Special Issue "Biocontrol of Food Borne Pathogens"

A special issue of Microorganisms (ISSN 2076-2607). This special issue belongs to the section "Food Microbiology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 September 2019

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Gianluigi Mauriello

Division of Microbiology, Department of Agricultural Sciences, University of Naples Federico II, Via Università, 100, 80055 Portici (Napoli), Italy
Website | E-Mail
Interests: antimicrobials; lactic acid bacteria; meat quality and safety; food microbiology

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Prof. Lothar Leistner firstly used the term Hurdle Technology in 1995, and he said that it is used to identify a gentle but effective strategy for the preservation of foods. This means that the application of more hurdles at a low level, to control microbial growth during food processing, could better preserve sensorial and nutritional features of foods, compared to the application of few hurdles at a high level. The biopreservation of foods is a fascinating approach to food safety, and the biocontrol systems of food-borne pathogens, have to be considered new hurdles. Indeed, they affect food characteristics little and, remarkably, are harmless to human health. Therefore, research on the use of bacteria and/or their metabolites, bacteriophages, herb metabolites, and all bio-based food-borne pathogen control systems, are welcome in this Special Issue. Due to the high number of manuscripts in the current literature describing “in vitro” experiments, particular attention will be given to manuscripts describing use of potential biocontrol agents in real food systems, both at the laboratory or industrial scales.

Prof. Gianluigi Mauriello
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

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Keywords

  • biocontrol
  • biopreservation
  • food borne pathogens
  • food safty
  • food quality

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle Lysis Profiles of Salmonella Phages on Salmonella Isolates from Various Sources and Efficiency of a Phage Cocktail against S. Enteritidis and S. Typhimurium
Microorganisms 2019, 7(4), 100; https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms7040100
Received: 27 February 2019 / Revised: 1 April 2019 / Accepted: 1 April 2019 / Published: 5 April 2019
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Abstract
Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium are major foodborne pathogens of concern worldwide. Bacteriophage applications have gained more interest for biocontrol in foods. This study isolated 36 Salmonella phages from several animal farms in Thailand and tested them on 47 [...] Read more.
Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium are major foodborne pathogens of concern worldwide. Bacteriophage applications have gained more interest for biocontrol in foods. This study isolated 36 Salmonella phages from several animal farms in Thailand and tested them on 47 Salmonella strains from several sources, including farms, seafood processing plant and humans in Thailand and USA. Phages were classified into three major groups. The estimated phage genome size showed the range from 50 ± 2 to 200 ± 2 kb. An effective phage cocktail consisting of three phages was developed. Approximately 4 log CFU/mL of S. Enteritidis and S. Typhimurium could be reduced. These phages revealed a burst size of up to 97.7 on S. Enteritidis and 173.7 PFU/cell on S. Typhimurium. Our phage cocktail could decrease S. Enteritidis on chicken meat and sunflower sprouts by 0.66 log CFU/cm2 and 1.27 log CFU/g, respectively. S. Typhimurium on chicken meat and sunflower sprouts were decreased by 1.73 log CFU/cm2 and 1.17 log CFU/g, respectively. Overall, animal farms in Thailand provided high abundance and diversity of Salmonella phages with the lysis ability on Salmonella hosts from various environments and continents. A developed phage cocktail suggests a potential biocontrol against Salmonella in fresh foods. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biocontrol of Food Borne Pathogens)
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Open AccessArticle Distribution and Antimicrobial Resistance of Salmonella Isolated from Pigs with Diarrhea in China
Microorganisms 2018, 6(4), 117; https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms6040117
Received: 30 September 2018 / Revised: 15 November 2018 / Accepted: 18 November 2018 / Published: 26 November 2018
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Abstract
Salmonella can cause enteric diseases in humans and a wide range of animals, and even outbreaks of foodborne illness. The aim of this study was to investigate the frequency and distribution of serovars, and antimicrobial resistance in Salmonella isolates from pigs with diarrhea [...] Read more.
Salmonella can cause enteric diseases in humans and a wide range of animals, and even outbreaks of foodborne illness. The aim of this study was to investigate the frequency and distribution of serovars, and antimicrobial resistance in Salmonella isolates from pigs with diarrhea in 26 provinces in China from 2014 to 2016. A total of 104 Salmonella isolates were identified and the dominant serovar was S. 4,[5],12:i:- (53.9%). All Salmonella isolates were resistant to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, and many were resistant to ampicillin (80.8%) and tetracycline (76.9%). Among 104 Salmonella isolates, aac(6′)-Ib-cr was the dominant plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance gene (80.8%), followed by qnrS (47.1%). The pulsed-field gel electrophoresis results suggest that the Salmonella isolates from different regions were genetically diverse, and ST34 was the most prevalent. S. 4,[5],12:i:- isolates is the widespread presence of heavy metal tolerance genes. The fact that the same sequence types were found in different regions and the high similarity coefficient of S. 4,[5],12:i:- isolates from different regions indicate the clonal expansion of the isolates, and the isolates carried various antimicrobial resistance genes. The multidrug resistant Salmonella can be widely detected in pigs, which will present a challenge for farm husbandry. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biocontrol of Food Borne Pathogens)
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Review

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Open AccessReview Phage Endolysins as Potential Antimicrobials against Multidrug Resistant Vibrio alginolyticus and Vibrio parahaemolyticus: Current Status of Research and Challenges Ahead
Microorganisms 2019, 7(3), 84; https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms7030084
Received: 25 February 2019 / Revised: 14 March 2019 / Accepted: 15 March 2019 / Published: 18 March 2019
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Abstract
Vibrio alginolyticus and V. parahaemolyticus, the causative agents of Vibriosis in marine vertebrates and invertebrates, are also responsible for fatal illnesses such as gastroenteritis, septicemia, and necrotizing fasciitis in humans via the ingestion of contaminated seafood. Aquaculture farmers often rely on extensive prophylactic [...] Read more.
Vibrio alginolyticus and V. parahaemolyticus, the causative agents of Vibriosis in marine vertebrates and invertebrates, are also responsible for fatal illnesses such as gastroenteritis, septicemia, and necrotizing fasciitis in humans via the ingestion of contaminated seafood. Aquaculture farmers often rely on extensive prophylactic use of antibiotics in farmed fish to mitigate Vibrios and their biofilms. This has been postulated as being of serious concern in the escalation of antibiotic resistant Vibrios. For this reason, alternative strategies to combat aquaculture pathogens are in high demand. Bacteriophage-derived lytic enzymes and proteins are of interest to the scientific community as promising tools with which to diminish our dependency on antibiotics. Lysqdvp001 is the best-characterized endolysin with lytic activity against multiple species of Vibrios. Various homologues of Vibrio phage endolysins have also been studied for their antibacterial potential. These novel endolysins are the major focus of this mini review. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biocontrol of Food Borne Pathogens)
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