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Special Issue "Advanced Biomass-Derived Carbon Materials"

A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944). This special issue belongs to the section "Carbon Materials".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 25 September 2019.

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Andrea Kruse

Institute of Agricultural Engineering, Conversion Technologies of Biobased Resources, Universität Hohenheim / University of Hohenheim, Stuttgart, Germany
Website | E-Mail
Interests: hydrothermal carbonization; carbon materials; platform-chemicals from biomass; nutrient recovery; hydrothermal conversion; hydrothermal liquefaction; hydrothermal gasification; hydrothermal pretreatment

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Fossil oils are a limited resource, not only for energy production, but also as basis for the production of materials. On the other hand, what really provokes research in biomass-derived carbon materials, is the following goal: The development of novel, sustainable materials produced based on the molecular structures available in nature. The materials should be produced in sustainable way and independent on fossil resources. We need new materials, e.g., in view of e-mobility, with better properties and not too high price. For this we need fundamental knowledge about the chemical basics, about the formation and structure-properties relation, but also about the production of such materials.

This Special Issue should include the most recent and innovative work in the field of biomass-derived carbon materials and cover fundamental to applied research.

Prof. Andrea Kruse
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Materials is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Carbonization
  • activation
  • activated carbon
  • biochar
  • biocoal
  • pyrolysis
  • hydrothermal
  • carbon materials
  • hydrochar

Published Papers (15 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Oxytree Pruned Biomass Torrefaction: Mathematical Models of the Influence of Temperature and Residence Time on Fuel Properties Improvement
Materials 2019, 12(14), 2228; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma12142228
Received: 11 June 2019 / Revised: 4 July 2019 / Accepted: 5 July 2019 / Published: 10 July 2019
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (9427 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Biowaste generated in the process of Oxytree cultivation and logging represents a potential source of energy. Torrefaction (a.k.a. low-temperature pyrolysis) is one of the methods proposed for the valorization of woody biomass. Still, energy is required for the torrefaction process during which the [...] Read more.
Biowaste generated in the process of Oxytree cultivation and logging represents a potential source of energy. Torrefaction (a.k.a. low-temperature pyrolysis) is one of the methods proposed for the valorization of woody biomass. Still, energy is required for the torrefaction process during which the raw biomass becomes torrefied biomass with fuel properties similar to those of lignite coal. In this work, models describing the influence of torrefaction temperature and residence time on the resulting fuel properties (mass and energy yields, energy densification ratio, organic matter and ash content, combustible parts, lower and higher heating values, CHONS content, H:C and O:C ratios) were proposed according to the Akaike criterion. The degree of the models’ parameters matching the raw data expressed as the determination coefficient (R2) ranged from 0.52 to 0.92. Each model parameter was statistically significant (p < 0.05). Estimations of the value and quantity of the produced torrefied biomass from 1 Mg of biomass residues were made based on two models and a set of simple assumptions. The value of torrefied biomass (€123.4·Mg−1) was estimated based on the price of commercially available coal fuel and its lower heating value (LHV) for biomass moisture content of 50%, torrefaction for 20 min at 200 °C. This research could be useful to inform techno-economic analyses and decision-making process pertaining to the valorization of pruned biomass residues. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Biomass-Derived Carbon Materials)
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Open AccessArticle
Conductive Carbon Materials from the Hydrothermal Carbonization of Vineyard Residues for the Application in Electrochemical Double-Layer Capacitors (EDLCs) and Direct Carbon Fuel Cells (DCFCs)
Materials 2019, 12(10), 1703; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma12101703
Received: 30 April 2019 / Revised: 20 May 2019 / Accepted: 21 May 2019 / Published: 26 May 2019
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (4689 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This study investigates the production of bio-based carbon materials for energy storage and conversion devices based on two different vineyard residues (pruning, pomace) and cellulose as a model biomass. Three different char categories were produced via pyrolysis at 900 °C for 2 h [...] Read more.
