG-mimetic EPS. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Marine-Derived Exopolysaccharides to Mimic Glycosaminoglycans)
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Review

Jump to: Research

Open AccessReview The Sea as a Rich Source of Structurally Unique Glycosaminoglycans and Mimetics
Microorganisms 2017, 5(3), 51; https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms5030051
Received: 13 July 2017 / Revised: 14 August 2017 / Accepted: 22 August 2017 / Published: 28 August 2017
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (5689 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) are sulfated glycans capable of regulating various biological and medical functions. Heparin, heparan sulfate, chondroitin sulfate, dermatan sulfate, keratan sulfate and hyaluronan are the principal classes of GAGs found in animals. Although GAGs are all composed of disaccharide repeating building blocks, [...] Read more.
Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) are sulfated glycans capable of regulating various biological and medical functions. Heparin, heparan sulfate, chondroitin sulfate, dermatan sulfate, keratan sulfate and hyaluronan are the principal classes of GAGs found in animals. Although GAGs are all composed of disaccharide repeating building blocks, the sulfation patterns and the composing alternating monosaccharides vary among classes. Interestingly, GAGs from marine organisms can present structures clearly distinct from terrestrial animals even considering the same class of GAG. The holothurian fucosylated chondroitin sulfate, the dermatan sulfates with distinct sulfation patterns extracted from ascidian species, the sulfated glucuronic acid-containing heparan sulfate isolated from the gastropode Nodipecten nodosum, and the hybrid heparin/heparan sulfate molecule obtained from the shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei are some typical examples. Besides being a rich source of structurally unique GAGs, the sea is also a wealthy environment of GAG-resembling sulfated glycans. Examples of these mimetics are the sulfated fucans and sulfated galactans found in brown, red and green algae, sea urchins and sea cucumbers. For adequate visualization, representations of all discussed molecules are given in both Haworth projections and 3D models. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Marine-Derived Exopolysaccharides to Mimic Glycosaminoglycans)
Figures

Graphical abstract

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