Plant and Human Probiotics: Consequences on the Autochthonous Microbiota

A special issue of Microorganisms (ISSN 2076-2607). This special issue belongs to the section "Food Microbiology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 September 2024 | Viewed by 3283

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Sciences and Technological Innovation, University of Piemonte Orientale, viale T. Michel, 11-15121 Alessandria, Italy
Interests: soil microbial ecology; rhizosphere; plant–microbe interactions; PGPB
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dipartimento per lo Sviluppo Sostenibile e la Transizione Ecologica, Università del Piemonte Orientale, 13100 Vercelli, Italy
Interests: soil microbiome; gut microbiome; metaproteome; holobiont
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Sciences and Technological Innovation, University of Piemonte Orientale, viale T. Michel, 11-15121 Alessandria, Italy
Interests: PGPB; plant microbiota; metagenome; metaproteome
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
Research and Development, Sacco SRL, 22071 Cadorago, Italy
Interests: plant growth promoters; plant physiology; crop genetics
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In 2001, the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) and the WHO defined probiotics as “live microorganisms, which, when administered in adequate amounts, confer a health benefit on the host”. This definition, which used the term “host”, overcame the previous definitions, enlarging the applicable range of these microorganisms to not only humans, but also to plants. While human probiotics are well known for their beneficial effects (such as cholesterol reduction, inhibition of carcinogenesis, maintenance of urogenital and gastrointestinal tract health, modulation of the immune system, as well as many other functions), plant probiotics are microorganisms that are able to improve plant nutrient acquisition, suppress soil-borne diseases, and increase the tolerance of plants to environmental stresses. Several studies have been published pertaining to the selection, identification, and characterization of human and plant probiotics, and to their impact on the host. However, once probiotics are introduced into the host, pre-existing balances among the resident members of the microbiota are interrupted, and new, intricate and complex interactions, involving the host, the environment and the probiotics, are created. Many open questions remain regarding how the microbial community is altered after the use of human and plant probiotics (intended both as single strain or artificial consortia) within the autochthonous microbiome. This Special Issue accepts original research, perspectives, minireviews, commentaries, and opinion papers that aim to fill in this gap of knowledge.

Dr. Elisa Gamalero
Dr. Elisa Bona
Dr. Giorgia Novello
Dr. Francesco Vuolo
Guest Editors

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Keywords

  • plant microbiome
  • plant-microbe interactions
  • human microbiome
  • gut microflora
  • resident microflora

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Review

26 pages, 1907 KiB  
Review
Impact of Plant-Beneficial Bacterial Inocula on the Resident Bacteriome: Current Knowledge and Future Perspectives
by Francesco Vuolo, Giorgia Novello, Elisa Bona, Susanna Gorrasi and Elisa Gamalero
Microorganisms 2022, 10(12), 2462; https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms10122462 - 13 Dec 2022
Cited by 12 | Viewed by 2459
Abstract
The inoculation of plant growth-promoting bacteria (PGPB) as biofertilizers is one of the most efficient and sustainable strategies of rhizosphere manipulation leading to increased plant biomass and yield and improved plant health, as well as the ameliorated nutritional value of fruits and edible [...] Read more.
The inoculation of plant growth-promoting bacteria (PGPB) as biofertilizers is one of the most efficient and sustainable strategies of rhizosphere manipulation leading to increased plant biomass and yield and improved plant health, as well as the ameliorated nutritional value of fruits and edible seeds. During the last decades, exciting, but heterogeneous, results have been obtained growing PGPB inoculated plants under controlled, stressful, and open field conditions. On the other hand, the possible impact of the PGPB deliberate release on the resident microbiota has been less explored and the little available information is contradictory. This review aims at filling this gap: after a brief description of the main mechanisms used by PGPB, we focus our attention on the process of PGPB selection and formulation and we provide some information on the EU regulation for microbial inocula. Then, the concept of PGPB inocula as a tool for rhizosphere engineering is introduced and the possible impact of bacterial inoculant on native bacterial communities is discussed, focusing on those bacterial species that are included in the EU regulation and on other promising bacterial species that are not yet included in the EU regulation. Full article
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