This study investigates the production of bio-based carbon materials for energy storage and conversion devices based on two different vineyard residues (pruning, pomace) and cellulose as a model biomass. Three different char categories were produced via pyrolysis at 900 °C for 2 h (biochars, BC), hydrothermal carbonization (HTC) (at 220, 240 or 260 °C) with different reaction times (60, 120 or 300 min) (hydrochars, HC), or HTC plus pyrolysis (pyrolyzed hydrochars, PHC). Physicochemical, structural, and electrical properties of the chars were assessed by elemental and proximate analysis, gas adsorption surface analysis with N2 and CO2, compression ratio, bulk density, and electrical conductivity (EC) measurements. Thermogravimetric analysis allowed conclusions to be made about the thermochemical conversion processes. Taking into consideration the required material properties for the application in electrochemical double-layer capacitors (EDLC) or in a direct carbon fuel cell (DCFC), the suitability of the obtained materials for each application is discussed. Promising materials with surface areas up to 711 m2 g−1 and presence of microporosity have been produced. It is shown that HTC plus pyrolysis from cellulose and pruning leads to better properties regarding aromatic carbon structures, carbon content (>90 wt.%), EC (up to 179 S m−1), and porosity compared to one-step treatments, resulting in suitable materials for an EDLC application. The one-step pyrolysis process and the resulting chars with lower carbon contents and low EC values between 51 and 56 S m−1 are preferred for DCFC applications. To conclude, biomass potentials can be exploited by producing tailored biomass-derived carbon materials via different carbonization processes for a wide range of applications in the field of energy storage and conversion. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Biomass-Derived Carbon Materials)
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Open AccessArticle
Effect of Air Oxidation on Texture, Surface Properties and Dye Adsorption of Wood-Derived Porous Carbon Materials
Materials 2019, 12(10), 1675; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma12101675
Received: 24 April 2019 / Revised: 17 May 2019 / Accepted: 20 May 2019 / Published: 23 May 2019
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Abstract
Hierarchical porous carbon materials made from cork were fabricated using a facile and green method combined with air activation, without any templates and chemical agents. The influence of air activation on the texture and other surface characteristics of the carbon materials were evaluated [...] Read more.
Hierarchical porous carbon materials made from cork were fabricated using a facile and green method combined with air activation, without any templates and chemical agents. The influence of air activation on the texture and other surface characteristics of the carbon materials were evaluated by various characterization techniques. Results indicate that air oxidation can effectively improve the surface area and the hierarchical porous structure of carbon materials, as well as increase the number of oxygen-containing functional groups on the carbon surface. The specific surface area and the pore volume of the carbon material activated by air at 450 °C (C800-M450) can reach 580 m2/g and 0.379 cm3/g, respectively. These values are considerably higher than those for the non-activated material (C800, 376 m2/g, 0.201 cm3/g). The contents of the functional groups (C–O, C=O and O–H) increased with rising activation temperature. After air activation, the adsorption capacity of the carbon materials for methylene blue (MB) and methyl orange (MO) was increased from 7.7 and 6.4 mg/g for C800 to 312.5 and 97.1 mg/g for C800-M450, respectively. The excellent dye removal of the materials suggests that the porous carbon obtained from biomass can be potentially used for wastewater treatment. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Biomass-Derived Carbon Materials)
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Open AccessArticle
Preparation of Lignin-Based Carbon Materials and Its Application as a Sorbent
Materials 2019, 12(7), 1111; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma12071111
Received: 3 March 2019 / Revised: 31 March 2019 / Accepted: 2 April 2019 / Published: 3 April 2019
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Abstract
The purpose of this article was to explore the influences of synthetic methods on the lignin-based carbon materials. In this paper, the lignin-based activated carbon materials were comparatively researched in ZnCl2 solution using various methods, including the microwave-assisted method, ultrasound method, and [...] Read more.
