Special Issue "Diverse Structures and Functions of Bacterial Effectors"

A special issue of Microorganisms (ISSN 2076-2607). This special issue belongs to the section "Molecular Microbiology and Immunology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 March 2021).

Special Issue Editor

Dr. James Garnett
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Centre for Host-Microbiome Interactions, King’s College London, Guy’s Hospital, London SE1 9RT, UK
Interests: biofilm formation; adhesion; secretion systems; structural biology; host–pathogen interactions; virulence factors; effectors; glycan

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Bacterial infections are associated with some of the largest burdens to human health across the globe. Pathogenic bacteria have developed sophisticated mechanisms to secrete virulence proteins directly into animal and plant cells. Once inside their host, these effectors perform various functions that include the regulation of endosomal/apoptotic pathways, modulation of cytoskeleton structure, and evasion of host-immune responses. In order to carry out these diverse functions, many bacterial effectors have evolved to imitate endogenous host proteins, in both their subcellular targeting and specific activities. Whilst analysis of primary amino acid sequences and tertiary structures can sometimes elude to function, this is often not the case. This is because these bacterial proteins frequently mimic smaller subregions of host regulatory factors or use completely different structural elements to induce similar changes in host proteins. This Special Issue of Microorganisms will be dedicated to understanding the diversity in bacterial effector structures and functions during infection. This will include the following themes: structures of novel effectors; common structural motifs of effectors; specific functions of effectors in ecology and disease; challenges and tools in identifying effector functions and subcellular localization; role of moonlighting effector proteins during infection; and the practical applications of bacterial effector research in treating disease.

Dr. James Garnett
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Microorganisms is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Effector
  • Bacteria
  • Structure
  • Virulence factor
  • Pathogen
  • Moonlighting protein
  • Therapeutics

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Review

Review
Effectors Targeting the Unfolded Protein Response during Intracellular Bacterial Infection
Microorganisms 2021, 9(4), 705; https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms9040705 - 29 Mar 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1070
Abstract
The unfolded protein response (UPR) is a homeostatic response to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress within eukaryotic cells. The UPR initiates transcriptional and post-transcriptional programs to resolve ER stress; or, if ER stress is severe or prolonged, initiates apoptosis. ER stress is a common [...] Read more.
The unfolded protein response (UPR) is a homeostatic response to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress within eukaryotic cells. The UPR initiates transcriptional and post-transcriptional programs to resolve ER stress; or, if ER stress is severe or prolonged, initiates apoptosis. ER stress is a common feature of bacterial infection although the role of the UPR in host defense is only beginning to be understood. While the UPR is important for host defense against pore-forming toxins produced by some bacteria, other bacterial effector proteins hijack the UPR through the activity of translocated effector proteins that facilitate intracellular survival and proliferation. UPR-mediated apoptosis can limit bacterial replication but also often contributes to tissue damage and disease. Here, we discuss the dual nature of the UPR during infection and the implications of UPR activation or inhibition for inflammation and immunity as illustrated by different bacterial pathogens. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Diverse Structures and Functions of Bacterial Effectors)
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