Advances in Selective Laser Melting

A special issue of Metals (ISSN 2075-4701). This special issue belongs to the section "Additive Manufacturing".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 September 2019) | Viewed by 20961

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Nagoya University, Nagoya, Japan
Interests: physical metallurgy; microstructure; intermetallics; thermodynamic assessments; electron microscopy; additive manufacturing

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Nagoya University, Nagoya, Japan
Interests: additive manufacturing; nature inspired materials; metallic foams (porous metals); metal matrix composites; metal/polymer jointing; combustion synthesis

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Additive manufacturing (AM) technologies have the great potential to provide an innovation in how metal products are designed and manufactured. The AM process has recently provided novel approaches to control topological structures and microstructure of metal products, which are incorporated in many different varieties of industrial materials applied for automobiles, aircrafts and medical implants. One of the most commonly-used AM processes is a selective laser melting (SLM) combined with powder bed system. The SLM process uses laser beams to melt and fuse powder metals and/or alloys, which may include selective laser sintering (SLS), direct metal laser sintering (DMLS) and selective heat sintering (SHS). This Special Issue covers a wide scope, comprising new (modified) processing routes, product materials, theoretical computations and applications associated with the SLM process including the powder technologies. In addition, recent advances in electron beam melting (EBM) technologies are welcome as well. Topics of particular interest include, but are not limited to:

  • Advancements in selective laser melting (SLM) process
  • New laser processing technologies combined with powder bed system
  • Properties and performance of SLM-produced metals and alloys—mechanical, thermal, electrical, chemical and biologicals
  • Microstructural control of SLM-produced metals and alloys
  • Material (alloy) designs for manufacturing products by SLM
  • Topological designs of metal products applicable for SLM
  • Theoretical computations to further understand phenomenon during SLM processing

Assoc. Prof. Dr. Naoki Takata
Prof. Dr. Makoto Kobashi
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Metals is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Selective laser melting
  • Laser processing
  • Scan strategy
  • Powder metallurgy
  • Rapid melting and solidification
  • Microstructure
  • Physical (mechanical, thermal) and electrochemical (biological) properties
  • Multi-materials and composites
  • Applications (automotive, aviation, consumer electronics, bio-medical, etc.)