The purpose of this article was to explore the influences of synthetic methods on the lignin-based carbon materials. In this paper, the lignin-based activated carbon materials were comparatively researched in ZnCl2 solution using various methods, including the microwave-assisted method, ultrasound method, and UV irradiation method, respectively. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (FT-IR), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and differential thermal analysis (DTA) were used to characterize the as-prepared samples. The effects of the synthetic parameters including the types of lignin, activated solution concentration, types of activated solution, and synthetic methods on the morphologies, thermal stability, and specific surface area of samples were comparatively investigated in detail. The specific surface area of lignin-based activated carbon increased to 473.8, 765.3, and 211.2 m2∙g−1 using the microwave-assisted method, ultrasound method, and UV irradiation method, respectively, compared with that of the control (113.4 m2∙g−1). The lignin-based carbon materials displayed the enhanced absorptive capacity, compared with that of the control. These novel synthetic methods reported here maybe have a guiding significance for the synthesis of carbon materials using the lignin as precursors. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Biomass-Derived Carbon Materials)
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Open AccessArticle
Accelerated Microbial Reduction of Azo Dye by Using Biochar from Iron-Rich-Biomass Pyrolysis
Materials 2019, 12(7), 1079; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma12071079
Received: 20 March 2019 / Revised: 31 March 2019 / Accepted: 1 April 2019 / Published: 2 April 2019
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Abstract
Biochar is widely used in the environmental-protection field. This study presents the first investigation of the mechanism of biochar prepared using iron (Fe)-rich biomass and its impact on the reductive removals of Orange G dye by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. The results show that [...] Read more.
Biochar is widely used in the environmental-protection field. This study presents the first investigation of the mechanism of biochar prepared using iron (Fe)-rich biomass and its impact on the reductive removals of Orange G dye by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. The results show that biochars significantly accelerated electron transfer from cells to Orange G and thus stimulated reductive removal rate to 72–97%. Both the conductive domains and the charging and discharging of surface functional groups in biochars played crucial roles in the microbial reduction of Orange G to aniline. A high Fe content of the precursor significantly enhanced the conductor performance of the produced biochar and thus enabled the biochar to have a higher reductive removal rate of Orange G (97%) compared to the biochar prepared using low-Fe precursor (75%), but did not promote the charging and discharging capacity of the produced biochar. This study can prompt the search for natural biomass with high Fe content to confer the produced biochar with wide-ranging applications in stimulating the microbial reduction of redox-active pollutants. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Biomass-Derived Carbon Materials)
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Open AccessArticle
Microwave Hydrothermal Carbonization of Rice Straw: Optimization of Process Parameters and Upgrading of Chemical, Fuel, Structural and Thermal Properties
Materials 2019, 12(3), 403; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma12030403
Received: 18 December 2018 / Revised: 21 January 2019 / Accepted: 26 January 2019 / Published: 28 January 2019
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Abstract
The process parameters of microwave-induced hydrothermal carbonization (MIHTC) play an important role on the hydrothermal chars (hydrochar) yield. The effect of reaction temperature, reaction time, particle size and biomass to water ratio was optimized for hydrochar yield by modeling using the central composite [...] Read more.
The process parameters of microwave-induced hydrothermal carbonization (MIHTC) play an important role on the hydrothermal chars (hydrochar) yield. The effect of reaction temperature, reaction time, particle size and biomass to water ratio was optimized for hydrochar yield by modeling using the central composite design (CCD). Further, the rice straw and hydrochar at optimum conditions have been characterized for energy, chemical, structural and thermal properties. The optimum condition for hydrochar synthesis was found to be at a 180 °C reaction temperature, a 20 min reaction time, a 1:15 weight per volume (w/v) biomass to water ratio and a 3 mm particle size, yielding 57.9% of hydrochar. The higher heating value (HHV), carbon content and fixed carbon values increased from 12.3 MJ/kg, 37.19% and 14.37% for rice straw to 17.6 MJ/kg, 48.8% and 35.4% for hydrochar. The porosity, crystallinity and thermal stability of the hydrochar were improved remarkably compared to rice straw after MIHTC. Two characteristic peaks from XRD were observed at 2θ of 15° and 26°, whereas DTG peaks were observed at 50–150 °C and 300–350 °C for both the materials. Based on the results, it can be suggested that the hydrochar could be potentially used for adsorption, carbon sequestration, energy and agriculture applications. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Biomass-Derived Carbon Materials)
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Open AccessArticle
Preparation and Characterization of Nanoporous Activated Carbon Derived from Prawn Shell and Its Application for Removal of Heavy Metal Ions
Materials 2019, 12(2), 241; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma12020241
Received: 18 December 2018 / Revised: 6 January 2019 / Accepted: 7 January 2019 / Published: 12 January 2019
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (4805 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The aim of this study was to optimize the adsorption performance of activated carbon (AC), derived from the shell of Penaeus vannamei prawns, on heavy metal ions. Inexpensive, non-toxic, and renewable prawn shells were subjected to carbonization and, subsequently, KOH-activation to produce nanoporous [...] Read more.
