Metal Matrix Nanocomposites and Hybrids

A special issue of Metals (ISSN 2075-4701). This special issue belongs to the section "Metal Matrix Composites".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 June 2022) | Viewed by 6320

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, 31270-901 Belo Horizonte-MG, Brazil
Interests: severe plastic deformation; mechanical properties and superplasticity; magnesium

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, 31270-901 Belo Horizonte-MG, Brazil
Interests: shape memory alloys; metal processing; multicomponent alloys; thermoelastic transformation; Al alloys and composites; characterization

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Metal matrix nanocomposites (MMNCs) and hybrids include metals reinforced with nanosized particles or nanostructures or the general combination of phases aiming to improve their properties in comparison with their counterpart alloys or pure metals. The main challenge in this type of material is their processing, mostly presenting complications in the densification of the matrix, adhesion, dispersion of reinforcements, and control of morphology of phases. Many different processing routes have been developed during the past few decades, such as stir casting, squeeze casting, chemical and physical vapor deposition (CVD and PVD), spray deposition, powder metallurgy, and severe plastic deformation. However, many processing challenges remain up to date, and a broad range of matrix and reinforcements have emerged in recent years. Therefore, metal matrix nanocomposites and hybrids are an interesting and exciting topic for researchers in academia and industry.

The scope of this Special Issue will cover advances in the processing, microstructure, and properties of these materials. Additionally, new processing routes, such as additive manufacturing and severe plastic deformation, gradient structures, and advanced methods of characterization are also welcome.

Prof. Dr. Roberto Figueiredo
Prof. Dr. Eric Mazzer
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • metal matrix nanocomposites
  • hybrids
  • MMNC processing
  • severe plastic deformation
  • microstructure
  • mechanical properties
  • characterization

