Special Issue "Thermomechanical Processing of Steels"

A special issue of Metals (ISSN 2075-4701).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 July 2019

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. José María Rodríguez-Ibabe

President and Researcher at CEIT and Professor at Universidad de Navarra-Tecnun;
CEIT and Universidad de Navarra-Tecnun, M. Lardizabal 15, 20018 Donostia-San Sebastian, Basque Country, Spain
E-Mail
Interests: microstructure; microscopy; thermomechanical processing; microalloying; steels; metallurgy; modelling
Guest Editor
Dr. Pello Uranga

Associate Director of the Materials and Manufacturing Division at CEIT and Associate Professor at Universidad de Navarra-Tecnun;
CEIT and Universidad de Navarra-Tecnun, M. Lardizabal 15, 20018 Donostia-San Sebastian, Basque Country, Spain
Website | E-Mail
Interests: phase transformations; microstructure; microscopy; microalloying; steels; metallurgy; materials science; modelling

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The combination of hot working technologies with a thermal path, under controlled conditions, i.e., thermomechanical processing, provides opportunities to achieve required mechanical properties at lower costs. The replacement of conventional rolling plus post-rolling heat treatments by integrated controlled forming and cooling strategies implies important reductions in energy consumption, increases in productivity and more compact facilities in the steel industry. The metallurgical challenges that this integration implies, though, are relevant and impressive developments that have been achieved over the last 40 years. The development of new steel grades and processing technologies devoted to thermomechanically-processed products are increasing and their implementation is being expended to higher value added products and applications.

The achievement of mechanical properties and process stability during a Thermomechanical Controlled Process (TMCP), depend on the chemical composition, process parameter control and optimization, as well as post-forming cooling strategy and thermal treatments. Therefore, this Special Issue would like to combine contributions on different fields, topics, steel grades and forming technologies applying TMCP processes to steels. Papers regarding forming technologies, such as rolling, forging, hot-stamping, etc., using microalloyed, medium/high Mn or alternative high alloyed grades will be welcome. New technologies, such as near-net-shape production, innovative cooling strategies, such as direct quenching, quenching and partitioning or additional controlled cooling strategies will be the base for current and future new product developments.

In addition to the metallurgical peculiarities and relationships between chemical composition, process and final properties, the impact of advanced characterization techniques and innovative modelling strategies provides new tools to achieve further deployment of the TMCP technologies.

For this Special Issue on "Thermomechanical Processing of Steels", we would like to invite researchers from the steel industry and academia to submit their latest developments and achievements in the field.

Prof. Dr. José María Rodríguez-Ibabe
Dr. Pello Uranga
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Metals is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Thermomechanical processing
  • Steels
  • Hot working
  • Phase transformations
  • Microstructure
  • Mechanical properties
  • Modelling

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Microstructure Formation of Low-Carbon Ferritic Stainless Steel during High Temperature Plastic Deformation
Metals 2019, 9(4), 463; https://doi.org/10.3390/met9040463
Received: 11 March 2019 / Revised: 16 April 2019 / Accepted: 18 April 2019 / Published: 20 April 2019
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Abstract
In this paper, the effects of the deformation temperature, the deformation reduction and the deformation rate on the microstructural formation, ferritic and martensitic phase transformation, stress–strain behaviors and micro-hardness in low-carbon ferritic stainless steel were investigated. The increase in deformation temperature promotes the [...] Read more.
In this paper, the effects of the deformation temperature, the deformation reduction and the deformation rate on the microstructural formation, ferritic and martensitic phase transformation, stress–strain behaviors and micro-hardness in low-carbon ferritic stainless steel were investigated. The increase in deformation temperature promotes the formation of the fine equiaxed dynamic strain-induced transformation ferrite and suppresses the martensitic transformation. The higher deformation temperature results in a lower starting temperature for martensitic transformation. The increase in deformation can effectively promote the transformation of DSIT ferrite, and decrease the martensitic transformation rate, which is caused by the work hardening effect on the metastable austenite. The increase in the deformation rate leads to an increase in the ferrite fraction, because a high density of dislocation remains that can provide sufficient nucleation sites for ferrite transformation. The slow deformation rate results in dynamic recovery according to the stress–strain curve. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Thermomechanical Processing of Steels)
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Open AccessArticle
Exploring the Difference in Bainite Transformation with Varying the Prior Austenite Grain Size in Low Carbon Steel
Metals 2018, 8(12), 988; https://doi.org/10.3390/met8120988
Received: 2 November 2018 / Revised: 19 November 2018 / Accepted: 21 November 2018 / Published: 24 November 2018
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (25991 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The simulation welding thermal cycle technique was employed to generate different sizes of prior austenite grains. Dilatometry tests, in situ laser scanning confocal microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy were used to investigate the role of prior austenite grain size on bainite transformation in [...] Read more.
The simulation welding thermal cycle technique was employed to generate different sizes of prior austenite grains. Dilatometry tests, in situ laser scanning confocal microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy were used to investigate the role of prior austenite grain size on bainite transformation in low carbon steel. The bainite start transformation (Bs) temperature was reduced by fine austenite grains (lowered by about 30 °C under the experimental conditions). Through careful microstructural observation, it can be found that, besides the Hall–Petch strengthening effect, the carbon segregation at the fine austenite grain boundaries is probably another factor that decreases the Bs temperature as a result of the increase in interfacial energy of nucleation. At the early stage of the transformation, the bainite laths nucleate near to the grain boundaries and grow in a “side-by-side” mode in fine austenite grains, whereas in coarse austenite grains, the sympathetic nucleation at the broad side of the pre-existing laths causes the distribution of bainitic ferrite packets to be interlocked. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Thermomechanical Processing of Steels)
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