The aim of this study was to optimize the adsorption performance of activated carbon (AC), derived from the shell of Penaeus vannamei prawns, on heavy metal ions. Inexpensive, non-toxic, and renewable prawn shells were subjected to carbonization and, subsequently, KOH-activation to produce nanoporous K-Ac. Carbonized prawn shells (CPS) and nanoporous KOH-activated carbon (K-Ac) from prawn shells were prepared and characterized by FTIR, XRD, BET, SEM, and TEM. The results showed that as-produced K-Ac samples were a porous material with microporous and mesoporous structures and had a high specific surface area of 3160 m2/g, average pore size of about 10 nm, and large pore volume of 2.38 m3/g. Furthermore, batches of K-Ac samples were employed for testing the adsorption behavior of Cd2+ in solution. The effects of pH value, initial concentration, and adsorption time on Cd2+ were systematically investigated. Kinetics and isotherm model analysis of the adsorption of Cd2+ on K-Ac showed that experimental data were not only consistent with the Langmuir adsorption isotherm, but also well-described by the quasi-first-order model. Finally, the adsorption behaviors of as-prepared K-Ac were also tested in a ternary mixture of heavy metal ions Cu2+, Cr6+, and Cd2+, and the total adsorption amount of 560 mg/g was obtained. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Biomass-Derived Carbon Materials)
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Open AccessArticle
Synthesis and Characterization of Novel Fe-Mn-Ce Ternary Oxide–Biochar Composites as Highly Efficient Adsorbents for As(III) Removal from Aqueous Solutions
Materials 2018, 11(12), 2445; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma11122445
Received: 7 November 2018 / Revised: 22 November 2018 / Accepted: 28 November 2018 / Published: 3 December 2018
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (4588 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The widespread pollution of water bodies with arsenic (As) necessitates the development of efficient decontamination techniques. To address this issue, we herein prepare Fe-Mn-Ce ternary oxide-biochar composites (FMCBCs) using impregnation/sintering methods and examined their physicochemical properties, morphologies, and As(III) removal performances. The specific [...] Read more.
The widespread pollution of water bodies with arsenic (As) necessitates the development of efficient decontamination techniques. To address this issue, we herein prepare Fe-Mn-Ce ternary oxide-biochar composites (FMCBCs) using impregnation/sintering methods and examined their physicochemical properties, morphologies, and As(III) removal performances. The specific surface area of FMCBCs increased with increasing Ce content and enhanced the quantity of surface functional groups (–OH, –COOH). The adsorption of As(III) on FMCBCs was well represented by pseudo-second-order kinetics, and the As(III) adsorption capacity of the best-performing FMCBCs (8.47 mg g−1 for FMCBC3) exceeded that of BC by a factor of 2.9. At pH = 3, the amount of adsorption of As(III) by FMCBCs reached a maximum, and the increased ionic strength could enhance adsorption capacity of FMCBCs. Moreover, an As(III) removal efficiency of ~99% was observed for FMCBC3 at a dosage of 8 g L−1, which highlighted its great potential as an absorbent for As(III) removal from contaminated water. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Biomass-Derived Carbon Materials)
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Open AccessArticle
Almond Shell as a Microporous Carbon Source for Sustainable Cathodes in Lithium–Sulfur Batteries
Materials 2018, 11(8), 1428; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma11081428
Received: 29 June 2018 / Revised: 8 August 2018 / Accepted: 8 August 2018 / Published: 14 August 2018
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (2250 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
A microporous carbon derived from biomass (almond shells) and activated with phosphoric acid was analysed as a cathodic matrix in Li–S batteries. By studying the parameters of the carbonization process of this biomass residue, certain conditions were determined to obtain a high surface [...] Read more.