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

20 pages, 4682 KiB  
Article
Intriguing Prospects of a Novel Magnetic Nanohybrid Material: Ferromagnetic FeRh Nanoparticles Grown on Nanodiamonds
by Panagiotis Ziogas, Athanasios B. Bourlinos, Polyxeni Chatzopoulou, George P. Dimitrakopulos, Thomas Kehagias, Anastasios Markou and Alexios P. Douvalis
Metals 2022, 12(8), 1355; https://doi.org/10.3390/met12081355 - 15 Aug 2022
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1632
Abstract
A novel endeavor based on the synthesis, characterization and study of a hybrid crystalline magnetic nanostructured material composed of bimetallic iron–rhodium nanoalloys, grown on nanodiamond nanotemplates, is reported in this study. The development of this hybrid magnetic nanomaterial is grounded in the combination [...] Read more.
A novel endeavor based on the synthesis, characterization and study of a hybrid crystalline magnetic nanostructured material composed of bimetallic iron–rhodium nanoalloys, grown on nanodiamond nanotemplates, is reported in this study. The development of this hybrid magnetic nanomaterial is grounded in the combination of wet chemistry and thermal annealing under vacuum. In order to assess, evaluate and interpret the role and special properties of the nanodiamond supporting nanotemplates on the growth and properties of the bimetallic ferromagnetic Fe–Rh nanoparticles on their surfaces, unsupported free FeRh nanoparticles of the same nominal stoichiometry as for the hybrid sample were also synthesized. The characterization and study of the prepared samples with a range of specialized experimental techniques, including X-ray diffraction, transmission and scanning transmission electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray analysis, magnetization and magnetic susceptibility measurements and 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy, reveal that thermal annealing of the hybrid sample under specific conditions (vacuum, 700 °C, 30 min) leads to the formation of a rhodium-rich FeRh alloy nanostructured phase, with an average particle size of 4 nm and good dispersion on the surfaces of the nanodiamond nanotemplates and hard ferromagnetic characteristics at room temperature (coercivity of ~500 Oe). In contrast, thermal annealing of the unsupported free nanoparticle sample under the same conditions fails to deliver ferromagnetic characteristics to the FeRh nanostructured alloy phase, which shows only paramagnetic characteristics at room temperature and spin glass ordering at low temperatures. The ferromagnetic nanohybrids are proposed to be exploited in a variety of important technological applications, such as magnetic recording, magnetic resonance imaging contrast and magnetic hyperthermia agents. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Metal Matrix Nanocomposites and Hybrids)
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14 pages, 4439 KiB  
Article
Mechanical Activation-Assisted Solid-State Aluminothermic Reduction of CuO Powders for In-Situ Copper Matrix Composite Fabrication
by Sahand Arasteh, Afshin Masoudi, Alireza Abbasi and Saeid Lotfian
Metals 2022, 12(8), 1292; https://doi.org/10.3390/met12081292 - 31 Jul 2022
Viewed by 1830
Abstract
In this study, combustion synthesis involving mechanical milling and subsequent sintering process was utilised to fabricate Cu/AlxCuy/Al2O3 in-situ composite through the aluminothermic reduction of CuO powders. First, CuO and Al powders were mixed, and ball milled [...] Read more.
In this study, combustion synthesis involving mechanical milling and subsequent sintering process was utilised to fabricate Cu/AlxCuy/Al2O3 in-situ composite through the aluminothermic reduction of CuO powders. First, CuO and Al powders were mixed, and ball milled for 30–150 min to facilitate self-propagating high-temperature synthesis (SHS). Then, mechanically activated Al-CuO powders were mixed with elemental Cu powders and experienced subsequent cold compaction and sintering processes. The reactions during synthesis were studied utilising differential thermal analysis (DTA), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Densification and hardness of green and sintered bodies were also obtained. The results indicated that despite the negative free energy of the aluminothermic reaction, an initial activation energy supply is required, and mixed Al-CuO powders did not show significant progress in the combustion synthesis method. The aluminothermic reaction became probable whenever the activation energy was entirely provided by high-energy ball milling or by the sintering of ball-milled Al-CuO mixed powders. DTA results showed that the aluminothermic reaction temperature of Al-CuO decreased with milling times, whereas after 150 min of ball milling, the reaction was completed. XRD patterns revealed that the formation of Al2Cu and Al2O3 reinforcing phases resulted from CuO reduction with Al. Al4Cu9, Cu solid solution, and Al oxide phases were observed in sintered samples. The relative density of the samples was reduced compared to the green compacted parts due to the nature of the Cu-Al alloy and the occurrence of the swelling phenomenon. The hardness results indicated that in-situ formation of reinforcing phases in samples that experienced thermally assisted thermite reaction yielded superior hardness. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Metal Matrix Nanocomposites and Hybrids)
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12 pages, 4821 KiB  
Article
Hydrogen Sorption and Rehydrogenation Properties of NaMgH3
by Luis Contreras, Margarita Mayacela, Alberto Bustillos, Leonardo Rentería and David Book
Metals 2022, 12(2), 205; https://doi.org/10.3390/met12020205 - 22 Jan 2022
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 2308
Abstract
The formation and hydrogen sorption properties of the NaMgH3 perovskite/type hydride have been examined. Samples were mechanically ball milled under argon for 2, 5 and 15 h; then characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) coupled [...] Read more.
The formation and hydrogen sorption properties of the NaMgH3 perovskite/type hydride have been examined. Samples were mechanically ball milled under argon for 2, 5 and 15 h; then characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) coupled with a mass spectrometer (MS). Lattice parameters and cell volume of the main NaMgH3 phase increase as a function of milling. Dehydrogenation proceeded in two-step reactions for the NaMgH3. The maximum amount of released hydrogen was achieved for the 2 h milled NaMgH3 hydride accounting for 5.8 wt.% of H2 from 287 °C to 408 °C. Decomposed NaMgH3 samples were reversibly hydrogenated under 10 bar H2 at ~200 °C. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Metal Matrix Nanocomposites and Hybrids)
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