Topical Collection "Feature Papers in Gut Microbiota"

A topical collection in Microorganisms (ISSN 2076-2607). This collection belongs to the section "Gut Microbiota".

Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Martin Von Bergen

Department of Molecular Systems Biology, Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research—UFZ, Permoserstr. 15, 04318 Leipzig, Germany
Website | E-Mail
Fax: +49 (0)341 235 1786
Interests: microbial ecology; biodegradation of pollutants; metaproteomics; microbial physiology

Topical Collection Information

Dear Colleagues,

As follows from the title, this Topical Collection “Feature Papers in Gut Microbiota” aims to collect high quality research articles, short communications, and review articles in all the fields of Gut Microbiota.

For the selected works of this section on Gut Microbiota, we will focus on research questions that address the microbial ecology in the community, the functionalities of members of the microbiota, the metabolic and immunological interaction with the host and the role of the microbiota in human diseases.

Topics include, but are not limited to:

  • Structure and function of the microbiota
  • Microbial community genetics, transcriptomics, proteomics and metabolomics
  • Interaction within the microbiota
  • Metabolic interaction with the host
  • Inflammatory diseases
  • Interaction with the immune system
  • Microbial biodegradation of nutrients and xenobiotics
  • Microbial ecology
  • Microbial functions in the different habitats within the gut
  • Metabolic flux analysis
  • Analysis of functionalities by stable isotope probing (DNA, RNA and protein)
  • Model systems for studying microbiome biology
  • Novel technologies for the analysis of structure and function of the microbiota

Prof. Dr. Martin von Bergen
Collection Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the collection website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Microorganisms is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (1 paper)

2019

Open AccessReview
Probiotics and Prebiotics for the Amelioration of Type 1 Diabetes: Present and Future Perspectives
Microorganisms 2019, 7(3), 67; https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms7030067
Received: 10 January 2019 / Revised: 19 February 2019 / Accepted: 25 February 2019 / Published: 2 March 2019
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (2405 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Type 1-diabetes (T1D) is an autoimmune disease characterized by immune-mediated destruction of pancreatic beta (β)-cells. Genetic and environmental interactions play an important role in immune system malfunction by priming an aggressive adaptive immune response against β-cells. The microbes inhabiting the human intestine closely [...] Read more.
Type 1-diabetes (T1D) is an autoimmune disease characterized by immune-mediated destruction of pancreatic beta (β)-cells. Genetic and environmental interactions play an important role in immune system malfunction by priming an aggressive adaptive immune response against β-cells. The microbes inhabiting the human intestine closely interact with the enteric mucosal immune system. Gut microbiota colonization and immune system maturation occur in parallel during early years of life; hence, perturbations in the gut microbiota can impair the functions of immune cells and vice-versa. Abnormal gut microbiota perturbations (dysbiosis) are often detected in T1D subjects, particularly those diagnosed as multiple-autoantibody-positive as a result of an aggressive and adverse immunoresponse. The pathogenesis of T1D involves activation of self-reactive T-cells, resulting in the destruction of β-cells by CD8+ T-lymphocytes. It is also becoming clear that gut microbes interact closely with T-cells. The amelioration of gut dysbiosis using specific probiotics and prebiotics has been found to be associated with decline in the autoimmune response (with diminished inflammation) and gut integrity (through increased expression of tight-junction proteins in the intestinal epithelium). This review discusses the potential interactions between gut microbiota and immune mechanisms that are involved in the progression of T1D and contemplates the potential effects and prospects of gut microbiota modulators, including probiotic and prebiotic interventions, in the amelioration of T1D pathology, in both human and animal models. Full article
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