A microporous carbon derived from biomass (almond shells) and activated with phosphoric acid was analysed as a cathodic matrix in Li–S batteries. By studying the parameters of the carbonization process of this biomass residue, certain conditions were determined to obtain a high surface area of carbon (967 m2 g−1) and high porosity (0.49 cm3 g−1). This carbon was capable of accommodating up to 60% by weight of sulfur, infiltrated by the disulphide method. The C–S composite released an initial specific capacity of 915 mAh g−1 in the Li–S cell at a current density of 100 mA g−1 with a high retention capacity of 760 mAh g−1 after 100 cycles and a coulombic efficiency close to 100%. The good performance of the composite was also observed under higher current rates (up to 1000 mA g−1). The overall electrochemical behaviour of this microporous carbon acting as a sulfur host reinforces the possibility of using biomass residues as sustainable sources of materials for energy storage. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Biomass-Derived Carbon Materials)
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Open AccessArticle
Sequential Production of Levulinic Acid and Porous Carbon Material from Cellulose
Materials 2018, 11(8), 1408; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma11081408
Received: 23 July 2018 / Revised: 8 August 2018 / Accepted: 9 August 2018 / Published: 11 August 2018
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (5440 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
A sequential production of levulinic acid (LA) and porous carbon material (CM) from cellulose was conducted by a two-step process. The cellulose was first acid hydrolyzed, and the preferred reaction conditions required a severity factor of 4.0–4.5, in which the yields of LA, [...] Read more.
A sequential production of levulinic acid (LA) and porous carbon material (CM) from cellulose was conducted by a two-step process. The cellulose was first acid hydrolyzed, and the preferred reaction conditions required a severity factor of 4.0–4.5, in which the yields of LA, formic acid, and solid residue were 38 ± 3 wt%, 17 ± 3 wt%, and 15 ± 3 wt%, respectively. The solid residue was further used for CM preparation through pyrolysis, with or without ZnCl2 activation. The ZnCl2 activation promoted the formation of CMs with improved thermal stability, high surface area (1184–2510 m2/g), and excellent phenol adsorption capacity (136–172 mg/g). The used CM can be easily regenerated by a simple methanol Soxhlet extraction process, and a comparable phenol adsorption capacity of 97 mg/g was maintained for the 5th reusing. Finally, 100 g cellulose produced 40.5 g LA, 18.9 g formic acid and 8.5 g porous CM, with a total carbon utilization ratio reaching 74.4%. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Biomass-Derived Carbon Materials)
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Open AccessArticle
Biomass-Derived Nitrogen-Doped Carbon Aerogel Counter Electrodes for Dye Sensitized Solar Cells
Materials 2018, 11(7), 1171; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma11071171
Received: 7 June 2018 / Revised: 4 July 2018 / Accepted: 5 July 2018 / Published: 9 July 2018
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (2229 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Dye sensitized solar cells have emerged as an attractive alternative to conventional solar cells due to their easy processing and the abundance and low cost of their materials. However, the counter electrode in these cells employs platinum which significantly impacts their cost. Here, [...] Read more.
