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Special Issue "Microstructures and Durability of Cement-Based Materials"

A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944). This special issue belongs to the section "Construction and Building Materials".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 April 2020

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Jeong Gook Jang

Division of Architecture and Urban Design, Institute of Urban Science, Incheon National University, 119 Academy-ro, Yeonsu-gu, Incheon 22012, Korea
Website | E-Mail
Interests: cement-based materials; cement chemistry; concrete engineering; sustainable materials; alternative binders; microstructure of concrete; durability
Guest Editor
Dr. Solmoi Park

Civil and Environmental Engineering Department, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 291 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 34141, Korea
Website | E-Mail
Interests: characterization of cement; alternative cementitious binders; durability; thermodynamic modelling

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Cement-based materials are the most widely used and important materials to build and maintain our society. They are crucially important for meeting the structural integrity and performance demand imposed on structures and, more importantly, for ensuring economic stability and sustainability to make a cement-based material with high durability. Recently, various types of cement-based materials have been studied and used in terms of sustainability and the advancement of these materials. Accumulating knowledge on the durability of newly developed cement-based materials is of utmost importance for understanding and expanding the use of these materials.

Cement-based materials have heterogeneous and complex microstructures that vary according to the types and mix proportions of materials used, the manufacturing method, the curing process, and the environment. By understanding the microstructure of cement-based materials using the latest analytical techniques, it is possible to enhance our understanding of the mechanical properties and durability of cement-based materials, which are closely related to the microstructure of these materials. Therefore, topics of interest include but are not limited to the following:

  • The characterization of Portland cement-based materials and those derived from alternative binders;
  • Materials design for enhanced durability;
  • Cementitious composites including advanced nano- and bio-materials;
  • Hydration and microstructural formation;
  • Durability of cement-based materials (e.g., chloride attack, carbonation, sulfate attack, acid attack, alkali-silica reaction, freeze/thaw, and bio-degradation);
  • Durability and sustainability assessment;
  • Life cycle assessment.

The aim of this Special Issue is to showcase the latest research and advances in this area, particularly on the microstructures and durability of various types of cement-based materials. Original research papers, state-of-the-art reviews, communications, and discussions are welcomed.

Prof. Dr. Jeong Gook Jang
Dr. Solmoi Park
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Materials is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Cement-based materials
  • Alternative binders
  • Microstructure
  • Durability
  • Characterization of material.

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Effect of CaSO4 Incorporation on Pore Structure and Drying Shrinkage of Alkali-Activated Binders
Materials 2019, 12(10), 1673; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma12101673
Received: 25 April 2019 / Revised: 15 May 2019 / Accepted: 17 May 2019 / Published: 23 May 2019
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Abstract
This present study investigates the effects of CaSO4 incorporation on the pore structure and drying shrinkage of alkali-activated slag and fly ash. The slag and fly ash were activated at a 5:5 ratio by weighing with a sodium silicate. Thereafter, 0%, 5%, [...] Read more.
This present study investigates the effects of CaSO4 incorporation on the pore structure and drying shrinkage of alkali-activated slag and fly ash. The slag and fly ash were activated at a 5:5 ratio by weighing with a sodium silicate. Thereafter, 0%, 5%, 10%, and 15% of CaSO4 were incorporated to investigate the changes in phase formation and internal pore structure. X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), thermogravimetry (TG)/derivative thermogravimetry (DTG), mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), and drying shrinkage tests were carried out to find the correlation between the pore structure and drying shrinkage of the specimens. The results showed that CaSO4 incorporation increased the formation of thenardite, and these phase changes affected the pore structure of the activated fly ash and slag. The increase in the CaSO4 content increased the pore distribution in the mesopore. As a result, the capillary tension and drying shrinkage decreased. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Microstructures and Durability of Cement-Based Materials)
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Open AccessArticle
Revealing the Microstructure Evolution and Carbonation Hardening Mechanism of β-C2S Pastes by Backscattered Electron Images
Materials 2019, 12(9), 1561; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma12091561
Received: 17 April 2019 / Revised: 6 May 2019 / Accepted: 8 May 2019 / Published: 13 May 2019
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Abstract
β-dicalcium silicate (β-C2S) minerals were prepared. The compositions, microstructures, and distributions of the carbonation products of hardened β-C2S paste were revealed by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform-infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, and backscattered electron (BSE) image analysis. The results show that [...] Read more.
β-dicalcium silicate (β-C2S) minerals were prepared. The compositions, microstructures, and distributions of the carbonation products of hardened β-C2S paste were revealed by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform-infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, and backscattered electron (BSE) image analysis. The results show that a dense hardened paste of β-C2S can be obtained after 24 h of carbonation curing. The hardened pastes are composed of pores, silica gel, calcium carbonate, and unreacted dicalcium silicate, with relative volume fractions of 1.3%, 42.1%, 44.9%, and 11.7%, respectively. The unreacted dicalcium silicate is encapsulated with a silica gel rim, and the pores between the original dicalcium silicate particles are filled with calcium carbonate. The sufficient carbonation products that rapidly formed during the carbonation curing process, forming a dense microstructure, are responsible for the carbonation hardening of the β-C2S mineral. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Microstructures and Durability of Cement-Based Materials)
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Figure 1

Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
Calcined Oyster Shell Powder as an Expansive Additive in Cement Mortar
Materials 2019, 12(8), 1322; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma12081322
Received: 1 April 2019 / Revised: 18 April 2019 / Accepted: 20 April 2019 / Published: 23 April 2019
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Abstract
The present study prepared calcined oyster shell powder having chemical composition and crystal structure of calcium oxide and lime, respectively, and investigated the fresh and hardened properties of cement mortar incorporating calcined oyster shell powder as an additive. The test results indicated that [...] Read more.
The present study prepared calcined oyster shell powder having chemical composition and crystal structure of calcium oxide and lime, respectively, and investigated the fresh and hardened properties of cement mortar incorporating calcined oyster shell powder as an additive. The test results indicated that the hydration of calcined oyster shell powder promoted the additional formation of Ca(OH)2 at the initial reaction stage, thereby increasing the heat of hydration. In particular, the volumetric increase of calcined oyster shell powder during hydration compensated the autogenous shrinkage of mortar at early ages, ultimately leading to a clear difference in the shrinkage values at final readings. However, an excessive incorporation of calcined oyster shell powder affected the rate of C–S–H formation in the acceleratory period of hydration, resulting in a decrease in the compressive strength development. Meanwhile, the degree of flow loss was inconsequential and rapid flow loss was not observed in the specimens with calcined oyster shell powder. Therefore, considering the fresh and hardened properties of cement mortar, the incorporation of calcined oyster shell powder of approximately 3% by weight of cement is recommended to enhance the properties of cement mortar in terms of compressive strength and autogenous shrinkage. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Microstructures and Durability of Cement-Based Materials)
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