Special Issue "Studies on Aeronautical Metals by Friction Stir Welding"

A special issue of Metals (ISSN 2075-4701). This special issue belongs to the section "Welding and Joining".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 May 2023 | Viewed by 920

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Shude Ji
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
College of Aerospace Engineering, Shenyang Aerospace University, Shenyang 110136, China
Interests: friction stir welding; intelligent algorithm; numerical simulation
Dr. Xiangchen Meng
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
College of Materials, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001, China
Interests: welding and processing; aluminum alloys; polymer; magnesium alloys; microstructures; mechanical properties

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Weight loss is continually the goal when designing aeronautical crafts; therefore, due to their high specific strength and stiffness, aluminum alloys, magnesium alloys and titanium alloys have become important aeronautical structure metals. Joining technologies are required in the aeronautical industry to realize any structure—small or large, simple or complex. Friction stir welding (FSW) is a relatively new joining technology. The advantages of FSW include its low stress levels, high strength, low energy consumption and, with a welding peak temperature that is lower than the melting point of metals, a low-pollution manufacturing process. Thus far, as a solid-state welding technology, friction stir welding has attracted the attention of many scholars.

This Special Issue, “Studies on Aeronautical Metals by Friction Stir Welding”, will collect the latest contributions regarding the application of FSW technology to similar and dissimilar metals such as aluminum alloys, magnesium alloys, titanium alloys. We are inviting researchers to contribute manuscripts presenting the latest FSW findings using experimental analysis, numerical simulation and intelligent algorithms.The latest findings regarding friction stir repairing, friction stir processing and friction stir additive manufacturing are also welcome, provided that the technology derived from FSW can be used for aeronautical-structure metals.

Topics addressed in this Special Issue may include, but are not limited to,

  • Thermal cycles;
  • Flow behaviors;
  • Welding stress;
  • Welding deformation;
  • Microstructure evolution;
  • Mechanical properties;
  • Fracture behavior.

Prof. Dr. Shude Ji
Dr. Xiangchen Meng
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Metals is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • thermal cycles
  • flow behaviors
  • welding stress
  • welding deformation
  • microstructure evolution
  • mechanical properties
  • fracture behavior

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Article
Interface Characteristics and Mechanical Properties of 2024 Aluminum Alloy and 304 Stainless Steel Dissimilar Alloys FSLW Joint with Ni Interlayer
Metals 2022, 12(10), 1574; https://doi.org/10.3390/met12101574 - 22 Sep 2022
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Abstract
The composite structure of aluminum and steel (Al/steel) dissimilar metals has been applied in manufacturing industries for lightweight products, and friction stir lap welding (FSLW) has advantages for the welding of these two metals. To further enhance the strength of the Al/steel FSLW [...] Read more.
The composite structure of aluminum and steel (Al/steel) dissimilar metals has been applied in manufacturing industries for lightweight products, and friction stir lap welding (FSLW) has advantages for the welding of these two metals. To further enhance the strength of the Al/steel FSLW joint, a 0.02 mm thick nickel (Ni) foil was chosen as the interlayer, and slight plunging depth of a tool pin into the lower steel sheet was designed, which can respectively change the intermetallic compounds (IMCs) type and produce small welding heat. Choosing dissimilar 2024 aluminum alloy and 304 stainless steel materials as the research subject, the characteristics of the lap interface and the mechanical properties of the joint were mainly discussed. The results showed that the lap interface between the upper aluminum and lower steel sheets was made up of an AlNi3 IMCs layer, hook structure and mechanical occlusion. The AlNi3 IMCs layer with 2 μm thickness was in a reasonable range positive to the joint strength. When the rotating speed of the stirring tool increased from 800 to 1200 rpm and the welding speed of 75 mm/min was constant, the hook structure and the mechanical occlusion were both enhanced, and the tensile shear strength of the joint was decreased. A maximum joint tensile shear strength of 217 MPa was obtained at 800 rpm, and the strength value was 47.2 percent of that of the 2024 aluminum alloy base material. The Al/steel joint with shear fracture mode presented a brittle–ductile mixed fracture. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Studies on Aeronautical Metals by Friction Stir Welding)
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Article
Material Flow and Mechanical Properties of a Non-Keyhole Friction Stir Welded Aluminum Alloy with Improved Sleeve Bottom Geometry
Metals 2022, 12(9), 1415; https://doi.org/10.3390/met12091415 - 26 Aug 2022
Viewed by 401
Abstract
Non-keyhole friction stir welding (N-KFSW) is a technique that can fabricate a welding joint without a keyhole through a one-time welding process. The Al–Mg–Si alloy was chosen as a research object, and the N-KFSW technique was investigated by numerical and experimental methods. Firstly, [...] Read more.
Non-keyhole friction stir welding (N-KFSW) is a technique that can fabricate a welding joint without a keyhole through a one-time welding process. The Al–Mg–Si alloy was chosen as a research object, and the N-KFSW technique was investigated by numerical and experimental methods. Firstly, the sleeve bottoms of the N-KFSW welding tool system were innovatively optimized in this study. The optimal sleeve bottom with an 80° angle between the spiral groove and the sleeve inner side wall allowed avoiding the incomplete root penetration defect at the bottom of the stir zone (SZ), which was verified by numerical results and the C-shaped line height. Then, using a 3 mm-thick aluminum alloy as the experimental material, the material flow and joint formation characteristics and mechanical properties at 110, 150 and 190 mm/min welding speeds were studied and compared. The results showed that the SZ presented a drum shape due to the action of the clamping ring and the threads on the side wall of the sleeve. The SZ width decreased from 7.17 to 6.91 mm due to the decreased heat input. From 70 to 210 mm/min welding speed, the maximum tensile strength of the joint was 250 MPa at 190 mm/min, and the joint with relatively higher strength fractured at the heat-affected zone. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Studies on Aeronautical Metals by Friction Stir Welding)
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