Dye sensitized solar cells have emerged as an attractive alternative to conventional solar cells due to their easy processing and the abundance and low cost of their materials. However, the counter electrode in these cells employs platinum which significantly impacts their cost. Here, we report biomass-derived, nitrogen-doped carbon aerogel as an effective alternative to conventional platinum-based counter electrodes for dye sensitized solar cells. A stable suspension of biomass-derived, nitrogen-doped carbon aerogel was prepared in DMF by using oleylamine as a binder. The nitrogen-doped carbon aerogel electrode was annealed at different temperatures, and its impact on photovoltaic performance is investigated. I-V measurements confirm that the annealing temperature substantially enhances the photovoltaic parameters of these devices; these enhancements are linked to the removal of the organic binders. Electrochemical impedance spectra of the counter electrodes confirm that removal of oleylamine in nitrogen-doped carbon aerogels reduces the series resistance of the resulting electrodes. The power conversion efficiency of the solar cells from optimized nitrogen-doped carbon aerogel exhibited comparable efficiency to that of a cell fabricated using a platinum-based counter electrode. This study demonstrates the potential of biomass-derived carbon aerogels as a cheap and sustainable replacement of platinum in DSSCs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Biomass-Derived Carbon Materials)
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Open AccessArticle
Wheat Straw-Derived N-, O-, and S-Tri-doped Porous Carbon with Ultrahigh Specific Surface Area for Lithium-Sulfur Batteries
Materials 2018, 11(6), 989; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma11060989
Received: 7 May 2018 / Revised: 4 June 2018 / Accepted: 11 June 2018 / Published: 11 June 2018
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (30722 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Recently, lithium-sulfur (Li-S) batteries have been greeted by a huge ovation owing to their very high theoretical specific capacity (1675 mAh·g−1) and theoretical energy density (2600 Wh·kg−1). However, the full commercialization of Li-S batteries is still hindered by dramatic [...] Read more.
Recently, lithium-sulfur (Li-S) batteries have been greeted by a huge ovation owing to their very high theoretical specific capacity (1675 mAh·g−1) and theoretical energy density (2600 Wh·kg−1). However, the full commercialization of Li-S batteries is still hindered by dramatic capacity fading resulting from the notorious “shuttle effect” of polysulfides. Herein, we first describe the development of a facile, inexpensive, and high-producing strategy for the fabrication of N-, O-, and S-tri-doped porous carbon (NOSPC) via pyrolysis of natural wheat straw, followed by KOH activation. The as-obtained NOSPC shows characteristic features of a highly porous carbon frame, ultrahigh specific surface area (3101.8 m2·g−1), large pore volume (1.92 cm3·g−1), good electrical conductivity, and in situ nitrogen (1.36 at %), oxygen (7.43 at %), and sulfur (0.7 at %) tri-doping. The NOSPC is afterwards selected to fabricate the NOSPC-sulfur (NOSPC/S) composite for the Li-S batteries cathode material. The as-prepared NOSPC/S cathode delivers a large initial discharge capacity (1049.2 mAh·g−1 at 0.2 C), good cycling stability (retains a reversible capacity of 454.7 mAh·g−1 over 500 cycles at 1 C with a low capacity decay of 0.088% per cycle), and superior rate performance (619.2 mAh·g−1 at 2 C). The excellent electrochemical performance is mainly attributed to the synergistic effects of structural restriction and multidimensional chemical adsorptions for cooperatively repressing the polysulfides shuttle. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Biomass-Derived Carbon Materials)
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Open AccessArticle
Fabrication of α-Fe/Fe3C/Woodceramic Nanocomposite with Its Improved Microwave Absorption and Mechanical Properties
Materials 2018, 11(6), 878; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma11060878
Received: 15 April 2018 / Revised: 30 April 2018 / Accepted: 3 May 2018 / Published: 24 May 2018
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (4463 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Furan resin and fir powder pretreated by FeCl3 and aqueous ammonia solution were used to fabricate α-Fe/Fe3C/woodceramic nanocomposite. The bands of the pretreated wood powder were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The structural characterization of the nanocomposites was [...] Read more.
