Special Issue "Functional Porous Materials for Gas Storage and Separations in Emerging Energy Technologies"

A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944). This special issue belongs to the section "Porous Materials".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 August 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Pasquale Fernando Fulvio
Website
Guest Editor
Texas A&M University, Department of Nuclear Engineering, College Station, Texas 77843, USA
Interests: porous materials; 2D materials; carbons; silicates; surface chemistry; heterogeneous catalysis; separations; drug-delivery; energy storage; batteries; supercapacitors

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Hydrogen (H2) and methane (CH4) are emerging clean fuel alternatives to petroleum derivatives and coal. Meeting the US Department of Energy goals for efficiently storing and transporting these gases is of utmost importance for commercialization of these technologies in different sectors, i.e., energy, transportation, etc. The production of each is further tied to harmful byproduct emissions. Different types of porous materials have been extensively investigated for gas storage, and for H2 and CH4 enrichment, and have been instrumental in the successful implementation of the H2- and CH4- based economy.

In recent years, CH4 has been the subject of scrutiny, as geological resources require fracking and horizontal drilling technologies, which are associated with other environmental impacts, including the contamination of water plates. There is also the need for reducing or even completely eliminating gas leaks in geological production sites. Nonetheless, CH4 could reduce CO2 emissions by 50% or more compared to coal, and this gas could power the world for over 100 years. Methane is also the most abundant component of biogas, a largely wasted resource that is directly released into the atmosphere in farming areas; of the biodegradation of algae in coastal areas; and of organic waste in landfills. Since CH4 diffuses into the atmosphere faster than CO2, it is one of the major contributors to global warming. Moreover, natural CH4 resources contain hydrocarbons, CO2, and highly corrosive H2S impurities. In the case of H2, coal gasification and water–gas shift reactions constitute the main sources of this gas. To date, porous materials for membrane separations have been widely used to enrich H2 and CH4 feeds by separating them from generated CO, CO2, and other species. Consequently, sorbents to capture and store these gases play an ever-growing role in more sustainable energy and environmental processes. This particularly applies to H2 and CH4 production, distribution, and energy conversion steps, which further require the separation and storage of CO2 from post-combustion of CH4. These are only a few examples of technological challenges in the widespread implementation of the H2 and CH4 as cleaner fuels, which can easily complement other zero emission technologies such as solar, wind, marine, and nuclear energy.

In this Special Issue on “Functional Porous Materials for Gas Storage and Separations in Emerging Energy Technologies", researchers are invited to submit their recent works on the development of stable and selective sorbents for the enrichment of H2 and CH4 fuels and for H2S, CO, CO2, and other hydrocarbon byproducts’ capture and storage. These will be examined in detail together with materials for safe, high-capacity H2 and CH4 storage for uses in the automotive, aerospace, and energy sectors, in addition to alternative technologies for the recovery of biogas.

Dr. Pasquale Fernando Fulvio
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • porous materials
  • functional nanocomposites
  • membranes
  • hydrogen
  • methane
  • enrichment
  • storage
  • transportation

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Influence of the Presence of Different Alkali Cations and the Amount of Fe(CN)6 Vacancies on CO2 Adsorption on Copper Hexacyanoferrates
Materials 2019, 12(20), 3371; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma12203371 - 15 Oct 2019
Abstract
The CO2 adsorption on various Prussian blue analogue hexacyanoferrates was evaluated by thermogravimetric analysis. Compositions of prepared phases were verified by energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, infra-red spectroscopy and powder X-ray diffraction. The influence of different alkali cations in the cubic Fm3m [...] Read more.
The CO2 adsorption on various Prussian blue analogue hexacyanoferrates was evaluated by thermogravimetric analysis. Compositions of prepared phases were verified by energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, infra-red spectroscopy and powder X-ray diffraction. The influence of different alkali cations in the cubic Fm3m structures was investigated for nominal compositions A2/3Cu[Fe(CN)6]2/3 with A = vacant, Li, Na, K, Rb, Cs. The Rb and Cs compounds show the highest CO2 adsorption per unit cell, ~3.3 molecules of CO2 at 20 °C and 1 bar, while in terms of mmol/g the Na compound exhibits the highest adsorption capability, ~3.8 mmol/g at 20 °C and 1 bar. The fastest adsorption/desorption is exhibited by the A-cation free compound and the Li compound. The influence of the amount of Fe(CN)6 vacancies were assessed by determining the CO2 adsorption capabilities of Cu[Fe(CN)6]1/2 (Fm3m symmetry, nominally 50% vacancies), KCu[Fe(CN)6]3/4 (Fm3m symmetry, nominally 25% vacancies), and CsCu[Fe(CN)6] (I-4m2 symmetry, nominally 0% vacancies). Higher adsorption was, as expected, shown on compounds with higher vacancy concentrations. Full article
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