Special Issue "Selective Laser Melting"

A special issue of Metals (ISSN 2075-4701).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 June 2017)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Johannes Henrich Schleifenbaum

RWTH Aachen University - Digital Additive Production Fraunhofer, Institute for Laser Technology ILT Steinbachstr. 15, 52074 Aachen, Germany
Website | E-Mail

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Over the last years and decades, “Laser Beam Melting” (LBM)—known as “Selective Laser Melting” (SLM),“3D-printing”, “LaserCusing” and many more—has emerged from pure science, beyond part prototyping, to an individualized production technology. Individualized production is referred to as the manufacturing of products or lots of parts that are uniquely differentiated from one to the other. It is an emerging trend which provides added value and distinction within high value manufacturing: Suppliers can provide more ad hoc, competitive products (according to the customer’s wishes) and deliver new services and localized functionalities (production on demand). Besides individualization, Additive Manufacturing (AM) techniques like LBM enable a huge degree of freedom of geometry and thus enable functionally optimized components to be produced. For these reasons, AM is increasingly making its way into industrial manufacturing chains.
The goal of this Special Issue is to compile a broad range of state-of-the-art contributions in this field into a single collection. Research fields of interest will range from engineering and design, through materials design and process improvements, to fundamental mechanical evaluation of parts produced. I wish to suggest non-exclusively, the following research agenda:
Integration of functions, internal structures, hollow or lattice structures, topology-optimized design as well as monolithic design of former assemblies, light-weight design and manufacture, process and productivity improvements, new materials, material design for AM, process monitoring, quality control, process simulation, applications for series production, process chains, pre- and post-processing of AM-manufactured parts, mechanical properties, microstructure, cracks and defects, etc. to mention just a few.

Univ.-Prof. Dr.-Ing. Dipl.-Wirt. Ing. Johannes Henrich Schleifenbaum
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • Selective Laser Melting (SLM)
  • 3D printing
  • design for AM
  • (digital) process chains
  • material properties
  • part quality
  • productivity improvement
  • process monitoring
  • quality control
  • process simulation
  • new materials
  • materials for SLM
  • applications for series production

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle Fatigue Assessment of Ti–6Al–4V Circular Notched Specimens Produced by Selective Laser Melting
Metals 2017, 7(8), 291; https://doi.org/10.3390/met7080291
Received: 28 June 2017 / Revised: 25 July 2017 / Accepted: 28 July 2017 / Published: 31 July 2017
Cited by 12 | PDF Full-text (10878 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Additive manufacturing (AM) offers the potential to economically produce customized components with complex geometries in a shorter design-to-manufacture cycle. However, the basic understanding of the fatigue behavior of these materials must be substantially improved at all scale levels before the unique features of
[...] Read more.
Additive manufacturing (AM) offers the potential to economically produce customized components with complex geometries in a shorter design-to-manufacture cycle. However, the basic understanding of the fatigue behavior of these materials must be substantially improved at all scale levels before the unique features of this rapidly developing technology can be used in critical load bearing applications. This work aims to assess the fatigue strength of Ti–6Al–4V smooth and circular notched samples produced by selective laser melting (SLM). Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) was used to investigate the fracture surface of the broken samples in order to identify crack initiation points and fracture mechanisms. Despite the observed fatigue strength reduction induced by circular notched specimens compared to smooth specimens, notched samples showed a very low notch sensitivity attributed both to hexagonal crystal lattice characteristics of tempered alpha prime grains and to surface defects induced by the SLM process itself. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Selective Laser Melting)
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Open AccessArticle Structure, Texture and Phases in 3D Printed IN718 Alloy Subjected to Homogenization and HIP Treatments
Metals 2017, 7(6), 196; https://doi.org/10.3390/met7060196
Received: 11 April 2017 / Revised: 17 May 2017 / Accepted: 19 May 2017 / Published: 30 May 2017
Cited by 16 | PDF Full-text (10893 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
3D printing results in anisotropy in the microstructure and mechanical properties. The focus of this study is to investigate the structure, texture and phase evolution of the as-printed and heat treated IN718 superalloy. Cylindrical specimens, printed by powder-bed additive manufacturing technique, were subjected
[...] Read more.
3D printing results in anisotropy in the microstructure and mechanical properties. The focus of this study is to investigate the structure, texture and phase evolution of the as-printed and heat treated IN718 superalloy. Cylindrical specimens, printed by powder-bed additive manufacturing technique, were subjected to two post-treatments: homogenization (1100 °C, 1 h, furnace cooling) and hot isostatic pressing (HIP) (1160 °C, 100 MPa, 4 h, furnace cooling). The Selective laser melting (SLM) printed microstructure exhibited a columnar architecture, parallel to the building direction, due to the heat flow towards negative z-direction. Whereas, a unique structural morphology was observed in the x-y plane due to different cooling rates resulting from laser beam overlapping. Post-processing treatments reorganized the columnar structure of a strong {002} texture into fine columnar and/or equiaxed grains of random orientations. Equiaxed structure of about 150 µm average grain size, was achieved after homogenization and HIP treatments. Both δ-phase and MC-type brittle carbides, having rough morphologies, were formed at the grain boundaries. Delta-phase formed due to γ″-phase dissolution in the γ matrix, while MC-type carbides nucleates grew by diffusion of solute atoms. The presence of (Nb0.78Ti0.22)C carbide phase, with an fcc structure having a lattice parameter a = 4.43 Å, was revealed using Energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS) and X-ray diffractometer (XRD) analysis. The solidification behavior of IN718 alloy was described to elucidate the evolution of different phases during selective laser melting and post-processing heat treatments of IN718. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Selective Laser Melting)
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Other

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Open AccessErratum Erratum: Structure, Texture and Phases in 3D Printed IN718 Alloy Subjected to Homogenization and HIP Treatments. Metals 2017, 7, 196
Metals 2017, 7(8), 315; https://doi.org/10.3390/met7080315
Received: 2 August 2017 / Revised: 3 August 2017 / Accepted: 7 August 2017 / Published: 16 August 2017
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (172 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The authors wish to make the following corrections to the main text in the published paper [1]. In this paper, the weight of CuCl2 should be changed from 5 mg to 5 g to provide accurate recipe for the IN718 etchant.[...] Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Selective Laser Melting)
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