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

16 pages, 3703 KiB  
Article
Effect of Process Parameters on Residual Stresses, Distortions, and Porosity in Selective Laser Melting of Maraging Steel 300
by Lameck Mugwagwa, Igor Yadroitsev and Stephen Matope
Metals 2019, 9(10), 1042; https://doi.org/10.3390/met9101042 - 25 Sep 2019
Cited by 60 | Viewed by 4998
Abstract
Selective laser melting (SLM) is one of the most well-known additive manufacturing methods available for the fabrication of functional parts from metal powders. Although SLM is now an established metal additive manufacturing technique, its widespread application in industry is still hindered by inherent [...] Read more.
Selective laser melting (SLM) is one of the most well-known additive manufacturing methods available for the fabrication of functional parts from metal powders. Although SLM is now an established metal additive manufacturing technique, its widespread application in industry is still hindered by inherent phenomena, one of which is high residual stresses. Some of the effects of residual stresses–such as warping and thermal stress-related cracking–cannot be corrected by post processing. Therefore, establishing input process parameter combinations that result in the least residual stress magnitudes and related distortions and/or cracking is critical. This paper presents the influence of laser power, scanning speed, and layer thickness on residual stresses, distortions and achievable density for maraging steel 300 steel parts in order to establish the most optimum input parameter combinations. An analysis of the interdependence between process outcomes shows that high residual stress magnitudes lead to high dimensional distortions in the finished parts, whilst porous parts suffer relatively lower residual stresses and associated distortions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Selective Laser Melting)
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15 pages, 7302 KiB  
Article
Influence of Material Property Variation on Computationally Calculated Melt Pool Temperature during Laser Melting Process
by Sazzad H. Ahmed and Ahsan Mian
Metals 2019, 9(4), 456; https://doi.org/10.3390/met9040456 - 18 Apr 2019
Cited by 12 | Viewed by 4606
Abstract
Selective Laser Melting (SLM) is a popular additive manufacturing (AM) method where a laser beam selectively melts powder layer by layer based on the building geometry. The melt pool peak temperature during build process is an important parameter to determine build quality of [...] Read more.
Selective Laser Melting (SLM) is a popular additive manufacturing (AM) method where a laser beam selectively melts powder layer by layer based on the building geometry. The melt pool peak temperature during build process is an important parameter to determine build quality of a fabricated component by SLM process. The melt pool temperature depends on process parameters including laser power, scanning speed, and hatch space as well as the properties of the build material. In this paper, the sensitivity of melt pool peak temperature during the build process to temperature dependent material properties including density, specific heat, and thermal conductivity are investigated for a range of laser powers and laser scanning speeds. It is observed that the melt pool temperature is most sensitive to melt pool thermal conductivity of the processed material for a set of specific process parameters (e.g., laser power and scan speed). Variations in the other mechanical–physical properties of powder and melt pool such as density and specific heat are found to have minimal effect on melt pool temperature. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Selective Laser Melting)
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11 pages, 4068 KiB  
Article
Material Characterization, Thermal Analysis, and Mechanical Performance of a Laser-Polished Ti Alloy Prepared by Selective Laser Melting
by Yu-Hang Li, Bing Wang, Cheng-Peng Ma, Zhi-Hao Fang, Long-Fei Chen, Ying-Chun Guan and Shou-Feng Yang
Metals 2019, 9(2), 112; https://doi.org/10.3390/met9020112 - 22 Jan 2019
Cited by 38 | Viewed by 4757
Abstract
The laser polishing technique offers an adaptable, accurate, and environmentally friendly solution to enhance the surface quality of additive manufactured metallic components. Recent work has shown that the surface roughness of laser additive manufactured metallic alloys can be significantly reduced via the laser [...] Read more.
The laser polishing technique offers an adaptable, accurate, and environmentally friendly solution to enhance the surface quality of additive manufactured metallic components. Recent work has shown that the surface roughness of laser additive manufactured metallic alloys can be significantly reduced via the laser polishing method. This paper examines the mechanical performances of a laser polished surface fabricated by selective laser melting (SLM). Compared with the original SLM surface, systematic measurements revealed that the surface roughness of the laser polished surface can be effectively reduced from 6.53 μm to 0.32 μm, while the microhardness and wear resistance increased by 25% and 39%, respectively. Through a thermal history analysis of the laser polishing process using the finite element model, new martensitic phase formation in the laser polished layer is carefully explained, which reveals significant effects on residual stress, strength, and fatigue. These findings establish foundational data to predict the mechanical performance of laser polished metallic components fabricated by additive manufacturing methods, and pave the way for functional surface design with practical application via the laser process. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Selective Laser Melting)
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15 pages, 27650 KiB  
Article
Study of Formed Oxides in IN718 Alloy during the Fabrication by Selective Laser Melting and Electron Beam Melting
by Hao Yu, Shigenari Hayashi, Koji Kakehi and Yen-Ling Kuo
Metals 2019, 9(1), 19; https://doi.org/10.3390/met9010019 - 24 Dec 2018
Cited by 33 | Viewed by 5620
Abstract
This study confirmed that Al2O3 particles were formed in IN718 alloys during the fabrication by both selective laser melting (SLM) and electron beam melting (EBM). Different heat pattern and atmospheres in SLM and EBM result in different distribution and volume [...] Read more.
This study confirmed that Al2O3 particles were formed in IN718 alloys during the fabrication by both selective laser melting (SLM) and electron beam melting (EBM). Different heat pattern and atmospheres in SLM and EBM result in different distribution and volume fraction of Al2O3 particles. The Al2O3 oxides would act as nucleation sites for the precipitation of Nb/Ti carbides, leading to the formation of unique core-shell composites with Al2O3 in the center and Ti/Nb at the periphery. In order to investigate the oxygen content introduced during SLM and EBM, the volume fraction of Al2O3 formed in spark plasm sintering (SPS)-fabricated substrate, by consolidating the pre-oxidized IN718 raw powders at 800 °C, was utilized. The oxygen contents introduced to IN718 substrates during SLM and EBM fabrication were calculated to be 0.030 wt% and 0.099 wt%, respectively. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Selective Laser Melting)
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