Furan resin and fir powder pretreated by FeCl3 and aqueous ammonia solution were used to fabricate α-Fe/Fe3C/woodceramic nanocomposite. The bands of the pretreated wood powder were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The structural characterization of the nanocomposites was performed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The microwave absorption of the nanocomposites was measured by a vector network analyzer in the range of 2–18 GHz. The mechanical properties of the composites were also investigated. XRD and SEM results show that the α-Fe and Fe3C nanoparticles are in-situ generated and disperse in the matrix of the woodceramic. The diameters of these nanoparticles increase with the increasing of concentration of FeCl3 solution. The experimental results show that both the complex permittivity and the complex permeability of α-Fe/Fe3C/woodceramic nanocomposites increase as the concentration of FeCl3 solution increases. The composites pretreated with 0.60 mol·L−1 FeCl3 have the best absorption properties. The maximum value of reflection loss (RL) at 3 mm thickness reaches −25.60 dB at 10.16 GHz and the bandwidth below −10 dB is about 2.5 GHz. Compared to woodceramic, the bending strength and compressive strength of α-Fe/Fe3C/woodceramic nanocomposites increase by 22.5% and 18.7% at most, respectively. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Biomass-Derived Carbon Materials)
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Open AccessArticle
Porous Structure Properties of Andropogon gerardi Derived Carbon Materials
Materials 2018, 11(6), 876; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma11060876
Received: 30 April 2018 / Revised: 14 May 2018 / Accepted: 22 May 2018 / Published: 24 May 2018
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (3930 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Various carbonaceous materials are valuable resources for thermochemical conversion processes and for production of materials of proven sorption properties, useful in environmental applications for gaseous and liquid media treatment. In both cases, the parameters of the porous structure of carbon materials are decisive [...] Read more.
Various carbonaceous materials are valuable resources for thermochemical conversion processes and for production of materials of proven sorption properties, useful in environmental applications for gaseous and liquid media treatment. In both cases, the parameters of the porous structure of carbon materials are decisive in terms of their physical and mechanical properties, having direct effects on heat and mass transport as well as on sorption capacity and selectivity. The physical activation of carbon materials produced from various precursors is widely discussed in literature. In this respect, the effects of temperature and partial oxidation of carbonaceous materials with steam or carbon dioxide are mostly considered. The reports on the effects of pressure on the development of porous structures of carbon materials are, however, extremely limited, especially when biomass as a precursor is concerned. In this paper, the results of an experimental study on the effects of pressure in the range of 1–4 MPa on the specific surface area, the total pore volume, average pore diameter, and microporosity of carbon materials prepared with the use of Andropogon gerardi biomass as a precursor are presented. The tested samples were prepared at the temperature of 1000 °C under an inert gas atmosphere in the high-pressure thermogravimetric analyzer. The most developed porous structure was reported for carbon materials produced under 3 MPa. The highest volume of narrow micropores was characteristic for materials carbonized under 2 MPa. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Biomass-Derived Carbon Materials)
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Review

Jump to: Research

Open AccessReview
Biobased Functional Carbon Materials: Production, Characterization, and Applications—A Review
Materials 2018, 11(9), 1568; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma11091568
Received: 3 August 2018 / Revised: 23 August 2018 / Accepted: 24 August 2018 / Published: 31 August 2018
Cited by 7 | PDF Full-text (3964 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Even though research on porous carbon materials from biomass dates back to at least hundred years, it is still an extremely relevant topic. These materials can be found in applications that range from those that are widely known, such as water treatment, to [...] Read more.
Even though research on porous carbon materials from biomass dates back to at least hundred years, it is still an extremely relevant topic. These materials can be found in applications that range from those that are widely known, such as water treatment, to others that are newer and indispensable for the transition towards environmentally friendly technologies, such as lithium- and sodium-ion batteries. This review summarizes some of the most relevant research that has been published concerning production technologies, insights on the chemical reaction mechanisms, characterization techniques, as well as some examples of the applications and the properties that the carbon materials must fulfil to be used in those applications. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Biomass-Derived Carbon Materials)
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