Special Issue "Nanocellulose-Based Advanced Materials"

A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944). This special issue belongs to the section "Advanced Nanomaterials and Nanotechnology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 May 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Assist. Prof. Nathalie Lavoine
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Guest Editor
Department of Forest Biomaterials, North Carolina State University, USA
Interests: cellulose nanomaterials; active/smart packaging; thermoresponsive polymers; controlled release system; biomass valorization; sustainable materials processing
Assoc. Prof. Dr. Lucian Lucia
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Guest Editor
Departments of Forest Biomaterials, Chemistry, North Carolina State University, USA
Interests: green chemistry; smart biopolymeric materials; self-healing phenomena; drug delivery approaches; tissue engineering scaffolds; hydrogels

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

From towels, tissues, diapers to packaging and particle-board, cellulose-based products are ubiquitous in our daily lives. Moreover, the past two decades have been privy to the emergence of a novel type of cellulose materials, nanocelluloses or cellulose nanomaterials. In addition to being renewable, biodegradable, and biocompatible, nanocelluloses have extended cellulose utilization possibilities to arenas well beyond our imagination. Their intrinsic value for utilization lies in their high strength-to-weight ratios, large surface areas, low coefficient of thermal expansions, and versatile chemistries, amongst other unique qualities. Such qualities endow them with the realizable potential to be used for a wide spectrum of applications spanning from packaging, art preservation, rheology modifiers for food, cement, and paint, to electronics, energy-storage devices, building insulation, and biomedical applications.

This Special Issue therefore aims at capturing the most salient recent developments in nanocellulose-based advanced materials by covering (i) the use of different cellulose sources for nanocellulose production, including biomass residues and lignin-containing pulps, (ii) relevant processing techniques to produce innovative nanocellulose-based advanced materials, (iii) any implemented (novel) characterization techniques, (iv) materials functional properties, and (v) target applications. Encouraged specific topics are: Structure–processing–property relationships of nanocellulose-based materials, use of green chemistry concepts, and nanocellulose-advanced materials for mass and heat transfer related applications.

Assist. Prof. Nathalie Lavoine
Assoc. Prof. Lucian Lucia
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • nanocelluloses applications
  • advanced materials
  • structure–function relationships
  • green chemistry
  • thermal properties

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Laminated Wallboard Panels Made with Cellulose Nanofibrils as a Binder: Production and Properties
Materials 2020, 13(6), 1303; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma13061303 - 13 Mar 2020
Abstract
This study explored the development and characterization of laminated wallboard panels using renewable materials for building applications. The panels are based on cellulose nanofibrils (CNFs) as a binder and wood particles. Other additives included FiberLeanTM (microfibrillated cellulose/calcium carbonate composite), starch and fire [...] Read more.
This study explored the development and characterization of laminated wallboard panels using renewable materials for building applications. The panels are based on cellulose nanofibrils (CNFs) as a binder and wood particles. Other additives included FiberLeanTM (microfibrillated cellulose/calcium carbonate composite), starch and fire retardant (boric acid/borax). These panels are also intended to address the environmental concerns of commercial gypsum boards. The manufacturing of the panels is via a wet-based process; hence no initial drying was required to remove the water from the CNF. It was found that the dosage of CNF (and/or FiberLeanTM) binder and the addition of starch had the largest impact upon the quality of the final product. The addition of starch was found more favorable in the presence of FiberLeanTM. The fire retardancy was induced by adding boric acid/borax (1:1). The burning test revealed that the panels treated with the fire retardant exhibited excellent burning properties comparable to that of gypsum board (inherently fire resistant). Interestingly, the addition of the boric acid/borax also appeared to increase the retention of starch in the system, leading to favorable mechanical properties. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanocellulose-Based Advanced Materials)
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Open AccessArticle
Structure-Property Relationships in Hybrid Cellulose Nanofibrils/Nafion-Based Ionic Polymer-Metal Composites
Materials 2019, 12(8), 1269; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma12081269 - 18 Apr 2019
Cited by 3
Abstract
Herein, we report the production of ionic polymer-metal composites (IPMCs) hybridized with cellulose nanofibrils (CNF) as a partial substitute for Nafion®. The aim is not only to reduce the production cost and enhance respective mechanical/thermal properties but also to bestow a [...] Read more.
Herein, we report the production of ionic polymer-metal composites (IPMCs) hybridized with cellulose nanofibrils (CNF) as a partial substitute for Nafion®. The aim is not only to reduce the production cost and enhance respective mechanical/thermal properties but also to bestow a considerable degree of biodegradability to such products. Formulations with different CNF/Nafion® ratios were produced in a thin-film casting process. Crack-free films were air-dried and plated by platinum (Pt) through an oxidation-reduction reaction. The produced hybrids were analyzed in terms of thermal stability, mechanical and morphological aspects to examine their performance compared to the Nafion-based IPMC prior to plating process. Results indicated that films with higher CNF loadings had improved tensile strengths and elastic moduli but reduced ductility. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) showed that the incorporation of CNF to the matrix reduced its thermal stability almost linearly, however, the onset of decomposition point remained above 120 °C, which was far above the temperature the composite membrane is expected to be exposed to. The addition of a cross-linking agent to the formulations helped with maintaining the integrity of the membranes during the plating process, thereby improving surface conductivity. The focus of the current study was on the physical and morphological properties of the films, and the presented data advocate the potential utilization of CNF as a nontoxic and sustainable bio-polymer for blending with perfluorosulfonic acid-based co-polymers, such as Nafion®, to be used in electroactive membranes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanocellulose-Based Advanced Materials)
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Open AccessArticle
Conductive Cellulose based Foam Formed 3D Shapes—From Innovation to Designed Prototype
Materials 2019, 12(3), 430; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma12030430 - 31 Jan 2019
Cited by 2
Abstract
In this article, we introduce for the first time, a method to manufacture cellulose based electrically conductive non-woven three-dimensional (3D) structures using the foam forming technology. The manufacturing is carried out using a minimum amount of processing steps, materials, and hazardous chemicals. The [...] Read more.
In this article, we introduce for the first time, a method to manufacture cellulose based electrically conductive non-woven three-dimensional (3D) structures using the foam forming technology. The manufacturing is carried out using a minimum amount of processing steps, materials, and hazardous chemicals. The optimized solution applies a single surfactant type and a single predefined portion for the two main processing steps: (1) the dispersing of nanocellulose (NC) and carbon nanotubes (CNT) and (2) the foam forming process. The final material system has a concentration of the used surfactant that is not only sufficient to form a stable and homogeneous nanoparticle dispersion, but it also results in stable foam in foam forming. In this way, the advantages of the foam forming process can be maximized for this application. The cellulose based composite material has a highly even distribution of CNTs over the NC network, resulting a conductivity level of 7.7 S/m, which increased to the value 8.0 S/m after surfactant removal by acetone washing. Also, the applicability and a design product case ‘Salmiakki’ were studied where the advantages of the material system were validated for a heating element application. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanocellulose-Based Advanced Materials)
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Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Author: Aji Mathew
Affiliation: Stockholm University, Sweden

Author: Mehdi Tajvidi
Affiliation: University of Maine, USA

Author:Johan Foster
Affiliation: Virginia Tech, USA

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