Advantages and Disadvantages of Antimicrobials

A special issue of Microorganisms (ISSN 2076-2607). This special issue belongs to the section "Antimicrobial Agents and Resistance".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 June 2024) | Viewed by 4308

Special Issue Editors

1. Department of Pharmacy, Mie University Hospital, Mie 5148507, Japan
2. Department of Clinical Pharmaceutics, Mie University Graduate School of Medicine, Mie 5148507, Japan
3. Department of Clinical Infectious Diseases, Aichi Medical University, Aichi 4801195, Japan
Interests: infections and antibiotic use; efficacy and safety of antibiotics; antibiotic resistance; PK/PD study; animal infectious model; meta-analysis
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Co-Guest Editor
Department of Pharmacy, Tosei General Hospital, Seto, Japan
Interests: infections and antibiotic use; efficacy and safety of antibiotics

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Dear Colleagues, Antimicrobials save many patients' lives and improved their quality of life when administered. However, an inappropriate use of antimicrobials is a recent critical issue, where there are concerns that patients may develop drug resistance or suffer needless adverse events due to overuse of antimicrobials. In addition, multiple antimicrobials or combination therapy with antimicrobials are frequently perfomed in clinical settings, and the treatment should compositely be discussed not only in terms of efficacy and safety, but also in terms of economics. Therefore, there are challenges to be adressed since antimicrobials work both ways. We invite manuscripts in a wide range of formats, including commentaries, original research, short reports, reviews and meta-analyses from medical, pharmacological and microbiological perspectives on the advantage or disadvantage of antimicrobials in promoting the appropriate use of antimicrobials.

Dr. Hideo Kato
Dr. Takumi Umemura
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Microorganisms is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • antimicrobial: appropriate use
  • combination therapy
  • in vitro
  • in vivo

Published Papers (2 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

12 pages, 2012 KiB  
Article
Comparison of Antibiofilm Activity of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Phages on Isolates from Wounds of Diabetic and Non-Diabetic Patients
by Sarika Suresh, Joylin Saldanha, Ashwini Bhaskar Shetty, Ramya Premanath, D. S. Akhila and Juliet Roshini Mohan Raj
Microorganisms 2023, 11(9), 2230; https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms11092230 - 4 Sep 2023
Viewed by 1434
Abstract
The persistence of organisms as biofilms and the increase in antimicrobial resistance has raised the need for alternative strategies. The study objective was to compare the ability of isolated bacteriophages to remove in vitro biofilms formed by Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from the environment [...] Read more.
The persistence of organisms as biofilms and the increase in antimicrobial resistance has raised the need for alternative strategies. The study objective was to compare the ability of isolated bacteriophages to remove in vitro biofilms formed by Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from the environment with those isolated from diabetic and non-diabetic wounds. P. aeruginosa were isolated from clinical and environmental sites, and antimicrobial susceptibility was tested. Bacteriophages were isolated and characterized based on plaque morphology and host range. A reduction in the viable count assayed the lytic ability of candidate phages. The crystal violet method was used to determine the residual biofilm after 24 h of phage treatment on 72-h-old biofilms. The statistical significance of phage treatment was tested by one-way ANOVA. Of 35 clinical isolates, 17 showed resistance to 1 antibiotic at least, and 7 were multidrug resistant. Nineteen environmental isolates and 11 clinical isolates were drug-sensitive. Nine phages showed 91.2% host coverage, including multidrug-resistant isolates. Phages eradicated 85% of biofilms formed by environmental isolates compared to 58% of biofilms of diabetic isolates and 56% of biofilms of non-diabetic isolates. Clinical isolates are susceptible to phage infection in planktonic form. Biofilms of P. aeruginosa isolated from diabetic wounds and non-diabetic wounds resist removal by phages compared to biofilms formed by environmental isolates. All phages were efficient in dispersing PAO1 biofilms. However, there was a significant difference in their ability to disperse PAO1 biofilms across the different surfaces tested. Partial eradication of biofilm by phages can aid in complementing antibiotics that are unable to penetrate biofilms in a clinical set-up. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advantages and Disadvantages of Antimicrobials)
Show Figures

Figure 1

9 pages, 820 KiB  
Article
Evaluation of the Effectiveness and Use of Anti-Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Agents for Aspiration Pneumonia in Older Patients Using a Nationwide Japanese Administrative Database
by Satoru Koga, Takahiro Takazono, Takashi Kido, Keiji Muramatsu, Kei Tokutsu, Takatomo Tokito, Daisuke Okuno, Yuya Ito, Hirokazu Yura, Kazuaki Takeda, Naoki Iwanaga, Hiroshi Ishimoto, Noriho Sakamoto, Kazuhiro Yatera, Koichi Izumikawa, Katsunori Yanagihara, Yoshihisa Fujino, Kiyohide Fushimi, Shinya Matsuda and Hiroshi Mukae
Microorganisms 2023, 11(8), 1905; https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms11081905 - 27 Jul 2023
Viewed by 1194
Abstract
Studies indicated potential harm from empirical broad-spectrum therapy. A recent study of hospitalizations for community-acquired pneumonia suggested that empirical anti-methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) therapy was associated with an increased risk of death and other complications. However, limited evidence supports empirical anti-MRSA therapy for [...] Read more.
Studies indicated potential harm from empirical broad-spectrum therapy. A recent study of hospitalizations for community-acquired pneumonia suggested that empirical anti-methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) therapy was associated with an increased risk of death and other complications. However, limited evidence supports empirical anti-MRSA therapy for older patients with aspiration pneumonia. In a nationwide Japanese database, patients aged ≥65 years on admission with aspiration pneumonia were analyzed. Patients were divided based on presence of respiratory failure and further sub-categorized based on their condition within 3 days of hospital admission, either receiving a combination of anti-MRSA agents and other antibiotics, or not using MRSA agents. An inverse probability weighting method with estimated propensity scores was used. Out of 81,306 eligible patients, 55,098 had respiratory failure, and 26,208 did not. In the group with and without respiratory failure, 0.93% and 0.42% of the patients, respectively, received anti-MRSA agents. In patients with respiratory failure, in-hospital mortality (31.38% vs. 19.03%, p < 0.001), 30-day mortality, and 90-day mortality were significantly higher, and oxygen administration length was significantly longer in the anti-MRSA agent combination group. Anti-MRSA agent combination use did not improve the outcomes in older patients with aspiration pneumonia and respiratory failure, and should be carefully and comprehensively considered. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advantages and Disadvantages of Antimicrobials)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop